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BEST VALVE GRINDING COMPOUND? PERAZZI OR KRIEGHOFF

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by gun fitter, Jun 8, 2008.

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  1. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    I'm dead serious! Which do you prefer. As a Stockmaker and Gun refinisher I would have much less work if shooters would learn how to properly apply grease to the bearing surfaces of your gun.

    I recently had a high dollar gun which the owner had applied a coat of grease so thick to his gun that it took three paper towels to get the grease out of the barrel channel of his forend. I think there was about 1/2 oz of the stuff.
    I then had to soak it in Methyl Ethel Ketone and Lacquer thinner for two days just to get the finish to stick.

    Petroleum products destroy wood and make it almost impossible to repair cracks that the grease may have caused, finish won't stick to grease and can ruin a refinishing job.

    Remember the manufactures don't warranty wood. Treat it with some respect if you don't want a big bill.

    For all of you out there that think too much of a good thing is never enough STOP!

    When you excessively apply grease to a gun any excess attracts dirt and dirt and grease create valve grinding compound.

    Perazzi owners beware the scratches on the inside of your forend Iron are from too much grease and dirt combining and congregating in the Allen screws that hold the forend together. Same for Krieghoff the cuts in the forend iron for the cocking rods catch excess grease and dirt.

    Clean your guns and if you must use grease use it sparingly and only at the hinge and contact points.

    Don't use a half of a tube of expensive K or P grease on your 10,000 to 30,000 gun.
    a tube of grease should last years to a life time of shooting. When you see grease turning from clear to gray the gun needs cleaning the grease is contaminated. That's why I don't like the P grease it's gray and I can't tell when it needs to be changed.
    Joe goldberg
     
  2. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Banned User Banned

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    Right on about the grease changing color. A new gun will grey out the grease quickly. When it is pretty well broken in, the grease stays the original color longer.

    Obsessive types like myself remove and re apply grease every time the firearm is used. Too much is NOT good.
     
  3. Gabe

    Gabe Member

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    Joe I agree 100%. I've worked on allot of guns over the years and made my share of custom stocks. I've found the same as you. It amazes me how few people really know how to lubricate a gun. Then when you try to offer advise and tell them how to do it right they take offense. Over the years I've found it best to keep quiet and just charge extra for the oil soaked stocks I refinish. On the target shotguns I've gotten in the shop I'd say 60% or so have too much grease on them. Good post. Gabe
     
  4. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Joe, that was a very informative post and I thank you for it. I'm sure there are a lot of newer and some not-so-new shooters who learned from it.

    Using oil in place of grease has its fans, too. Many years ago, a reader asked me about that and since I had seen shooters using oil on their hinge guns, I asked Dieter Krieghoff why oil would not do a satisfactory job of lubricating a shotgun when the heat and contaminants from combustion present in an engine do not exist in a firearm. His reply was that since a shotgun does not have a pump constantly circulating oil to the gun's bearing surfaces, the thin oil film would wear through, leaving the gun unprotected.

    Ed
     
  5. claybrdr

    claybrdr Well-Known Member

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    Don't use grease for all the above reasons! Listen to Giacomo and use Tri-Flow. Absent that, use Breakfree CLP.
     
  6. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think Shooting Coach is obsessive...just the opposite, I rather think that anyone who does NOT clean grease off of their break action guns after every shooting session are just being dense.

    Its only a dollop of grease here and there, takes no time to wipe off with a rag, then reapply next time you go shooting....then don't worry about grease becoming lapping compound.
     
  7. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    Don't Kill your gun with kindness! Jeff
     
  8. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Ed,
    Today's synthetic oils like mil spec may be just the ticket. They actually penetrate in to the metal due to their smaller molecular size and they actually penetrate the metal and stay there.
    Joe
     
  9. truthseeker

    truthseeker Member

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    The only problem is that the hinge is a laod bearing surface and as such needs a high quality "sticky" grease that leaves a thin surface between the opposing surfaces. The stuff that penetrates metal is great for stopping surface rust, but I don't think it is good enough on two pieces of steel that rub with such tight tolerances. This is just my opinion!!

    I will say that I am a gun cleaning freak! I shoot every week on Thursday and Saturday at live birds (pigeons and pheasant). I shoot approximately 25 rounds on Thursday and probably 100 on Saturdays. On both of these days I fully break my gun down and clean it until it looks just like new! I know a lot of people look at cleaning their guns as something that is only needed once a year (bunch of rednecks) but since I was in the military, it made me very anal on having a clean gun.
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I use dabs of grease on all bearing surfaces. I clean my gun after each shoot. This could be after one day or this week I will shoot for five days between cleaning. i keep my cleaning mixture (kerosene/acetone/automotive transmission oil) in a small can. I hole the part over the can, use a paint brush to flood and scrub the part and let the cleaner flow back into the can. I have maintained for many years that keeping the lubricant clean, washing off the old and putting on new, is much more important than the type of lubricant that is used.

    I have also sealed all of the interior exposed wood surfaces with a sander sealer to help keep oil out of the wood. This takes less than 10 minutes and gives a lot of protection to the wood.

    The term "lubricants penetrating into the metal" can be misunderstood. It actually refers to the lubricant filling the microscopic irregularities on the surface of the metal. A typical oil/grease will be made of 20-80 carbon long chains. These molecules are much too big to actually penetrate into the steel. Gasoline is made of 5-8 carbon long chains and it is also much too large to penetrate into steel. For another molecule to go into steel, it would first have to break the bonds that hole the Fe atoms together and destroy the steel. No lubricant will flow between the Fe atoms of steel. An acid will do that but not a lubricant.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Pat, have you ever looked at a slice of steel under a microscope? Most of it looks like a sponge! I've taken bar stock and soaked it in Mobil 1 @ 270 degrees F and found the penetration to be between 5 and 12 thousanthhs. 4130 by the way. Joe
     
  12. Delbert

    Delbert TS Member

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    Like my granny used to say- if a little is good, a lot is better. She was talking about beer, but it applies to everything.
     
  13. Erik W

    Erik W Member

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    Kero/acetone/trans oil - I love these home brews - What is the theory here???
     
  14. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Erik W, CLP
     
  15. Jim Porter

    Jim Porter Well-Known Member

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    Kero/Acetone?Trans Fluid= Ed's Red and it's great! I have used it for many years on everything except cleaning black powder bores. Do one more thing though, add several bucks and buy a pound of lanolin for the drug store and add it in the mix. It's far easier on the hands and gives a little longer protection. Be careful if you do this because it has to be melted and poured into the mix and everything in there will flame! This is also a very good plastic revover from choke tubes.
    You can tell it's good on plastics because you kane to store it long term in glass jars. It will attack the plastic.
     
  16. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Delbert,
    Are you stupid?
     
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has anyone ever used valve grindingcompound to restore metal woods