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Bison meat

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by gordy h, Oct 23, 2010.

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  1. gordy h

    gordy h Active Member

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    OK Guys ,I just came back from a hunt with 400 lbs of Bison. The toughest steaks I ever tryed to chew. Whats the best way to tenderize them? Butch H
     
  2. deercreek

    deercreek Well-Known Member

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    That is a shame. Could the meat have been processed when it was still warm or cut incorrectly? I just use Aldoph's Meat Tenderizer (looks like powdered salt) and then "fork" the meat. If it is really bad it might need to be turned into cubed steak (then floured and fried---then slow cooked in gravy) or ground meat.

    Many guys have different ways and I will probably learn some of them myself off this thread.
     
  3. chuckwagoncook

    chuckwagoncook TS Member

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    Bison is very lean, you cant cook it past medium, medium-rare is much better, other wise it does get tough. Also depends on what cut of meat and how you cook it, cooking techniques would be similar as beef in the since, a roast needs long slow cooking, pot roast, stew etc. T-bone, sirloin, tenderloin, etc. can be grilled. Can grind alot of the tougher cuts, bison makes great burgers, chili and such.
     
  4. StonewallRacing

    StonewallRacing Well-Known Member

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    My father-in-law raised bison for over 20 years.

    It is the most lean, tender red meat I have ever eaten.

    Because it is so lean you must cook it rare to medium rare. If you go past medium it will dry right up to nothing.

    SW
     
  5. setool

    setool Member

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    The rare holds true for venison, caribou, etc... Never past medium rare, or it's shoe leather.

    Mark Schneider
     
  6. Trappy12

    Trappy12 Active Member

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    I'd cook it lot and slow. Bison pot roast sounds good to me.
    -Trappy
     
  7. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    This subject has come up many time at our gun club. Our resident cook (the guy who does all of our BBQ's) Says the same thing about rare to medium, for Buffalo steaks and roasts.

    As far as burgers go he claims adding beef fat, pork fat to the ground meat is the answer.

    I AM an Expert on Hamburgers as 35% of the food I have consumed in my life has been burgers with ketchup only. The FatBurger chain has consistantly the best Hamburgers going, and I have eaten most. The meat is what FatBburger is all about and their meat contains 20% fat. The secret is in the fat content. with 15-20% fat the burger will cook the inside right along with the outside. Less fat equals less heat transfered to the inside of the burger.

    If the meat is too lean it will burn on the outside before the inside is any where near done.

    This is what I have experienced everytime I have tried to cook Buffalo Burgers. Also the meat I have gotten has always been really bloody. In short all of my attempts to have a good buffalo burger have ended in abismal failure. Next time I get some buff meat I will be remixing in some beef fat to see if that is really the answer.

    Randy
     
  8. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    At the 2010 GAH I bought some fresh "rib eye" steaks from Buffalo Bob, on the grounds there. I dipped them in olive oil, sprinkled them with Montreal Steak Seasoning and grilled them on a medium set gas grill
    and finished them between rare and medium rare. Since I had about 20 at a time going on a schedule, a couple got away from me and finished with "no pink."

    All of them were tender and no leftovers. Maybe it's the cut that makes the utmost difference for grilling bison. None of the steaks had any "marbling" of fat.

    Maybe I just got lucky.
     
  9. DJM

    DJM Active Member

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    I have purchased part or all of 6 or 7 bison. When we buy the entire animal we split it between 5 or 6 housholds. The farmer that raises them tells me that they must be slaughtered between 24 and 30 months old. Those one ton buffalo you see at Yellowstone are nearly inedible. He is set up with a small butcher who slaughters it and then hangs it for 7-8 days. Also a very important step he tells me. All in all I have found the steaks inconsistent with regard to tenderness, but the flavor is always good. Some are fork tender, the next one tough. And often in the same steak one side of the bone is tender and the other side tough. The burgers are always delicous, and so are the roasts. We have several in our group that want only burger.
     
  10. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    You can CUBE the steaks and put Flour and Salt and Pepper and Brown them in an Iron Skillet and then put them in a Pressure Cooker on a rack w/ water in the bottom and pressure cook them 10-15 minutes, and they will be tender.

    I like the above method but leave them in the Iron Skillet and just add some water and turn down the heat and you have a nice gravy also.

    Or Brown as above and then put them in a large Baking Dish and put a can of Mushroom Soup w/1/2 can of Milk and bake them covered w/ Aluminum Foil for 30 minutes at 350 Degrees.


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  11. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Make sure that the bison that you buy is dry aged (not wet aged). Dry aging is the process of hanging whole sides of bison in a temperature and humidy controlled room for 14-21 days from the day of harvest. This is the old fashion way that butchers used to age meat and allows for meat to naturally tenderize.

    I buy from Twin Springs in Lineboro, MD (near my farm back there). I've never had a bad piece of Bison yet. Like others above, I like it medium rare.
     
  12. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    I bought a Marlin 1895 Cowboy Rifle in 45-70 cal. specifically for the purpose of shooting a buffalo. I obviously wanted the sporting aspect of the free range hunt, but I also want a considerable portion of the meat for my own consumption. Roasts, steaks, burgers, and stew meat for Chili Colorado, stews and soups.

    It's obvious to me that with out this thread I would have chosen the wrong critter to poke a hole in, and would have ended up with a bunch of meat to "donate" to the local homeless shelter. Since The goin rate for a meat Buff is around $2,000, and you are going to yeild 4-500 lbs of meat, choosing the right critter is key to only paying $5.00 a lb for the whole experience.

    Living in SoCal I don't get alot of chances to either eat or buy Buffalo Meat, and all that I have gotten so far has been pure crap.

    Just knowing where to look is 2/3 of the problem. Knowing what to do with it after you have it is the missing piece, and I know alot more now than I did before this thread.

    Does anyone have a source for recipes, books, Internet sites etc??

    Randy
     
  13. MtnGun

    MtnGun Member

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    We have filled our freezer with Bison for about 6 years now. The only Beef we buy is Fillet Mignon, or the occasional Chuck roast. I have never experienced the tough problems you are talking about in Steaks. We eat it rare, as we do all meats except Pork, which is done to 140 degrees internal. I get my Bison from the Catron Ranch, in Camp Crook, SD.
     
  14. gordy h

    gordy h Active Member

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    Thank you,Tryed tenderizeing with the fork, tenderizing powder, olive oil,
    and slow grilling to a pink inside and it worked great. Sure am glad I asked,
    what a big differance. Butch H
     
  15. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Great information on what you need to know before purchasing bison.
     
  16. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Same site, but lots and lots of good recipes on this page.
     
  17. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    To the original question.

    Italian dressing makes a good tenderizer and I add usually 7Up or Coke. A good Sour Mash isn't all bad either if you like that flavor.
     
  18. BigBruno

    BigBruno TS Member

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    I wish I had some bison meat. It's been a long time.
     
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