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Breaking in a new Browning Citori

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by jbmi, Aug 13, 2007.

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  1. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

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    Just bought the wife a new Citori XT. As with any new Browning the action is very stiff and tight. Other than just working the action over a long period of time, is there a quicker way to loosen it?
    She's not that big and almost has to bend it over her knee to break it open.
     
  2. C H S

    C H S TS Member

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    Some Brownings come from the factory a bit too tight. A good gunsmith could probably polish the mating surfaces of the knuckle with a graver's arkansas finishing stone. They will know how much metal is too much to remove. Do not try this at home!

    Andy
     
  3. TommyTEREX

    TommyTEREX Member

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    There was a thread asking about this same thing not so long ago. Do a search on XTs, and you`ll find some good info, along with photos to help you out.

    Tom R.
     
  4. stockguru

    stockguru TS Member

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    Correct proceedure is to remove media from the back of the fore arm lug. This part of the lug binds against the front of the lug receptacle inside the fore arm iron. Take fore arm off and look inside....the oblongated slot is where the lug fits down into. The amount of excess metal on the back of the lug determines how tight it will be. A couple thousand shots down the road, it will get loose. Some people like the barrels to "flop" right open. Technically, if you push the top lever to the right, the barrels should slowly open(if hammers are already cocked). Get a reliable gunsmith to do this, not your garage hobbyist.
     
  5. SirMissalott

    SirMissalott Active Member

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    Please be carefull I saw a BT-100 ruined by someone going a LITTLE too far
     
  6. Lkn4rocks

    Lkn4rocks TS Member

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    *

    This is just another opinion.

    Myself I like the gun to get loose on its’ own. If your lady will only grip the wrist of the stock with her right hand, with that hand resting on her hip, pushing the unlocking lever to unlock with her thumb, now with her left hand reach forward of the forearm and pull down and rearward, the gun should open and soon enough, it will be loose on it's own to just drop open when unlocked.

    Or with the unlocking lever pushed over to unlock just give the gun a little downward jerk and the momentum of the barrel will open it up. It may take a little practice but still let the gun ware its self in, it will be all to loose later on, you may need all the metal fit up you can get in the future.

    Just my two cents.
     
  7. likes-to-shoot

    likes-to-shoot Well-Known Member

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    The way I did my Citori combo is to move the lever and break it open a little way and then put the barrel on a toe rest on my foot,then push on the stock to open the action all the way. The un-single is fairly easy now but the over&under is still a little tight. Hope this helps or give you another idea.

    Bill
     
  8. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    If they are really tight and you don't fit the lug make sure you keep the mating surfaces between forarm and receiver lubed with a good product like STP or Militech. Once galled, they can't be healed.

    I touch them up myself till they just barely fall open a little bit on their own. You remove metal from the tang where it pushes the forend into the reciever. Had to fit my 4 barrel set, each one was different.

    As said, if you are not sure, have a smith do it.

    HM
     
  9. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Rub some STP or Mobile 1 30 weight or below on the bearing points

    it will drop open

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  10. Beancounter

    Beancounter TS Member

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    This has been covered multiple times. Mass produced guns frequently have fore ends that are too tight. The fore end of a Browning is not supposed to provide the lock-up for the action. That is provided by a well fitted locking bolt. The fore end is not supposed to be that f'ing tight. Yes, if left alone and muscled open for a few thousand shots, you will wear away enough metal that the gun is easier to open. But that is not the choice I would make. Stockguru gave you what I believe to be the correct information. I just believe that the correction can be affected by the owner with no negative consequences and no damage to the gun.

    You can prove this to yourself. Is the forearm difficult to get onto the gun? If you have to really squeeze or must give the lever a love tap to get it on, it is way too tight or the forearm hardware screws are not tightened. Checking the forearm hardware for tight will probably challenge many as the screw slots are narrow. But before removing any metal from any surface of that gun, you must determine if that forearm hardware is tight. If the forearm hardware is tight, metal must be removed from the back of the hanger on the barrel. Removing metal from the forearm hanger is very easy as that metal is soft. That means you do not attack the task. Go slow. You will notice your progress by seeing how much easier is to put the forearm on the gun.
     
