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Best Deer Hunting Stories for the Season

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by puablo, Dec 17, 2011.

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  1. puablo

    puablo Well-Known Member

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    Seeing how the season is just about over, and we all got great stories...let's hear some of the best ones...I ended up the season seeing a real nice buck chasing a doe on the other side of a stream and swamp I was overlooking from a ridge. I had the scope on the buck, but didn't shoot because we had flooding and you couldn't get across the stream. The buck jumped the doe, and then the doe was considering crossing the stream. She put one foot in the water, and waited for awhile to decide whether she was going to cross over to the other side. After a couple of minutes she jumps in and drifts across the stream to the other side...a few seconds later the buck plunges in the water and crosses.
    Sometimes things work out in the hunter's favor. Very exciting hunt.
     
  2. puablo

    puablo Well-Known Member

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    Wow! I guess no deerhunters here...I just figured all the years of listening to the deer stories in our hunting store there should be a lot of em flying around here too. Oh, well...the doldrums of winter...Merry Christmas everybody!
     
  3. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    A friend was heading out to his favorite spot to hunt deer, when he had a "call to nature", so he pulled over and was leaning against a tree taking a dump.

    He heard a shot in the distance, and soon a deer came running up to his location and fell over. He proceeded to wipe, tag the deer, dress it out, toss it into his truck, and went home.
     
  4. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Camdenton, MO
    Merry Christmas to you too Jeff. My best story is not for deer, but an incident while archery deer hunting. The 900 acre Pike County, MO farm I've hunted on for 25 + years has tons of wild turkeys. In the Fall, they seperate in to 3 groups...hens, jakes and younger toms, and mature toms. Had a bow stand on a logging road and turkeys were coming by every day in flocks headed to a stand of white oaks. On one morning, got about 20 of them in bow range in front of me and had the sun in their eyes. About to take a shot when from behind me I heard the darndest turkey alarm I've ever heard. Turned around to see a giant old tom at attention (as he could see me and the younger group could not because of the direction of the early morning sun). He was literally screaming at the younger group to alarm them of my presence. The younger group started to exit down the ridge in single file and I could not stop them with my mouth call. As the last one started to head down the hill at a fast walk following the others I drew my bow back, put my 30 yard pin on his back and let the arrow fly. The arrow flight was mystic and flew like a lazor and hit him squarely dead center....30 yard shot while the target was moving. Earlier in the season I was in a bow stand on a slope. Across the draw on the opposite slope there were 6 old toms feeding. Along comes a coyote from right to left. The coyote acted like he didn't see the toms but as he got close to them, he attacted. I thought the toms would scatter. Instead, they all flew upwards a little and came down on the coyote. The coyote panicked and ran off yelping. Would have been priceless to have that incident on film.

    Each trip to the bow stand creates lifelong great memories for me. Hope your season was the best!



    milt
     
  5. tom berry

    tom berry Active Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Winterset, IA
    Don't know if this will sound as good reading it as it did when my son told me the story.

    17 year old son went out hunting last week after school. His 870 has a rifled slug barrel. He grabs a bunch of shells and when out in the field notices that he has a bunch of rifled slugs rather than sabots. Well, he did find two sabots in the bunch.

    He's out and sees two deer a long ways off bumping heads. He's patient and they start coming towards him. After about 20 minutes they get to within 75 yards and he decides to shoot at the larger buck. He misses. It runs a little ways and stops. He shoots again. Same result.

    So now he's out of sabots and decides that it's not worth trying the rifled slugs. But he decides to walk over to another patch where these two deer headed towards.

    He gets over there and sees some movement. First, out comes the little buck he had just seen. It stops about 20 yards from him, snorts and trots away. Then out comes the bigger buck. It runs straight towards him and stops about 10 yards away. Again, snort and trots away. THEN...out comes a wall hanger. Stops 20 yards away looks at him. Like the others, snorts and trots away.

    I'm glad he didn't try the rifled slugs. I'm sure they wouldn't have damaged the barrel, but he erred on the side of caution and I'm kind of proud of him.

    Too bad he didn't get one of those bucks though.
     
