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Bought Chinese Goods lately????

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by 221, May 17, 2011.

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  1. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    "<EM>And the Chinese government has now suspended all diesel exports to ensure supplies as factories switch to using fuel-powered generators.

    China is also trying to meet its demand for energy by securing oil supplies from abroad.

    According to the independent U.S. Energy Information Administration:

    “The Chinese government’s energy policies are dominated by the country’s growing demand for oil and its reliance on oil imports.”

    And that is where China’s energy crisis is likely to affect the American consumer the most by driving up gas prices even more."</EM>

    Hows that global economy working for ya?
     
  2. oz

    oz Active Member

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    Try finding something that is NOT chinese. oz
     
  3. jrw136

    jrw136 Member

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    Did you read about their exploding watermelons? Used too much of the wrong kind of chemicals. Don’t worry about the future, we’ll all die soon from some industrial poisoning coming from over there.
     
  4. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    221's Plan for Keeping China in the Stone Age, Forever:



    (sound of crickets chirping)
     
  5. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    I cannot believe that our corporate food industry is getting so much food from China. It cannot be healthy. I have actually talked to the Store Manager at Marsh, Kroger, and Mejier about having no other choices in the fish selection than red chinese products. They all smile and say they are looking into it. Growing fish in raw sewage and then soaking the fillets in antibiotics does not equal healthy food. My friend, a Purdue chemical engineering professor has been contracted by the government studying the effect of Chinese pollution in Alaska. The findings are very troubling. They really do not care what they contaminate. In the mean time, our own federal emission standards are getting so rough that the best of todays technology cannot make the standards. If we didn't emit ANY pollution, we would still be contaminated by red china. Yet we keep shipping our countries wealth and future to china in exchange for crap that will not last until the end of the year. brilliant
     
  6. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    More then most would want to know....

    For China, Coal is Still King - Institute for Energy Research

    January 21, 2011

    China is currently the largest producer and consumer of coal in the world, outstripping the United States by a factor of more than 3[ii]. In fact China’s growth in coal consumption is so great that it needs to import coal to satisfy its demand even though it ranks third in coal reserves in the world[iii].

    China became a net importer of coal in 2009, buying almost 151 million tons[iv] from coal exporting countries, including the United States and Australia.

    That number is expected to increase substantially in the years to come. The Chinese use coal, the primary fuel spurring its economic growth, in most sectors of the economy, but particularly in the electric power and industrial sectors.

    China’s economic growth is so phenomenal that it expects to have 350 million people, more than the entire population in the United States,[v] living in cities that do not yet exist within the next 15 years,[vi] which will require additional electrical capacity of an amount almost equal to the total electrical capacity of the United States.[vii]

    -----------------------------------------

    -----------------------------------------

    Fueling the dragon: China's race into the oil market

    - The Institute for the Analysis of Global Security -

    With 1.3 billion people, the People's Republic of China is the world's most populous country and the second largest oil consumer, behind the U.S. In recent years, China has been undergoing a process of industrialization and is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. With real gross domestic product growing at a rate of 8-10% a year, China's need for energy is projected to increase by 150 percent by 2020. to sustain its growth China requires increasing amounts of oil. Its oil consumption grows by 7.5% per year, seven times faster than the U.S.'

    Growth in Chinese oil consumption has accelerated mainly because of a large-scale transition away from bicycles and mass transit toward private automobiles, more affordable since China's admission to the World Trade Organization. Consequently, by year 2010 China is expected to have 90 times more cars than in 1990. With automobile numbers growing at 19% a year, projections show that China could surpass the total number of cars in the U.S. by 2030. Another contributor to the sharp increase in automobile sales is the very low price of gasoline in China. Chinese gasoline prices now rank among the lowest in the world for oil-importing countries, and are a third of retail prices in Europe and Japan, where steep taxes are imposed to discourage gasoline use.

    Where will China get its oil?

    China’s ability to provide for its own needs is limited by the fact that its proven oil reserves are small in relation to its consumption. At current production rates they are likely to last for less than two decades. Though during the 1970s and 1980s China was a net oil exporter, it became a net oil importer in 1993 and is growingly dependent on foreign oil. China currently imports 32% of its oil and is expected to double its need for imported oil between now and 2010. A report by the International Energy Agency predicted that by 2030, Chinese oil imports will equal imports by the U.S. today.

    ---

    China’s pursuit of oil could undercut U.S. security interests on multiple fronts: In the South China Sea, China is involved in territorial disputes with Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan, Vietnam and Brunei over access to energy in the Spratly and Paracel Islands.

    In the East China Sea, where rich oil and gas reserves are believed to exist, rivalry is developing between China and Japan over access to energy resources. China has already begun the exploring process for gas reserves on its side of the East China Sea. The Japanese government claims that some of the reserves are actually on its side of the demarcation line and has accused China of attempting to extract hydrocarbons from its water. It also allowed its own oil firms to drill in the disputed territories—a move considered a provocation by China.

    Another source of tension is access to Russian oil. For many months, China and Japan have been involved in a bidding war over a major pipeline deal to deliver Russian oil from Eastern Siberia. China’s plan calls for a pipeline running to the Manchurian city of Daqing, while Japan is insisting on a pipeline that would run to Nakhodka, the Russian coastal area opposite to Japan. This tense atmosphere is feeding popular and political animosity, which have already resulted in a wave of violent anti-Japanese demonstrations in April 2005, and are likely to deepen over time.

    In Africa Chinese oil companies turn a blind eye to the way petrodollars are used by the local governments. One place where such indifference impacts America’s effort to fight against corruption and human rights abuse is Sudan. The Chinese have invested more than $8 billion in joint exploration contracts in this country, including the building of a 900-mile pipeline to the Red Sea, deployed thousands of military personnel disguised as oil workers and provided arms to the Sudanese government to support it in the country's 20-year civil war. In September 2004, the United Nations Security Council passed resolution 1564, threatening Sudan with oil sanctions unless it curbed its support for belligerent militia groups in Darfur. To protect its oil interests in Sudan, which supplies seven percent of China’s oil imports, Beijing stated very clearly that it would veto any bid to impose such sanctions.

    In the Western Hemisphere China concluded oil and gas deals with Argentina, Brazil, Peru, and Ecuador. But its main country of interest is Venezuela, U.S.' fourth largest oil supplier. A series of oil agreements signed in early 2005 allow Chinese companies to explore for oil and gas and set up refineries in Venezuela.

    Chinese state-owned oil companies have also begun seeking ambitious oil deals in Canada, the top petroleum supplier to the U.S. China’s continued penetration into the Western Hemisphere could have profound economic and political implications for the U.S. Considering the fact that both U.S.’ and Mexico’s domestic crude production are falling, the U.S. cannot afford to lose chunks of the crude produced by the two countries that together supply a third of its oil imports.

    With less oil available to the American market the U.S. will be forced to seek this oil elsewhere, primarily in the Middle East, hence becoming more dependnet on this tumultuous region.
     
  7. b12

    b12 Well-Known Member

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    If you are in the elete social statius, then you don't have to worry about all the pollution. You can afford the better things or it will be furnished for you by the people you are dictationg what they get. Its call hope and change. Wild Bill
     
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