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Black Cherry for Gun Stocks

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Cedar Valley, Jan 31, 2008.

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  1. Cedar Valley

    Cedar Valley TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    I have a Black Cherry Tree in my front yard that is ailing and too close to the power line. It has to come down. Would it be suitable to use for a gun stock? If so, does anyone have suggestions as to the length I should cut the pieces?

    How long should the wood be cured and any other tips would be appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.

    Bill Malcolm's brother!
     
  2. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I like cherry wood for furniture but it lacks the interesting figure I like to see in gun stocks. If you have any saw mills around and the wood is good, you can cut it into 10 foot logs and sell them. The price they will bring is not enough to warrant the work involved. If you want to use the wood for gun stocks, first cut the logs to about 8 foot logs, seal the ends and then get some good books describing how to properly air dry wood. In 2-4 years, you could have the wood ready.

    Pat Ireland
     
  3. RLC323

    RLC323 Member

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    Black cherry usually has a pretty straight grain and not much detail, but makes good gunstocks and furniture. If you prefer wood with straight grain, some do, it would be worth the efort. Plus an old favorite tree in your yard put to a new use as a custom stock, could have some sentimental value to you. I recall in the 70's cherry was somewhat popular on the Model 12's and 870's of that time. If finished with a light stain it can be quite handsome.

    If you plan to sell the timber the price for cherry saw logs is always good. Unfortunately it is rare to see a good cherry saw log in someone's yard. Most times the best logs come from the deeper part of the woods. If you know a timber buyer have him take a look at it to get an idea of worth, since it has to come down anyway, you may as well.
     
  4. Cedar Valley

    Cedar Valley TS Member

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    Thanks for the information and suggestions gentlemen. I just may keep a few chunks and see what comes out of it in a few years.

    Regards,

    Steve Malcolm
     
  5. oldgahchamp

    oldgahchamp Active Member

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    Most sawmills will not be interested in ANY kind of wood from a "front yard" as there is too much of a chance it could have nails, staples, etc. If you do get someone to cut it up for timber, veneer, gunstocks, etc, tell them where it came from or they may want you to pay for a damaged blade. Larry Evans
     
  6. RLC323

    RLC323 Member

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    Mentioning things imbedded in saw logs reminded me of an incident about 25 years ago.

    My late father-in-law was a contactor and at the time was up in his years but still took on a few small jobs for coffee money. I would help him on the weekends mainly for a few bucks and the fun of hanging out with him. Years before he had built a metal building that housed a sawmill owned by one of his cronies. One Saturday we went to the sawmill to repair the roof. According to the saw operator while cutting lumber they had hit an axe head that was imbedded in a log. It left the building through the roof, in a hurry. The operator said everyone was okay, except for his helpers pride. After the event the poor fellow had to go home and change his shorts.
     
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