  6. Bob Griffith

    Bob Griffith Member

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    7:25 Opening day of the muzzle loader season, an 8 point appears in the shooting lane in front of my stand. He was on the move & this lane isn't very wide so I had to make a quick shot just as he went into more thick brush. After the smoke clears, I am trying to watch him in the thick brush while reloading. I can see glimpses of him here and there & I realize he has turned & headed right back at the stand. As I am getting a new cap on (the buck is now 30 feet from stand) I see his front legs start to wobble....GOOD SIGN! He got directly in front of the stand in the open & proceeded to collapse about 10 yards in front of me. Nice way to start the season!

    But Jeff, by far the best moment for me was the last Saturday of rifle season, about 4:15 when my wife called me & said "I got a shot & I am pretty sure I hit him!" Knowing her track record I said I will be right there. Made a mad dash to her as it was starting to get dusky. Took me a few minutes but I found him not 30 yards from where he had been standing when she shot. Her record of 1 shot kills with her trusty .243 remains in tact! It was a nice 5 point. Not her biggest buck, but it is always special for me when she connects each year.

    Merry Chrismas!

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  7. puablo

    puablo Well-Known Member

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    Bob, good story...nice deer for your wife...Merry Christmas to you both.
     
  8. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    S-E PA
    This year I was invited to hunt on a 2,500 acre farm.

    The weather was brutal - sunny but really windy and we were hampered with a white rental truck (did you know deer really hate white trucks??) that sent the deer fleeing anytime we approached an area to hunt (no, we were NOT hunting from the truck).

    We saw a lot of deer on the move (i.e., running) but few walking or standing. None were close. There are stands on the property and we tried several of them, as well as some walking in areas known to hold deer - NADA!

    Did see one Houdini deer - really nice buck that dropped into a creek bed about 300 yards out from our stand. I could see the whole creek - all entrances and exits - watched until sunset - finally walked up to it but never saw him again - I really dislike Houdini deer...

    There is a small train on the property (don't ask) and I even tried a ride in that to get to an area to hunt. I figured that A) the deer were used to the train and B) it wasn't white... Didn't see a single deer on that trip.

    About two hours before we left for the airport we drove around one last time and saw a small group of deer (yes, they too were running). One decided to stop to look at us. I had time to jump out of the truck (lost my orange hat), load my rifle, find a tree for a rest and fire a shot.

    This process felt like it took about five minutes. Guy with me just about peed himself at the speed I did this in. His recollection was about 1.5 seconds... He was telling me he thought it might be worth getting out to try and take the shot when he heard the BANG! Hadn't realized I was already on the move. Time flies when you're having fun.

    Paced off the shot was about 125 yards - nice head shot on a small buck.

    Did manage to get blood all over my clean 'travel' pants - got a few looks at the airport while sitting at the bar waiting for the flight...

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    -

    Forgot to mention that we got the truck stuck and a flat tire for our efforts.

    I do not like white trucks and deer, I do not like them there or here... I do not like them in the muck, I do not like them when they're stuck... I do not like them without air, if you do like them I don't care...

    Merry Christmas to all!
     
  9. avery53

    avery53 Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    Here's one from a few years ago. Being it's almost Christmas, it is about honor and sportsmabship.
    Sitting on a ridge in the hardwoods, leaves on the ground were nice and crunchy, and you could hear anything moving.
    Squirrels were giving me lots of excitement romping around making lots of noise, thinking each one was a buck coming through the woods.
    After about an hour, I was getting lax on checking out mu squirrel buddies.
    Hearing another one hopping along, I glanced down below me, and damn, there's a nice 8-point trotting along.
    Whipped up the 30-30 and got off a quick shot, he took off like a scalded dog.
    Went down and started trailing him. About 100 yds up the hill, I ran into a hunter sitting against a tree, and asked if he had seen the buck come through. He just shook his head and pointed about 25 feet from him to the dead buck, shot squarely through the heart. (How do they run that far when heart shot?)
    He had heard the shot, then shortly the buck came charging right to him. He raised his gun, took aim, and the buck collapsed at that moment.
    He could have fired a shot and claimed that buck, which was a real beauty, my second best ever.
    I could not have proved I was the one that shot it. He was a true sportsman, and I think of this often. A rare thing these days. He even helped me drag it out.
    Maybe not exciting, but one that I remember as my best hunt.

