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Browning Midas need info engraving - salt wood

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by OldRemFan, Nov 14, 2011.

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  1. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    I am sure someone on here can provide pertinent information regarding the engraving on the early Browning Midas guns made in Belgium, and later date Midas grade guns. It appears different in my opinion, as to quality and depth, but is that my imagination?

    I also need information on when and what models the used salt wood. Is there a serial number range or year range that one can be sure is actually right.

    Were the full choked Broadway's choked to the same constriction as a full choke field model? I have a couple of friends that seem to have a different opinion on that.

    Either a PM or post would be great if you can help me out on this or get me headed in the right direction as to where to look.

    Thanks for your help

    Bob
     
  2. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Bob, buy yourself a bore gauge, ends all guessing. One of the best tools a shotgunner can have. You're welcome Gary :)
     
  3. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    +1 for checking out Arts...
     
  4. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Bob Hawkes

    I have a bore gauge. Wouldn't be without one again. I just don't have the expertise that comes with being able to compare that many Browning field bores with the Broadway Browning. I have been told the full choke Broadway is choked .003 to .005 tighter than the full choke field guns. I thought someone dealing in Brownings, or having a lot of experience with them, could verify if that is correct information or not.

    I found an Art's Gun and Sport Shop. Good information, so I will assume that is the Art's mentioned.

    Thanks
     
  5. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    This is worth the time to watch Art restore this Browning.

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/2Ni-5RIgbYg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
     
  6. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I'm sure that the chokes will be influenced by the bore diameter of the barrels.
     
  7. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Thanks guys for the good information so far. Art has some pretty good videos out.

    I am considering purchasing an early Midas if I can find a nice one, but the road to success looks like it is full of pot holes with the salt wood problem. It appears that problem can rear it's ugly head anywhere any time on Browning and possibly some other guns.
     
  8. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    I believe the salt problem only affected short tang guns...
     
  9. eightbore

    eightbore Well-Known Member

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    Are you looking for a trap or a field model? A long tang round knob Midas will be salt free, but are very rare. Any later gun will have to be tested for salt. The full chokes will be within the "range" stated in Schwing's book, whether field or trap gun. Many square knob Midas Traps are salt free, but surface inspection is not enough of a test. Midas field configured guns seem to be more scarce than trap configured guns, or maybe they are just more closely held in collections.
     
  10. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    BigM

    That is the kind of information I was looking for. Art (Art's Gun Shop) said the wood has turned up in his shop on some higher grade gun made in the 1980's, along with some BT99's.
    He also states that Bishop and Fajen ended up with quite a lot of the wood. Weatherby also used some of the wood.

    In your opinion, what years are included in the salt wood models?

    Eightbore:

    I am looking mostly for a trap, but wouldn't turn down a field model if the right gun comes by. The inspection part is the snag. A lot of people take a dim view of someone taking their shotgun apart for an inspection, and according to Art the way to tell for sure is to check the wood with a silver nitrate solution diluted to 1%. I guess I need to locate a copy of Schwing's book to look at.

    Thanks again guys for the information. Any help is appreciated.
     
  11. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    I seem to recall that removing the original factory buttstock screws will tell if they are rusted. of course, they may have been replaced!

    I think it was Claro Walnut from California from '67-'71. I think it was all destroyed in '71 so anything '72 or later should be fine.

    Claro, I believe, was only used on the upgraded guns..

    Art has all the information you need...
     
  12. slugbug1

    slugbug1 Member

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    Arts info. here. GaryL.
     
  13. twotimer

    twotimer Member

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    Bob, the salt guns ran from 1966-1972. Mike
     
  14. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    What twotimer said. Have seen a lot of high grade Brownings in the late 60's with salt wood.
     
  15. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Good information guys
     
  16. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    I think the salt period is pretty well pinned down, and I appreciate the information on that.

    Two more follow up questions before I try to make a purchase. It looks to me like the engraving on the early 60's models is deeper and maybe better quality, than guns say from the early 70's and later. Or is that just my imagination? All I have to compare with is pictures and I realize that can be tricky. Some of you that own both or have dealt in Brownings should be able to fill me in on that.

    In your opinion is the early inertia set trigger more or less desirable than the mechanical trigger that Browning changed to sometime in the early 70's? Does the mechanical trigger change the value one way or the other.

    Remington 3200's I know a little about, but I am about to venture out of my area of knowledge on a nostalgia trip on the Browning and I appreciate the help.

    Thanks again

    Bob
     
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