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Bleaching a stock ????

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by 2@8lo, Mar 1, 2008.

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  1. 2@8lo

    2@8lo TS Member

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    I am making a stock for my sons Beretta 686 I bought a black walnut new american blank from Wenig and have it ready to go.My son was looking it over and asked if we could make it lighter in color before putting a finish on it.I usually use tru-oil to finish and that darkens the wood a little.A friend of mine gave me a wood bleaching product that is a 2 part solution that you have to mix before brushing it on.What I was wondering was has anyone ever bleached a stock, will this weaken the wood, will this lighten up black walnut and what would happen when I put the tru-oil on it or should I use another type of finish in order to keep the lighter look. I know he wants more of a Blonde look, is this possible with black walnut or should I have gotten a different type of wood .
    Thanks
    Jim
     
  2. dbl20

    dbl20 TS Member

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    Commonly-used bleaching agents such as sodium hypochlorite, sodium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide not only alter the color of wood, they are used as industrial pulping agents, particularly the sodium hydroxide - they cause fiber separation by chemically breaking down the adhesive that holds the wood together. However, the degree of breakdown depends on concentration of the chemicals, size of the wood piece, time in contact with the chemicals, and temperature. So, a quick treatment such as brushing on and allowing to drain would not degrade the bulk of the wood or the top layers if the bleaching agent is not allowed to remain on the wood surface for very long. My own experience with a Korean War vintage M-1 indicates that a gunstock is not a wood chip and that bleaching with a paintbrush is not nearly so severe a treatment as immersing wood chips in a heated pulp digester. Any damage will be superficial and removed by light sanding. My Garand came out looking like a piece of Balsa wood, so, a light stain will probably be in order. Jon Sharp
     
  3. 2@8lo

    2@8lo TS Member

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    Jon:You mention time in contact and if the bleaching agent is not left on the surface to long, so are you saying if I brush this solution on let it sit for a period of time do I then have to take the bleaching agent off somehow? What is the best way to take it off? Rinse it in water,or wipe it with a wet rag or should I just brush on a thin coat and let it air dry? Am I getting into more than I should since I really know very little about wood or does it just sound complicated? I thought that making the stock would be beyond my capabilities but found that once I started and took my time it wasn't as involved as I once thought and I infact quite enjoyed it. Any info you can give is appreciated.
     
  4. Jerry944t

    Jerry944t Well-Known Member

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    You may be getting in over your head. I just found this article and you may want to read it before you start the project.

    http://antiquerestorers.com/Articles/SAL/Bleach.htm

    Jerry
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Google search for bleaching gun stocks with oxalic acid<br>
    <br>
    Oxalic acid solution is used to safely bleach gun stocks. Click the link and do some studying on this process.<br>
    <br>
    If you bleach the stock too much, you can darken it without stains by suspending it horizontally in a box over saucers of 28% chlorine. This is stronger than ordinary household chlorine. The box should be air tight and the stock should remain in it ten hours.
     
  6. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Tru Oil (which is not true oil)contains a stain that makes the wood darker. Why not use a finish that does not have a dark stain mixed in?

    Pat Ireland
     
  7. 2@8lo

    2@8lo TS Member

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    Pat: Do you have any suggestions or recommendations for a finish that doesn't have a dark stain mixed in? That sounds like the best way, I just dont know what to use that would hold up good on a stock. I have only done one other stock before this and I liked the way the Tru-oil went on and really liked the way it dried to a hard shiney topcoat,if I could find something like that but with out the darker stain that would be great. And thanks in advance for the info.
     
  8. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    If you like a high gloss try some automotive clearcoat.





    Jim
     
  9. dbl20

    dbl20 TS Member

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    2@8LO - Pat is right about Tru Oil, cannot say I was happy with it. Here is a formula, which yields much better results:
    WHITEYS TIMBER POLISH
    Part One. Sand up to 400-600 grade paper & rub with 0000 steel wool. Mix equal parts of raw Tung oil, boiled linseed oil & satin poly-urethane. Rub oil mix into timber with clean, soft cloth. Rub well in & then remove all excess oil with clean cloth. Repeat this 3-4 times.
    Part Two. Mix equal parts of raw Tung oil & boiled linseed oil in a small pot & place inside a larger pot. Pour water into the larger pot until half way up the outsides of the smaller pot. Then place onto hot plate & heat up the oil mix slowly. When warm, place a handful of shredded beeswax into the oils, & when all the wax has melted, remove from heat. Stir until cooled (usually takes 2 beers) & then keep this creamy mix in an airtight jar. This will keep indefinitely.
    Rub this into timber 3-6 times (depends on project) & make sure you remove all excess oil. This method of polishing furniture dates back to the 18th century & was handed down to me by my Father (Master Craftsman). Remember to soak all oily rags in water after use, as they can self-combust, (& burn down the bloody workshop). This polish will repel water, red wine, coffee & hot plate stains. It gives the warmest, earthy, touching feel to anything you will ever see. It invites people to touch your furniture, as nature intended. - Whitey

    My initial mix was 6 oz. of Tung oil, 6 oz. boiled linseed and one oz. bees wax, the more coats you put on the darker it gets. I skipped part one with the polyurethane, as I felt it may inhibit oil penetration of subsequent coats. There is also the possibility of using a larger quantity of bee’s wax, which I will try on my next stock.
    Back to your question on contact time….I use Kleen Strip’s two-part Wood Bleach, they recommend letting it dry between applications, then neutralizing with a solution of 1 part vinegar and two parts water. Not being too good at following directions, I simply hung the stock from a wire over a pan and continually brushed on the combined solution until the wood looked good. Then rinsed it off in the sink. WARNING …. Do not let your wife catch you with her cheese grater and stainless steel mixing bowls. This will result in severe, prolonged hardship. Jon Sharp
     
  10. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Yes I have bleached several stocks- and it will work fine- sand the surface when you are done-- stain if it comes out too light for you

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I would first fill the pores with a sanding sealer. Put on several coats and sand back down to the wood. Keep doing this until you can hold the stock up to the light and not see any indentations of the pores in the wood. This can take many coats but they dry fast and sand easily. Sanding with a good 120 to 150 grit paper is OK. After you have a completely filled and smooth stock, sand with 180, 220, 2260 grit paper then lightly buff with 0000 steel wool. Next, 4-6 coats of Tung Oil will finish the stock. Remember, you can't get a flat, smooth finish unless all of the wood pores are filled first. If you apply the Tung Oil and you do not have a glass smooth finish, sand back down and put on more sander sealer. Total working time is about 3-4 hours. Total time required to complete the job is 3-5 Summer days and 9-12 Winter days. I liked to put a small screw in the butt, wrap a wire around it and hang the wood in the Sun to dry.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. dbl20

    dbl20 TS Member

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    For those who do not want to polymerize their own Oil go to:

    www.sutherlandwelles.com/

    Check out their exterior grades, they make many fine Tung Oil products of a higher quality than can be found at Home Despot or Lowes.

    Pat - No wonder you never leave your K gun in the rack. Jon
     
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