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Bore Sighters

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by smthro06, Sep 8, 2013.

  1. smthro06

    smthro06 Member

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    Location:
    Jeffersonville, Pa.
    Does anyone have a recommendation for an accurate bore sighter? I want to be able to make minor stock adjustments and use it to aim at a point of reference at home before I can get to the patterning board. I've seen a number of different items available and if anyone has had a good experience with one, I'd appreciate your input.

    Thanks,

    Scott Felix
     
  2. Dr A C Jones

    Dr A C Jones Member

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    I suggest you go to the pattern board first and find out where the pattern lands wrt to the rib/beads. You could then set up a laser bore sighter to match the measurement.

    There's absolutely no reason why chamber mounted laser or a muzzle mounted laser should point where the pattern lands. They might, but might not. Best not to to be cutting wood until you know for sure.

    Andrew.
     
  3. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    My Laser Shooter from the Robert Louis Company works well for me. What I have seen in the hallway of our condo is what I have gotten from numerous guns on a board at 13 yards.


    averaged_2008_030351.jpg


    Their stock-fitting Combo Gauge gets you in the ballpark with stock adjustments, too. But shooting targets is always where the final decision is made.

    Ed
     
  4. waverider

    waverider Well-Known Member

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    With all of my shotguns with an adjustable stock I just adjust the stock based on the alignment of the beads, with my sporting clays gun that has only the front bead, how much rib I was seeing. I then go shoot and do the final adjustment.

    Before you spend any money try a Maglite with tape to fit your muzzle if Andrew and I have not convinced you a bore sighter is not needed.

    I do use a muzzle type bore sighter with my center fire guns, more to confirm that the scope is still set to where it should be.

    Jason
     
  5. smthro06

    smthro06 Member

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    Location:
    Jeffersonville, Pa.
    Just some additional info on why I initiated this forum. I recently tried to replace my recoil pad with a more recoil forgiving pad and knocked my adjuster out of alignment when doing it. Prior to that, I started a slump where my singles scores went from 96+ to the high 80's in a very brief amount of time (about 2 weeks after a vacation layoff). My hits went from disintegrating to fragmentation and it's getting concerning. I feel that my bead/eye alignment is proper but I'm finding that the further I get in an event, the more my gun cants inward. My interest in the bore sighter is to be able to do more work at home in preparation for the range. Being a scientist by profession, I am looking to be able to do my own experimenting during time away from the club. My intention is to use a bore sighter as a check when practicing gun mount and when adjusting my comb or recoil adjuster as needed. I think I'll find this especially helpful in the winter since I shoot all year and have consistency problems when wearing heavier clothes. LOP needs to be changed with the addition of about 3/4" of clothing here in the northeast when January comes around. My belief is that if I can find a unit that is consistent when placed in the muzzle multiple times, then I can learn more about the stock changes and gun mount consistency that I mentioned above. If the beam is strong enough to project onto the patterning board at 20 yards, I think I can reasonably be able to make estimations at home as to where the gun might impact after a change is made. The info regarding the POI of the chamber mounted models is exactly the kind of opinion that I was looking for. I'm looking for a model that will give the closest replication of the true POI. Obviously, nothing replaces going to the patterning board or hitting targets but I think our township might frown upon that idea. (needed to insert some smart-assery)

    Ed - thanks for the response. We discussed this topic before and you even mentioned our conversation in your column of Shotgun Sports. I think I might need to get that unit that you mentioned just so your reporting is accurate!

    Everyone, please keep the responses coming. We scientists can never have too much data~
     
  6. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    "I feel that my bead/eye alignment is proper but I'm finding that the further I get in an event, the more my gun cants inward."

    You may have your answer with your statement above? As you tire and attack a clay, the fit is changing regardless of what it looked like when you called?

    I'd also check the pitch, toe out (or cast off if you have that built in the stock) and length just to make sure also! You may not have a poi problem, may be a fit problem?

    HAP
     
  7. smthro06

    smthro06 Member

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    Hap,

    That's definitely what I'm trying to determine. The stock on my gun is fairly neutral with the ability to adjust cast only by moving the recoil pad laterally by maybe 1/4' overall. I think I have little choice but to get a custom stock with substantial cast and drop settings. I shoot an older Kolar that I bought about 3 months ago and was smoking targets for the past 2 months with it. Now, something is definitely off. My gun mount is more on my collar bone in order to see down the rib and it's giving me what looks like road rash in that area. I mounted a new Kolar at the Pa. State Shoot which had their # 4 stock on it and it fit like a glove. Lots of pitch, cast and drop and it fell in place every time when mounting it with my eyes closed. No head movement was required to achieve my cheek weld and I can only imagine what it must feel like to shoot a setup like that. I'm probably going to check with the Wenig and Kolar people and look into options. Thanks for the input.

    SF
    smthro06_2012_28094.jpg
     
  8. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    SF, trap shooters are notorious for "fitting themself" to a new to them shotgun!! It's fairly evident to me that's what you've managed to do also, for at least two months? An ill fitting stock will never allow a shooter to attain his best shooting consistancy form. We get tired and our muscles will change from shot to shot in an attempt to make things better! Sometimes we read that as a flinch or some other malady such as a POI problem??

    Sounds to me like you need the stock off the one you tried earlier?? No amount of money spent on "fixes" that others may think you have will help you long term. Unless that fix happens to be a fit to you stock. Once you have that potential problem out of the way, then if something else pops up, you know it isn't a fit issue!

    HAP
     
  9. waverider

    waverider Well-Known Member

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    Now that we have the rest of the story. Call Kolar and have them send you a #4 stock that will fit your Kolar.

    You may have missed an opportunity at the PA shoot. Kolar may have had #4 stocks for sale, or if you pleaded and begged, they may have let you buy the one off of the new gun on the last day of the shoot.

    Jason
     
  10. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Dick, I've used a deprimed 12 ga. hull and a 20 ga deprimed to do that same thing. Those small holes act as peep-sights and is pretty accurate telling you the difference between the bead and center of the bore is. Using only those peep sights at distance will show the charge actually drops in relation to the center of the bore.

    HAP
     
  11. rooferbob

    rooferbob Active Member

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    This is the most accurate one that I have found.
    Rooferbob



    rooferbob_2008_030381.jpg
     
  12. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Mike, the Laser Shooter has muzzle inserts in sizes to fit all gauges and the .410 bore and each has spring-loaded brass balls that keep the inserts centered, so misalignment should not be an issue.

    Ed
     
  13. smthro06

    smthro06 Member

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    Location:
    Jeffersonville, Pa.
    Thanks for all of the input from everyone. I did some research on the differences between the Kolar # 4 stock and the Wenig HC2 and the Kolar has a more dramatic difference in all of its dimensions. The website references
    1 5/8, 1 5/8, 3 1/4, 0, 1/2, 3/4, 4 and 14 3/4 for the 2 comb dimensions, heel, cast, offset, toe, grip length and LOP of the Kolar. The Wenig statement as seen on the website is the following:

    Approximate dimensions for the New American Style are 1-3/8 x 1-3/8 x 2-1/2 x 14-1/4 with a 1/4" offset comb and a 3/8" toe out (no offset at heel). This style also features a palm swell and 3" grip length from back of trigger guard.

    My only concern is with the huge change in overall dimensions but my thinking is that I've been forcing a less than optimal fit to work for me. Anyone else out there made such a big change? How about your results?

    Thanks,

    SF