    avery
     
  10. omgb

    omgb Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I was hunting deer on a ranch outside of Coffee Creek MT. It was raining lightly and just a tad above freezing. I was coming up a trail with heavy timber in front of me and a wheat field on my left. About 50 yards ahead of me a deer, nice buck, walks out of the field and stops broadside to me on the trail. I fired one quick off-hand shot and hit him just behind the front leg. The amazing this is what happened next....he vanished in a cloud! Just poof! and he was gone. It looked like one of those "I Dream of Genie" episodes where she nods and a cloud of smoke remains and she's gone. I walked up the trail to where he had been standing and found him dead on the ground. The shot had hit him so hard that it turned all of the rain on his coat to steam/vapor and created a cloud. it was too weird to fully appreciate at the time. After that I loaded all of my 30-06 rounds to 30-40 Krag velocity. No more clouds and the deer were just as dead.
     
  11. BigBadBob

    BigBadBob TS Member

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    About 20 years ago I was bowhunting a farm in Pike County Missouri. The first evening I hunted this farm, I took a very large doe. I wasn't crazy about shooting does, but the landowner had a severe deer problem, and wanted tags filled. I had made a good shot on the doe ( I thought at the time) but was unable to locate her that evening. The underbrush was so thick that at times I was on hands and knees just to stay on the trail.I did find her the next morning however.

    The next year, remembering how terribly thick the cover was on that farm, I started practicing with a string tracker. I practiced and practiced until I was very confident to 20 yards with the string on the arrow. Finally the wind was right to hunt that stand and soon after climbing in a deer walked under me. A few minutes later I noticed a nice buck coming towards me from the corn. I readied my bow, and when the proper time came, I drew and released. It sounded like a rifle had gone off. My arrow flew right under the boiler-room. I then noticed that I had failed to pull the plug out of the string canister.
    I nocked another arrow and did not hook the string to it,figuring my one and only chance for that hunt was over. About 10 minutes later, the same buck was coming right down the path he had taken earlier. I thought this was going to be easy, I know why I missed the first time and knew all that was left was to put my tag on him.

    When the time came, I drew, aimed, and released. I heard that same loud crack, and the deer was gone. I honestly was not sure where the arrow went. I sat there for about an hour and as I started to get down, I heardd leaves crunching and lots of rustling in the direction the deer had gone. I waited a while longer and could not stand it any longer. I climbed down, nocked another arrow and turned in the direction of the noise. There stood the buck, 20 yards away. He looked like a horse that was sleeping standing up. I took a couple of steps so I could get a clear shot at his vitals. Now, the third arrow let the wind out of him, but he was still standing. I started walking toward him thinking that if he took off he would not go far. When I got to within a couple of feet of him, he was standing there with an entry and exit wound and blood was pouring out. I put my hand on his rump and he fell over. I found the 2nd arrow as I drug him to the edge of the field.

    After I finished the field dressing I was holding each antler in my hands and admiring the rack. ( 18" inside, and 10 nice points) I noticed his upper eyelid on his right eye was injured. After looking at the 2nd arrow I had shot ( the first missed) it was broken right behind the insert. Thinking to myself and replaying the shot, I stuck my fingers inside his mouth. I felt the end of my broadhead. He must have turned his head to bolt when I shot. I was aiming at his left side and had hit him in his right eye. That explained why I was able to walk right up on him after the third shot.

    When I got home, I caped out the head and 2 of the 4 blades had penetrated the brain cavity.
     
  12. LAD39

    LAD39 Member

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    Merry Christmas Jeff and to all. Bob
     
  13. Citori Shooter

    Citori Shooter TS Member

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    Hmmm...Hunted several days with my daughter. Saw one tail as the deer ran away at a distance. Typical PA hunting these days, just out taking a rifle for a walk.
     
