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Brush Strokes

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Bruce Em, Mar 1, 2009.

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  1. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    I had this up on another board but in my recent experience, it has been much better for trap. What do you think?

    In the few years that passed since I returned to shooting shotguns, I notice little things that correlate to successful techniques but am uncertain of their true meaning or value.

    One that I have frequently noticed, but can not always reproduce, is what I would call a "brush stroke", for lack of a better term. It is a quick hop to the target (to match target speed) followed by a quick, but VERY short passing stroke while firing; say 6" stroke at my forward hand. It is almost like the trigger is a garden hose giving a half second burst of water on the target.

    There is no maintained lead, no thought, no hesitancy, no slowing down and no lunging to the target. It is fast and smooth. I can do it gun down for trap as well. As soon as I see the bird, I mount and shoot. Gun down seems easier b/c there is no initial muscle tension o rintertia to start a dead gun.

    I suppose it is just a swing through but I think of that as a constant speed passing of the bird coupled with firing. The brush stroke is as if I had a paintbrush in hand and reached up to give the bird a "check mark" with the brush. Perhaps it's just a pull away but for that you need to start on or in front. Maybe it just doesnt matter what you call it, it works. Had a 24 each time I did it and that's a bit better than my average.

    In my limited travels, I haven't seen much on this. Is the true definition of swing thru a constant speed passing of the target or the brush stroke? I suspect the constant speed swing is less successful for me.


    thanks
     
  2. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Bruce- I have used the technique you described for skeet but not for trap. For trap, I try to keep my head on the stock, look at the bird and everything else just takes care of itself. My body will automatically move the gun to what I am looking at and the gun just seems to know when to go off. The less thinking I do, the better I shoot.

    Pat Ireland
     
  3. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Lucky shot I'd say. Follow thru is a myth. The good shooters get to the target and shoot it. Learn to shoot Terry Jordan's "dots" on his wall chart if you must. but leave the painting to somoeone else.
     
  4. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Are you saying you pop to a spot and shoot? If so, how well do you do at other shotgun sports? (bunker, Fitasc, skeet, Intl skeet, 5 stand, sporting etc). You may also be using this minor motion that I am referring to and not even realize it. It is very difficult to put a physical action into words. Like describing a good pistol shot. You hear but do not understand, or understand but can not say it.

    Other styles may work for you if you have some gun speed from behind or you're ahead and gaining, but being ahead and slowing down (measurers) is a sure fire loser.

    I see a lot of trap shooters at the clubs I frequent who are one trick ponies. They are "rifle shooters", "measurers", "swing, stop, and shooters" and are frustrated to hell when the conditions, or the game changes, like er ah skeet.

    Lucky shot? I don't think so. Working and training with a retired Winchester Gun Club shooter, you bet.

    Think about it, and I will ponder your writings as well.
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    MIA- I would like to expand on your statement "Follow thru is a myth". I would state that follow through is misunderstood. To me, it means keeping your head on the comb and the gun into your shoulder immediately after you shoot. It does not mean keep the sun swinging after you shoot.

    Pat Ireland
     
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