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Best Shotgun for olympic trap

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by JZ, Jan 8, 2009.

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  1. JZ

    JZ Member

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    hi, i was wondering wich shotgun its the best for this discipline; normal wood and no engraving since it will be used for competition and wich features of the shotgun(lenght,stock,choke or fixed,rib,etc) name any brand that you want and any model ; i think a perazzi mx2000/3 choked with removable coil springs and 30 inches thanks for the answers
     
  2. ffwildcat

    ffwildcat TS Member

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    good question.

    when i think of how to answer this question i come back to the word best and what i believe determines best as it applies to olympic trap is a gun that shoots where you look, has a low POI ie no more than 60/40, can handle the rigors of practice and competition (hundreds of thousands of rounds), fits the shooter and allows for the necessary swing control through a wide arc.

    having said that you see a LOT of perazzi 2000 with 30" barrels in the hands of competitors. a fine gun for sure.
     
  3. Bunkershooter1

    Bunkershooter1 TS Member

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    A raised rib gun has never been proven to be a gold medal gun in Olympic Trap.
    Most international tournaments are won with 29.5" flat ribbed guns. Most international competitors shoot shorter thinner stocks than the typical American Trap gun. In my opinion it is better to get flat springs than coil. Flat springs break though so its is better to get two trigger groups. Most Olympic Trap guns have fixed chokes to help with balance.

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    As a nationally ranked Intl' shooter, I can add nothing to what has been said here.

    29 1/2" Perazzi with barrels around 1.5KG, tight fixed chokes. That is what I shoot.

    Get the leaf springs. When you are shooting ultra high performance targets with an ultra high performance firearm, you will notice the difference.

    I have spare springs, but have never broken a spring in my Perazzis. One might break the next time I shoot, but they are easily replaced on the field. If you get really serious, get a spare trigger.

    If you want to play the game, the Perazzi is the tool to use.
     
  5. SR1

    SR1 TS Member

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    I would think it would be the gun that you shoot the best but what do I know.
     
  6. Bunkershooter1

    Bunkershooter1 TS Member

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    Because bunker is a faster game that requires much more movement and speed
    than in American trap. A large bulky stock would slow a shooter down to much.
     
  7. flush-em

    flush-em Member

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    Didn't the first and second place winners in doubles win with a perazzi 2005 ?-steve
     
  8. Bunkershooter1

    Bunkershooter1 TS Member

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    A short thin stock may not be in preference in America, but if you watch issf.tv clips you will notice that many Europeans guns have low or no monte carlo and they crawl them alot compared to the average Ata shooter. Your point may be valid if you are talking about American Olympic trapshooters only.
     
  9. Mr Newbius©

    Mr Newbius© TS Member

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    Ya know it aint really the gun ... but remember that if the gun fits you properly and you have no problem swinging it and such that the question will never really be what is the best gun.

    If a friggin Stoeger or a Spartan fit you perfectly and you shot that gun better than anything else put into your hands that would be the best gun ... so what is the best gun that you have that fits the bill? Answer that question and you will find the answer to your original question.
     
  10. Mr Newbius©

    Mr Newbius© TS Member

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    "American Olympic trapshooters" ... now just what the heck are they? I aint never heard of no "American Olympic Trap" before ... can you describe how it is different from both ATA and also International Trap please?
     
  11. ESMDHokie

    ESMDHokie TS Member

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    when it was mentioned that high rib guns don't do well with the flat trajectories of bunker, would the browning citori XT Trap count as a high rib gun?

    Hokie
     
  12. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

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    Interesting post on the leaf springs; what is it about a leaf spring that be perviewed as better? Are they a faster lock time?

    Never though of that difference before.

    Also I was at Ft Benning and talked with the Master Sargent (Pinkster I believe) and I asked him about different barrel lengths and he said they gave a different perception of lead. I struggle with that concept. Can anyone comment on that?

    thanks
     
  13. Voolfie

    Voolfie Member

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    Any gun that fits, is capable of reliably delivering two quick shots - and with which you feel confident...will do.

    American trap guns do tend to be a good bit heavier than their European cousins, which *may* slow you down...BUT...if you're swinging from the ankles, that ought not exclude them from consideration. An over/under is a given - if for no other reason than reliability. While it may not be "ideal", you CAN learn how to hit low targets with a gun that shoots 70/30. I'd say anything from a Browning XT to a Beretta SO-5 will work - if you do. My $0.02...John W.

