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Botched jeweled job..any remedy?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by snkypete, Jan 24, 2011.

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  1. snkypete

    snkypete Member

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    A "gunsmith" attempted to jewel a bolt and carrier on my Model 12 and, in my opinion, botched the job. Anyone know if there might be a remedy,a way it can be redone?
     
  2. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Yes ... a good gunsmith can redo it.
     
  3. snkypete

    snkypete Member

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    Thanks Ahab. Any suggestion on a good gunsmith for the redo job?

    Any good technician out there willing to take on the job? Shoot me a PM.
     
  4. 1oz

    1oz Member

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    Talk to phil at glenrock bluing i had a bolt rejeweled i was very happy . i believe he out housed the work
     
  5. snkypete

    snkypete Member

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    Thanks to all who replied. I appreciate the help.
     
  6. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    Make sure whoever does this for you either has a jig of some sort to insure the jewels are 'inline' and correctly spaced. or will do it on amilling machine.

    I have seen a jeweled dash board on a Duesenberg that was done on a Drill Press but even they, mster machinists that they were, used a jig to get the lines strait and the spacing correct.

    Anybody that thinks they can do it by eye is either very very good or a complete fool. .01% are that good, the rest suck.

    This is one of those fine points of metal finishing that everybody thinks they can do becasue they saw the movie about Lindberg and the building of the Spirit of St Louis.(Jimmy Stewart) the cowling on that plane was hand formed (IE: beat into submission) out of Stainless sheet. It looked so bad when they got done someone came up with the idea of jeweling it with a wire wheel on a sidewinder grinder. It looks OK from a distance but when you get up close it looks like pure shit.

    By putting the part in a mill you can insure the lines are strait and if you can add and subtract you can get the spacing exactly correct very easily.

    Everything else is just guesswork. The problem is, you have to live with the results, and if its wrong it will catch your eye everytime you're around it.

    To fix it you have to sand off the offending mess and redo it. If the guy used valve lapping compound and a dowel instead of a cratex stick those jewels are going to be pretty hard to get underneath. if the surface is not completely smooth before you start the new process they old shit will show thru everytime the light is right.

    It is a very easy thing to make look like shit, but it isn't that hard to do right.

    Randy
     
  7. eightbore

    eightbore Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, there is no remedy for someone who would jewel the bolt or carrier on a Model 12. Possibly cutting off his electricity would at least slow him down.
     
  8. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    Eightbore: yes, a valid point which I definately overlooked.

    Randy
     
  9. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

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    I would like to see pics of the bolt. How bad is it?

    Some of this is due simply to taste. I've seen some "jeweled" pieces that were random and still looked good. I knew of one machinist who used toothpaste. The point is there are different ways to do it and different ideas of what it should look like. As far as I know it doesn't serve any purpose beyond looks.
     
  10. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    It is also called on to deburr parts which occurs as a by product of jeweling over the edges of a part. This is done alot in many high end watches. In most cases it is strictly cosmetic, and an interesting finish on a piece of metal if executed correctly and not over done. A little of this goes along way. I saw a Perazzi trigger group last Sunday that had been jeweled and the workmanship of the whole piece was beyond reproach. In this case3 it is a good thing.

    Other types of surface treatment include crosshatching to look like a blanchard ground finish. This is done on a belt sander, and once lines are established in one direction the part is held at a skew angle and dragged across the belt once to form the cross hatch look. I do it on aluminum parts alot.

    Also there is jitterbugging, which is done by using an orbital sander(jitterbug) This is usually done to a piece of metal that has alot of goobering, gouges, dings, etc. on the surface. It can make an abused piece of metal look quite good and can also be used to generate a "surface profile" for painting.

    Draw Filing, flatlapping, bead blasting, grit blasting, sanding while in a lathe, Scotch Brite wheels and pads, and just plain sand paper are all examples of different ways to generate a cosmetic surface, it all depends on what you want to end up with.

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and there is definately no accounting for taste, but there certainly is "established practice" which dictates what finish is appropriate for a given application. This is the reason I have a hard time "painting" a gun with anything. It just doesn't seem right. But it has been deemed perfectly acceptable to do this on a tactical gun and in fact it is considered the norm for those guns now. I saw a zillion of them at the SHOT Show. Some were black, but most others were something else, and it was all paint of some type.

    Randy
     
  11. snkypete

    snkypete Member

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    It serves no purpose, but does add to appearance (in some minds). I've had a couple of people look at the jeweling job I'm talking about and they have convinced me that it is not that bad.

    I will just go with it for now. Thanks for everyone who replied. I appreciate you input. This is an excellent site for sharing informtion.
     
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