  14. jeffprigge

    jeffprigge Active Member

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    I seen deer having sex twice in the same morning , 30 years of deer hunting never seen that til opening day rifle season in Ky. and then to see it twice .
     
  15. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    HSLDS, Now I know why I haven't seen any deer this year. I drive a white truck most of the time. Unfortunately, I haven't seen anything when I was driving my blue truck. LOL I will park futher away next time and see if that works. Jackie B.
     
  16. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Shooting Jack,

    The farm has two trucks - one dark blue, one dark green - and the deer could have cared less if one drove by.

    Two years ago when I was there we had a dark truck as well, and again the deer could have cared less. We each brought home two deer that year.
     
  17. Haskins Bill

    Haskins Bill TS Member

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    So an eight point and a six point and a button buck are having a chat when across the meadow out comes a twelve point. Well the eight says you know I might just have too many does maybe I will let him have three of my six. The Six says you know I have four does maybe I will let him have two of mine. Well the button just runs across the meadow and piss all over the twelves scrape and chews off the licking branch and comes trotting back. The eight and the six both say what the hell was that all about? The button says I just want that big sumbitch to know that I am a buck!!!
     
  18. BROWNST100

    BROWNST100 Member

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    Location:
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    I got to spend the first day with an old friend, in the woods. We have been friends since school, went in the Army in late 69 together, spent time together at Ft. Campbell, then got seperated and we didn't see each other till 72. Since that time we have been hunting and fishing together every year.

    Health reasons, for both of us, keep us from hunting like we used to, so we set together and did more gabbing and laughing and remissing. Neither of us really cared if we saw a deer.

    Those kind of times are priceless and being out in nature is like icing on the cake.

    Vern
     
  19. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    One more time...

    Three years ago I was at the same farm (odd that they let me come back this year, if you think about it...).

    I took a Sako rifle chambered in 300 Weatherby - yeah, I know - overkill for whitetail, but I'd never shot an animal with it and thought it should be properly christened.

    Now anyone who has shot a 300 W/M will tell you it has a fair bit of recoil, so the first thing you do is put on a muzzle brake. To the un-enlightened a muzzle brake reduces recoil by deflecting some of the hot gases out in some sort of radial pattern. The really good ones even direct some backwards to help 'pull' the gun forward against the recoil energy.

    I was sitting in a tower - about 12 by 12 with windows on all sides - really plush with carpet and chairs...

    I need to interject here that I do a good bit of hunting in the UK and there you shoot with moderators on the rifles so as not to disturb the neighbors during tea time... hold this thought.

    Well, I am set - all comfortable in my stand waiting for deer. A lovely young buck walked by and I enjoyed watching him frolic beneath the tower. Suddenly he bolted and was soon replaced by a nice ten point buck entering the same field. I waited patiently - checked my equipment, round up the spout, safety off, scope covers off, ear plugs right on the window sill, range to deer - 95 yards. PERFECT.

    Now recall that I said this was a plush tower. So plush in fact that the roof overhangs were extended so that when you put your rifle out to shoot the eves were set so as to keep rain off even the longest barrel, and also recall that I do some hunting in the UK - with a moderator... So I line up the shot, just behind the head - neck shot at the base of the skull, and gently squeeze the trigger.

    Can you say 'OH $#!T???

    I forgot to use the earplugs (dam those noise sensitive Brits), and the muzzle brake worked wonders - under that overhanging roof - directing hot gases out and back some where near space shuttle velocities and volume. Dust, spider webs, and small rodents went flying. My ears imploded, exploded, and stopped working all in about 1/1000 of a second. My first reaction was to grab my ears - which risked dropping the rifle 50 feet to the ground (screw the rifle at this point - I am in PAIN!!!).

    Through the ringing developing in my head (lasted three days) I some how managed to not drop the rifle (thank you Lord).

    Deer did go down, but so did I...

    PS - I forgot to mention that despite the orbital insertion velocity of the blast those damned ear plugs sat right on the sill and never once moved - talk about adding insult to injury

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  20. puablo

    puablo Well-Known Member

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    Good story! You should be writing sport's stories, very good story telling!
     
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