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Broken Remington 3200 stock

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by prairiewind, Oct 14, 2007.

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  1. prairiewind

    prairiewind TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Does anyone know of a source for a factory, straight trap (not a Monte Carlo) Remington 3200 stock? My stock was repaired in 2000 but it's cracking again and this time it looks like a goner. I contacted Laibs once before but he couldn't help. I don't really want to spend big bucks having a new stock made on a gun that old even though I love it and shoot it well.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. jmq4

    jmq4 TS Member

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    Sep 15, 2007
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    Numrich has them - I ordered a forend from them and wasn't impressed, maybe you'll have better luck with a stock.

    Joe


    http://www.e-gunparts.com/DisplayAd.asp?chrProductSKU=100690&chrSuperSKU=&MC=
     
  3. jmq4

    jmq4 TS Member

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    Forgot to add - if you have an FFL or C&R, Numrich gives a pretty decent discount. In this case $100.80 versus $112.00.

    Joe
     
  4. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Location:
    Northampton PA
    Call Gunworks Stock Repair at 413-323-4052. He's always done excellent work on broken 3200 stocks for me!!
     
  5. prairiewind

    prairiewind TS Member

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    Thanks guys! jmq4, I ordered the stock from Numrich. I figured for $112 I couldn't go wrong. I'm not as concerned about beauty as I am strength so if it turns our to be just a plain piece of straight grained walnut, so much the better. The Numrich stock is oil finished so I will end up refinshing it so that it will better match the forend but I can live with that too. My orginial wood is very nice and I would have loved to have it repaired again if I thought it would have worked out but I'm afraid it just wouldn't have been a smart investment.

    Thanks again for the replies.
     
  6. Joe Woods

    Joe Woods Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend you get it professionally fitted. They can be a problem.
    High points. Just a suggestion. Maybe get it strengthened before you start.

    Joe Woods/Ontario
     
  7. jmq4

    jmq4 TS Member

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    PW:

    I think I have actually seen a stock from Numrich - it was a glossy monte carlo number that looked pretty robust. It wasn't that bad, no real grain to speak of and a pretty 'dated' recoil pad, but, to be honest, it would have done the job just fine.

    I would be interested in your impression after you get it.

    Joe
     
  8. theodorescolt45

    theodorescolt45 TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Messages:
    88
    I bought a straight Trap 3200 from Numrich and it was fine, but was not checkered
    If you can live w/o checkering it's a good deal. They are listed as factory stocks and come with a Remington pad ... but I never saw a 3200 w/o checkering especially on a Trap model ? maybe they just were not completely finished or were to be checkered later depending on the pattern ( Std. or Comp or Special )
    anyway, good stock for the money
     
  9. jimbob

    jimbob TS Member

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    Be very cafefull tightening the stock bolt. I believe that teh specs on a 3200 call for no more then 15 ft-lbs. That's not much, and something less then "snug". I think over-tightening causes more split 3200 stocks then anything else.
     
  10. 333t

    333t Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    The factory manual I used to have for the 3200 called for 5 lb. of torque on the stock bolt. wolve is absolutely correct. If you tighten up the stock bolt too much, the receiver/stock mating surfaces become a wedge that will split the stock.

    Phil
     
  11. prairiewind

    prairiewind TS Member

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    Thanks for all the help and great info. I'll post a review whenever I get the stock. The current wood on my gun is very beautiful but I also know that straight grained walnut would be be stronger. I was aware of the five pounds of torque requirement when tightening the stock but heck, I don't have a way to accurately measure this and I'm betting it comes down to guess work and feel for a lot of 3200 owners. Anyway, I have always tried to be careful.

    Thanks again.
     
  12. prairiewind

    prairiewind TS Member

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    I received the stock from Numrich and it is a Remington factory stock (Numrich confirmed this). It is an exceptionally nice piece of wood. I was shocked and pleased to get so lucky. The finish is an oil finish and the stock is not checkered. It's so nice that I wish I could have purchased an uncheckered, oil finished forend to match but none were available. The only negative thing was that the screws holding the Remington recoil pad had to be replaced. One of them had a head stripped to the point that I ended up having a gunsmith remove the pad and replace the screws. Still, all in all I came out better than I had hoped and it worked out well since the gunsmith could apply the proper amount of torque to the stock bolt better than me guessing at it.

    Thanks all for the help.
     
  13. ou.3200

    ou.3200 Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    The tang where the stock bolt fits should be epoxy bedded to the stock. This is done by putting a reinforcement (like those used on notebook paper to reinforce the holes) around the bolt where it comes through the stock, coating the bolt threads and tang with a release agent and then putting a small dab of epoxy where the wood meets the tang before assembling the stock. Only snug the bolt down a little so as to not displace all the epoxy and disassemble when the epoxy has set. Be sure to coat the metal with release agent so as to not weld the whole thing together. I used JB Weld quick the last time I did it. If this is not done there is a good chance the stock will split from recoil.
     
  14. guncase

    guncase TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    too bad,,, I have a used stock , straight, checkered, and no cracks top or bottom. I would sell for $125. Shipped to you! Paul.............guncase@aol.com
     
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