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Blueing old rifle

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by kgp912kgp, Sep 23, 2011.

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  1. kgp912kgp

    kgp912kgp Active Member

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    Aug 29, 2011
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    Hi guys, this weekend I am preparing to re blue an old Rem model 33 22lr. I found this rifle in terrible shape and attempted to reblue it but still had some rust pull through the blueing. I am begining with a 400 grit paper working all the way down to 1500 grit paper. Then using a 000 steel wool to help polish before the blue goes on.

    Does anybody have any tips to help get a quality finish? I have a set up of Birchwood Casey blueing kit.

    Any tips would be greatly appreciated...
     
  2. tinylo

    tinylo TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    This is certainly a curve ball, but my advice would be to rust blue it. The Birchwood Casey cold blue leaves a grey-green appearance that smells bad forever. The time you spend polishing to 1500 grit will take as much time as polishing to 220 grit then rust bluing. There are many tutorials on the net.

    Below is an image of a set of barrels I recently did with rust blueing. This finish blows away anything I've done previously with Birchwood Casey stuff.

    Rusty


    20110325174420.jpg
     
  3. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Apply the cold bluing using a small pad of 0000 steel wool. HMB
     
  4. 870

    870 Well-Known Member

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    I've never had any luck with cold bluing. Applied with steel wool, cloth pads, cold metal, heated metal, you name it. Never looked great to begin with, but real problem was it didn't wear well at all. Tried BC as well as Oxpho Blue.

    YMMV
     
  5. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    I prefer cold bluing for touch-up. Large areas are hard to get uniform, because of the varied times that the chemicals are on the metal. As stated above you have to keep the chemicals moving over the matal for them to be effective. Cold bluing results depends on the steel. Also the steel has to be completely clean of any oil. I use acetone and go over it with a clean rag several times. I would suggest rust, or salts bluing also. It does last longer and is more appealing. Problem is, it is pretty involved. So it depends on how important looks are. Jon
     
  6. wm rike

    wm rike Member

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    Jul 19, 2007
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    I'm with Rusty on this one. Read up on rust bluing (more durable, better looking), then take the metal down to 220 or maybe 320 if you're fanatic. If you haven't done this kind of work before, a surface with no tooth (i.e., 1500 + polish) won't want to take the solution evenly and can give you fits.
     
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