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BRIAN-I-O STEVENS 416

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by break25, Sep 6, 2007.

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  1. break25

    break25 TS Member

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    Brian, I have a Stevens 416 22 Rim TARGET RIFLE. Stamped US GOVERMENT,Parkerized on a BULL BARREL. But it has a missing clip. Do you have any idea of it's worth NRA GOOD. Any history on these? I assumed they were used for training?

    CHAZZ
     
  2. break25

    break25 TS Member

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  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    I don't have a current gun price book, so I duno its bluebook value. I've seen these in the $300 to $600 range depending on condition at gun shows. I think the upper end prices are out of line, unless the gun is flawless and has desirable accessories. You know how gunshows are - ask a fortune because most buyers will dicker anyway.<br>
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    # 3188 - Stevens 416-2 .22 Rifle<br>
    11/4/00<br>
    Tim Hazard KY, USA<br>
    <br>

    J Stevens Arms Company - 416 - 22 - blue - 204472 -<br>
    stamped on Barrel it has the word STEVENS then it has a circle with an "X" in it and the words BARREL it also has a circle with flames coming off it, and the words U.S. Property also stamped on it. I would like to know what the circle with the x means and also what the circle with the flames mean and if this rifle was used in the military for any reason and if possible the year it was made<br>
    <br>
    Answer:<br>
    Tim- The Stevens 416-2 rifle was a medium quality target rifle in commercial production prior to WW2, comparable to the Winchester Model 75 and the Remington 513-T. In smallbore shooter language, "X" refers to a center shot in the 10 ring, or what many people would term a bullseye. Therefore "X" is frequently used in smallbore target stuff to entice people to buy the products on the assumption that it would contribute to their scoring "X's". Other examples are "EZ-X" brand target ammo, and Ten-X shooting jackets. The "circle with flames coming out of it" is usually called an "ordnance bomb, or flaming bomb". This is the mark used by many military ordnance or artillery people around the world with some variations in the details. It has traditionally been used by the U.S. Army's Ordnance Corps to identify ordnance items and as an inspection mark. The U.S. Property marking is to make it real obvious that while this may look like a commercial product, it belongs to the U.S. Government and should not be in civilian custody.<br>
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    Just before and during the first part of WW2 large contracts were made for several types of .22 rifles for training purposes. Steven first military orders for the 416-2 came in September 1941. By the time production ceased in 1943, some 10,388 were delivered at a cost of $17.98 each.<br>
    <br>

    These are good collector items, and we recently added a good reference book on U.S. Military .22 rifles to our book page. John Spangler.<br>
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    This site has a book about US military rimfire rifles, including the Stevens M-416T:<br>
    <br>
    Batha, Thomas D.<br>
    U.S. MARTIAL .22RF RIFLES.<br>
    104 pages, illustrated with 63 photographs. U.S. Martial .22RF Rifles is a detailed review of the firearms used as martial .22RF training rifles by the U.S. services. Beginning with the model 1889 Rolling block conversion, the book traces the use of the Krag, Hoffer-Thompson, Winder Musket, Winchester M 1903, Model 1922 Springfield Gallery Practice Rifles, Remington M 513-T, Win. M 75, Stevens M 416-T, Mossberg M 42MB & 44US, and the H&R M 65 & MC-58. Postwar rifles covered include the Mossberg M 144US, the Win. M 52 series, the Remington Models 511-P, 40X, 521 & 541-X, M16 conversions, the H&R M 5200, Kimber M 82 Government and miscellaneous rifles. A comprehensive appendix of rifle data is included in the book.<br>
    <br>
    Date Published: 2000<br>
    Price: $13.89<br>
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    <br>
    This site has a discussion of typical prices.
     
  4. Ohio Bob

    Ohio Bob Member

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    I gave $135.00 for mine with the sights and inserts, sling and swivels

    Shoots very well but not a 300.00+ gun

    OB
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    From a shooting standpoint, no, they aren't a $300+ gun. But this is a martial collectors piece, and that's why the prices are out of proportion to the guns performance.
     
  6. break25

    break25 TS Member

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    Sorry I did not get back to you all.

    Thanks for the replies


    CHAZZ
     
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