    Actually, does anyone know what guns were popular with the Olympic-style trap crowd BEFORE the advent of Perazzi? I know Krieghoffs and FN Brownings were used successfully. I expect Berettas were also. What other guns were used circa 1950-1970? I know that the Skeeters went through an 1100 phase - did the trap shooters also use the Remington semi-auto?
     
  14. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    I think you all should stop confusing a high rib with a high Point of Impact. They are two distinctly different things.
     
  15. slide action

    slide action Well-Known Member

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    A good depenable O/U choked imp/mod and full. Due to the low "worm burner targets" that you often get, most shooters shoot a 60/40 POI gun,with a wide medium hight rib. The righ ribs hender visibility and quick target accusition for the lower targets. "P" guns seem very popular with some Berettas, but I have seem some Browning shooters do quite well. Most Bunker trappers opt for barrels of roughly 30 in. or so and you see very few longer barrels.
     
  16. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

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    Dumb question: whats the real reason behind ribs?

    Arent they supposed to simply move the bbl down a bit so it doesnt block the trap house?

    If it is parallel to the bore, dont you still have a flat shooter?

    I have a Browning Citori trap (Invector, not +) model with a "high rib" but it doesnt shoot high.
     
  17. Texas Crew'd

    Texas Crew'd Member

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    The majority of International trap shooters in this country that I know shoot fitted stocks. If they shoot a Perazzi it is a hour to an hour and a half process of messurements. Most will be set up to put the thumb 1/2"-1 1/2" from the pupil. The mount will look as if the shooter is crawling up on the stock. so stock length will very depending on persons size stature ect.

    The vast majority of barrel lengths are 29.5 with some of the bigger guys swinging 32" low rib, high ribs are becoming more tested and tried though.

    The advantage of leaf over coil is time to replace. If you are "in competition" you have 3 minutes to fix or repair a gun malfunction or reshoot the round with the targets being scored up to the point of the malfunction. If you are 15 birds into the round on station 4 then you shoot the make up round begining on station 4 with the 15th bird on the same field (schemed). The computer randomly selects your targets at the beginning of the round so that each shooter gets 1 straight 2 lefts and 2 rights from each station. Once the computer is reset or round is finished it no longer is set. So if you make up your round you will get random targets on your last ten and be scored on something other than 1 straight 2 lefts and 2 rights on each station, it then becomes a percentage game on which targets may or may not be your "difficult" targets on that scheme.

    If you have 2 trigger groups it becomes a non issue and personal preference on flat vs coil.

    Garry
     
  18. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    I would submit an elite Intl' shooting athlete, piano player, or baseball player has an awareness threshold time of the difference in coil and leaf springs.

    A professional pianist can tell if he is off rhythm by several milliseconds.

    "A 90-mph fastball can reach home plate in 400 milliseconds — or four-tenths of a second. But a batter has just a quarter-second to identify the pitch, decide whether to swing, and start the process. “Once the pitch is in flight, it’s the snap of your fingers,” Zimmerman says. What happens next is “pretty much just instinct.” A batter takes 100 milliseconds to see the 3-in. ball, and 75 milliseconds to identify spin, speed and pitch location. The batter has another 50 milliseconds to decide whether to swing, and where, before he must act. It can take nearly 25 milliseconds for the brain’s signals to pulse through the hitter’s body and start his legs moving. The swing itself takes 150 milliseconds."

    The Baseball Almanac does list pitchers with pitches in excess of 103 mph, listing Mark Wohlers, Braves, 1995 with the 103.0 mph pitch at "spring training". (WOW)

    An elite Intl' shooter is as finely tuned both physically and mentally as any athlete or musician.

    Training, using, and trusting the reactive brain is cardinal in any clay target shooting, but is imperative in Olympic style.
     
  19. Baber

    Baber TS Member

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    Yes... Coiled springs might not break but they get weak and create soft hits and misfires.

    Tom
     
  20. Texas Crew'd

    Texas Crew'd Member

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    They all break and have problems, hammers,flat springs, firing pins, coil springs, Krieghoffs, Berettas, Brownings, Perazzis, Kolars, etc.

    I agree with you, it's 110% personal preference and the best ones think their gun is the best and would not trade it for anything. These elite shooters have thousands of hours spent with their gun and hundreds of thousands of rounds down the barrels. They know them intimately.

    Garry
     
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