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Best bullet feeder on the market for a Super 1050

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by andybull, Jan 2, 2011.

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  1. andybull

    andybull Active Member

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    I'm going to install a PW Electric Drive on a Dillon Super 1050. What is the best bullet feeder I can buy?

    Thanks,

    Andy
     
  2. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    With good coordination, you can operate the press and feed bullets by hand faster than any power assist or bullet feeder can run. You also retain the feel of what is going on in the press.

    Ask me how I know this. Several million loaded on this 1050, and just about broke in.
     
  3. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    I'll second what Coach said.. I use and run a pair of Dillon 1000.. I use to load commercially.. usually 3500/5000 shells per night... EVERY night for many years.. With auto primer tube filler..and a well layed out workbench..1200 rounds per hour is not difficult.. BUT.. when you have a jam..and feel it.. and stop.. you will save hours of work.. Any power feed on the unit would make huge problems.. I can't speak for the 1050.. as I've never loaded on one.. but I think it would be similar..
     
  4. warpspeed

    warpspeed Member

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    From Mr. Bulletfeeder

    see link above.
     
  5. RickN

    RickN Well-Known Member

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    Coach or Mike, I'm in the market for either a 650 or a 1050. I see you have one of each. It would be for mainly pistol rounds and maybe some .223

    Which one would you advise?
     
  6. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    RickN , I have never used a 650 but I have a 1050. The 650 came out after I bought the 1050. I have loaded 223's on mine but gave it up. The powder spilled out the the casings as the turret rotated no matter how careful I was. It made a mess. The 1050 is an excellent machine and you can really crank out the rounds but changing calibers is a slow process. Unless you shoot an extreme amount of one caliber you may be better of with the 650 or the 550. I think most would be better off with the 550.

    I absolutely agree with shooting coach about automation, you lose the "feel" for what is happening. I can load shotshells faster than any hydraulics and I can stop immediately if something does not feel right. Well, for the first 100 anyway.
     
  7. capvan

    capvan Active Member

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    Dillon strongly recommends against putting power on their machines. They feel the "feel" you have is all-important when operating it.

    I've got a 550B and have loaded thousands of rounds on it. Lots of pistol calibers and 4 rifle calibers. I have the case feeder for the pistol stuff.

    I have a friend with a 650, case feeder and bullet feeder. He says he likes it, but I don't think it's much faster than manually feeding the bullets. Pull the handle, put a bullet in, pull the handle, put a bullet in...Doesn't get much easier or faster. The only thing that would get me to switch to the 650 would be the need for a case feeder for .223. But there's a LOT more expense involved with the 650 (or 1050).

    And Dillon's no BS guarantee does NOT apply to the 1050...

    Having said all that, I guess I've heard the Mr. Bullet feeder is about the best.

    cap
     
  8. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    You need to think about how much ammo you are going to load, and what kind of components you are going to use. When using a progressive press, one must use a dense powder that does not fill the case. Doing otherwise will produce bad ammo due to powder spillage.

    Dillons get indigestion with Federal primers. Some lots of Wolf primers will jam in the primer tubes. These presses and the Dillon Primer Tube Filler work best with Winchester primers.

    The main advantage of the 1050 is the primer pocket swager. When loading 9X19, 40, and 45 Auto, this is a deal breaker. When loading 40, I presize with a Magma case sizer.

    Also, much 223 brass has crimped primers.

    The bad thing about the 1050 is initial cost, cost of conversion kits, and time required to service and change calibers. Dillon says the learning curve for a 1050 is around 30,000 rounds. I typically take about 1 1/2 hours to disassemble, service, and swap parts for different calibers and primer size.

    A complete conversion kit for the 1050, including shellplate, conversion kit, and Dillon Carbide dies will get close to $300.

    The GOOD thing about the 1050 besides the primer swaging feature is pure speed.

    The 650 is a great machine, primes on the upstroke, which requires an experienced feel, where the 1050 primes on the downstroke and is a mechanical adjustment.



    Dillon presses do not like mediocre brass, and the 650 will not handle hulls with crimped primer pockets.

    I use the 1050 for large runs of ammo, and the 650 for limited runs. I personally use the 650 to finish prepared, processed, sized, trimmed and primed rifle brass in 223/5.56, 308/7.62, and 30/06.

    If you are going to use good brass, and are willing to sort by headstamp and either cull or prepare military style brass, the 650 will work very well.

    Check out the above forum. Loads of info and answers to your questions.

    My advice is, if you are going to load buckets of ammo of the same caliber, the 1050 is for you. If you are going to load 500-1000 rounds per caliber weekly, the 650 is the way to go. It is monumentally quicker to change calibers and primer sizes, but does not do crimped primer pockets.

    (Corrected for having brain flatulence LOL)
     
  9. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    Coach,
    Is that the standard powder tube on a 1050 or is that aftermarket? Where can I get one and what would it cost. Thanks for any response.
     
  10. claybrdr

    claybrdr Well-Known Member

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    Can't agree with the statement that Dillons don't like Federal primers. I load tons of 9mm on my 650 with Fed 100s with nary a primer issue.
     
  11. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Listen to Coach.

    My 1050's are dedicated machines. I am lazy. I do not change calibers.

    I use Federal SP primers in the .38 Spl (need a primer that will work with light firing pin hits on tuned SAA guns) and they work well; Winchester LPs in the .45 ACP with no issues. I will not use CCI or "imports". A "bad" batch of primers will really drive you nuts.

    A bullet feeder is not a good investment. Spend the money on a primer filler if speed is important to you. (I have 20 tubes as I am too cheap to buy a primer filler and I need a rest after loading 2000) None of the bullet feeders are recommended with cast bullets. If shooting enough to need a 1050, you will want to load cast bullets to keep costs down - well - at least I need to keep costs down.

    Unless you have a physical issue, the electric drive makes little sense. It will likely slow you down if you are looking for speed.

    Don Verna
     
  12. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    I run a pair of Dillon 1000's.. One in large primer.. 1 in small primer.. With 11 complete tool heads.. I can change calibers in about 10 minutes..IF I have a tool head set up..

    I fully agree.. the best thing one can buy is a primer tube filler... I have primer slides .001 and .002 oversized if needed for out of spec primers...I've never loaded on a Dillon 1050..but I think it would all be similar...

    I have loaded on both the 550 and 650.. I rather the 650.. All Good.. Mike
     
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