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Berliners haven't forgotten

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by sgb.1100, Oct 31, 2008.

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  1. sgb.1100

    sgb.1100 TS Member

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    Crowds Bid Farewell to Airport That Saved Berlin


    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/31/world/europe/31berlin.html?_r=1&ref=world&oref=slogin

    By NICHOLAS KULISH
    Published: October 30, 2008
    New York Times

    BERLIN — Berliners turned out on Thursday to say their goodbyes to historic Tempelhof Airport, to share a few memories and to protest its closing one last time.

    ...

    Tempelhof, although built by the Nazis, is best known as the site of the Berlin airlift of 1948 and 1949, after the Soviets blocked land access to the city. The United States and Britain brought in supplies by air, over 2 million tons of food, fuel and even machinery. It became a symbol of the Allies’ commitment to protecting the city and indeed Western Europe.

    Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke out in favor of preserving the airport earlier this year, and more than 60 percent of the voters in an April referendum said they wanted it kept open. But their numbers fell short of the minimum needed to make the referendum valid. No decision has been made as to what will be done with the airport and its grounds, though the building is a protected landmark and cannot be torn down.

    ...

    “I wanted to see the last plane take off, but they won’t let me in,” said Gunther Münke, 68, who said that as a young boy he would stand with his brother on a nearby hillside, made famous from photographs of the airlift, where children gathered to catch the sweets dropped by friendly pilots. Mr. Münke said he later worked on the building’s heating system and felt a bond with the landmark. “It is something old, and you cannot just get rid of the old.”

    On a chilly, rainy day, a crowd dominated by older locals like Mr. Münke, but also dotted with curious foreign tourists and with families with young children, milled in the entryway and outside the building. Visitors were barred from entering the cavernous main hall without a ticket for a flight, as workers prepared for the closing celebration.

    “The people stand out here in the rain while the celebrities party inside,” said Peter Lubitz, 73, who said he was vehemently opposed to the airport’s closing.

    Marina Piccolo, 48, said she had worked at her little airport cafe, Bottega Piccolo, for 14 years. Asked what she felt as the airport was shut down one last time for the party, she replied, “Sorrow and anger.”

    ...

    “In the last few days so many people, old people, have been here, crying,” said Ms. Piccolo, who herself looked as if she was on the verge of tears.
     
  2. JCS

    JCS TS Member

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    They need room to put up another Mosque ?
     
  3. sgb.1100

    sgb.1100 TS Member

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    While Berliners remember, the Japanese or should one say at least one Japanese forgets:

    Japan Fires General Who Said a U.S. ‘Trap’ Led to the Pearl Harbor Attack

    By NORIMITSU ONISHI
    Published: October 31, 2008
    New York Times
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/01/world/asia/01tokyo.html?em


    TOKYO — A high-ranking Japanese military official was dismissed Friday for writing an essay stating that the United States had ensnared Japan into World War II, denying that Japan had waged wars of aggression in Asia and justifying Japanese colonialism.

    ....

    In the essay, General Tamogami, 60, elaborated a rightist view of Japan’s wartime history shared by many nationalist politicians. But it was a rare formulation from inside Japan’s military, which, as Japan has been shedding its postwar pacifism in recent years, has gained a more prominent role.


    ....

    “Roosevelt had become president on his public pledge not to go to war, so in order to start a war between the United States and Japan, it had to appear that Japan took the first shot,” he wrote.

    He denied that Japan had invaded China and the Korean Peninsula, arguing that Japanese forces became embroiled in domestic conflicts on the Asian continent.

    “Even now, there are many people who think that our country’s aggression caused unbearable suffering to the countries of Asia during the Greater East Asia War,” he wrote, using the term favored by Japan’s right to refer to World War II. “But we need to realize that many Asian countries take a positive view of the Greater East Asia War. It is certainly a false accusation to say that our country was an aggressor nation.”

    ...

    Few politicians have spoken as comprehensively as General Tamogami did. Instead they have telegraphed their sympathies with the rightist view of history. The current prime minister, Taro Aso, in the past publicly praised Japanese colonial rule on the Korean Peninsula. Mr. Aso, whose family’s mining business used forced laborers during World War II, also said Koreans gladly adopted Japanese names.
     
  4. slide action

    slide action Well-Known Member

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    The Japanese have NEVER accepted responsibility for starting WWII. Thinking the U.S. would be preoccupied in Europe, they brutally attacked the U.S. fleet thinking they would then have free rane over the Pacafic. To this day their history books and writings exclude the stories about the rape, murder ,and torture of untold millions at the hands of Japanese Soldies and Commanders. Japanses text books say things in WWII Japan(occupied) this or that country. They never say INVADED. The Japanses were the absolute WORST in treatment of prisoners(especially those from U.S. forces! I have no particular hatred for the Japanse people in general, but have no use for the OFFICAL government denial of the counties murderous history in WWII! For the record liberals, save your crap about how many sins America is guilty with the Indians and slavery. While acknowledged by the U.S., they pail in number to other countries(especially Japan) and this nation has done what it could to make amens. The DIFFERENCE is the U.S. has done more than any nation that I know for humanatarian aid and "IS NOT" in denial about any of it's trasnsgressions of the past. The country of Japan on the other hand is drowning in it!
     
  5. Don Steele

    Don Steele Well-Known Member

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    Florida's beautiful E. Coast
    There's something to what the General says folks. NOT ALL...but there is a thread in there that is worth considering. Consider for a moment...how would you expect the USA to respond if a group of foreign nations...let's say..OPEC for exapmle....decided that they did not approve of our actions in the world and based on their opinion...they cut off ALL oil shipments. TOTAL embargo. You think there wouldn't be a HUGE outcry for immediate military action to break the embargo and insure oil flows again...??!!
    Japan was in just that situation. President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill did NOT approve of Japanese policy and decided to bring them to heel with the embargo. BTW: this was the same Winston Churchill who, as Sea Lord during the first world war was having arms and ammunition shipped to Britain on civilian ocean liners in an attempt to dodge the German U-Boats. The German government had been maintaining a hands-off policy on ocean liners until they discovered the Brit's subterfuge and felt forced to declare "unrestricted submarine warfare" to cut-off strategic shipments to Britain. It was the sinking of the ocean liner Lusitania that was the "last straw" ( read: excuse) to get the American's into WW I.
     
  6. sgb.1100

    sgb.1100 TS Member

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    Don,
    that was a thoughtful and unexpected reply. I've always been interested in WWII but for stuff about campaigns, stories, technology etc during the war. Not about how it started. I just may read more about what happened pre- Pearl Harbor. Thank you.
     
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