  11. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. Took a fine file and after just a few passes gun opens much easier and the forearm goes on smoother, still tight, but I'll let the gun do the rest.
     
  12. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    that file advice was bad advice -- you just used 10-30 thousand shells with a couple of swipes

    the advice about lubrication given by several people was the right advice
     
  13. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

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    GN7777777 - You missed the part about the fore end not being designed to provide the lock up on the gun. Please explain yourself. Would you agree that if the forearm hardware is nice and tight, it should just snap on the gun with no real effort?

    If effort is required and if the hardware is tight, the forearm hanger must be reduced very slightly. Before you respond, remember that the lockup of the action is provided by the locking bolt. The darn forearm has nothing to do with it.

    To Joe 702, back in my pisol shooting days, I recall a study of the effectiveness of various lubricants. As I recall, Wolfs Head motor oil was better in all the rated categories over "gun" oils.
     
  14. tonygrz

    tonygrz TS Member

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    Back in the old days - 1970's - I used powdered graphite to loosen a tight new o/u. Worked it in for a long evening and then cleaned it up. Was just loose enough to open on its own but not to loose.

    tony
     
  15. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Gene has the "other" type of Browning where the barrel tang somehow is involved with the locking bar.

    No wonder no one wants to buy it.

    HM
     
  16. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    gary I read that comparison -- wolf heads was the only motor oil tested and the rest were gun lubricants

    gun companies have a few thousand to invest for R&D

    motor oil companies have millions-- there was such a company right down the road from where i Lived as a kid-- Lubrizol- employed about 500 people and was always working with auto and oil companies

    Gene

    PS the forearm lug actually is part of the triangle -- it pushes the barrel into the hinge recess and against the breach face-- all three wear in together

    forearm lug- hinge pins and locking lug

    It works that way on nearly every o/u -- not all but nearly

    HM there is no such thing as a barrel tang-- what are you talking about? guess that mind numbing union work you are always talking about affected you huh?

    HM at least we agree on the stp or miltec- both of which were sometimes used for centers

    Likes to shoot is dead wrong also- dont put any weight on a gun pushed toward the ground- not because it might come off your shoe and ruin the muzzle(thats possible also) but because the hinge pin and forearm are not designed for that much stress when all the way open--

    its just like leaving an O/U open in the rack-- only much worse
     
  17. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

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    The few passes I made with the fine file made the forearm attach much easier, now just a bump of the forearm will seat the latch, where before you had to press it down with both fingers and almost pry it open. I have two other Citori's, one with over ten thousand rounds through it, the other with only a few thousand, both open much easier than this new one and still lock up tight, also their forearms go on easier, so I'm not worried that I took to much off. As far as grease goes I'm using what came with my Krieghoff.
     
  18. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

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    Sorry GN7777777 - I will agree to disagree with you. If you complain to to Browning, they will make the same repair suggested. But if the forarm hardware is not tight - all bets are off. And on new gun that is a real possibility. But do you really think you must "force" the forearm onto the gun? If you fix the "force it onto the gun" problem, you will also cure the hard to open issue.

    The lube thing I put in just to provide another point of view. when considering the lubricating qualities of the many types of oil out there, one should never overlook the stuff that keeps the car running. Personally, I use a synthetic grease called super lube. But I also clean my guns after every day I shoot. I never just add more grease. But to simply dismiss motor oil out of hand without considering everything might be imprudent.
     
  19. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    the synthetics have a suface tension-- and I might be using the wrong term-- need a lubricants or fluid engineer but that is the quality that causes it to stay on the surface of something

    the synthetic motor oils are several times as high as regular motor oils I seem to remember--

    regards from Iowa

    Gene

    Gary you might be right about the forearm lug-- the devil is really in the detail of that argument- location , location, location
     
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