1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Beretta 682 spring replacement question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by grntitan, Oct 13, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    17,230
    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    I was wondering how hard it is to replace the springs on my Beretta 682? I'm very mechanically inclined but have never done springs on any gun besides a Colt 1911 recoil spring. How often should this be done? What springs should be replaced more often than others? Any advice and pointers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks---Matt
     
  2. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    17,230
    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    anyone???
     
  3. waverider

    waverider Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,631
    Location:
    HI
    I think that the inertia lever spring should be change annually if you shoot over 200 rounds a week. Unless you really shooting a lot and find that you cannot go a year with out it breaking.

    Jason
     
  4. JJM

    JJM Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    377
    Location:
    Omaha, NE / Mesa, AZ
    With the stock off you will see the hammer springs in plain sight, with both barrels fired you can remove the the spring assemblies.
    If you purchase complete assemblies then one at time insert into gun, now make sure the the firing pins are not protuding out. Remove the assembly, and adjust for proper length, with vise grips and care you can shorten or lengthen the spring assembly to the proper length. Then in a vise crimp the nut to hold in place.
    After you have done one side repeat the same for the other side.
    With this in mind now you know why the gun smiths charge a fair price to replace the springs.
    Good luck
    JM
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    17,230
    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    JM---Thanks for the quick lesson. I more than likely will let the pro's do it. I was just wondering what is involved and if a layman can do it. Thanks again.---Matt
     
  6. skeezix

    skeezix Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Messages:
    578
    I've replaced some, and would have no issue with some of the others. The cocking lever springs are easy, The hammer springs don't look terribly difficult.

    I've taken out and put the paul block spring back in - That's not difficult.

    I have not attempted the inertia lever spring, trigger spring, or the top lever spring. I have a 687 that needs an inertia lever spring replacement - but I have been a bit reluctant to tear the trigger group down that far. I'll do it one of these days.

    I've heard that replacing the top lever spring is not fun.

    I do wish there was a tech guide on how to do this.

    john
     
  7. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    17,230
    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    john--I'm the type that can take about anything apart and put it back together as long as i'm the one to take it apart. I've just not messed with my guns in that manner yet. I'm like you in one of these days i'll just dive in.---Matt
     
  8. Guard Rail

    Guard Rail TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Messages:
    209
    You can do it. They are a little complicated though. By the time you get done you will know all about them.
     
  9. Ray Collins

    Ray Collins Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Messages:
    949
    Location:
    Spanish Fort, Alabama
    Is there a source of information for the 600 series--a manual or a web site--that I can study? I built an airplane from scratch so I am mechanically capable but trial and error is expensive and frustrating. ???


    Ray
     
  10. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,866
    you do NOT have to tear down the trigger assy to replace the Inertia Lever spring.....send me a PM if you are interested in how, I have done several and can do it now in a half hour....I have discussed it here before, I call it the toothpick and Dental floss method....Frank C
     
  11. skeezix

    skeezix Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Messages:
    578
    I'd be interested in your spring replacement method. Are you replacing part no. 88 (Beretta part no. C53760) or part no. 94 (Beretta part no. C54221, C54222, C54223)?

    ref diagram: http://www.berettaservices.com/Moduli/ContentManager/publicfiles/PDF%20Esplosi%20Arma%20Parti%20Speciali/e682g_ge.pdf

    John
     
  12. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    17,230
    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    John---Great parts breakdown. I saved that and i believe i'm gonna print and laminate a copy as well. Thanks a bunch---Matt
     
  13. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,866
    Skeezix/John, per our PM discussions and for all whom might be interested, the spring I refer to is #88 on the schematics noted above.Frank C
     
  14. skeezix

    skeezix Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Messages:
    578
    Thanks Frank! 88 I can do. It's 94 that has me stumped. Well, not really stumped - just cautious. I think for that one you pretty much have to take the whole trigger assy apart. I'll just have to get the camera out and take step by step photos I guess. The exploded view is nice - but a touch lacking in sequence and relationships!

    John
     
  15. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    6,266
    I learned how to keep my 682s running by doing the work myself out of necessity. I live in Hicksville USA so getting the gun to a decent smith would require me packing it up and shipping it off. Not something I'm really comfortable with.

    The first teardown was intimidating and I was very worried that I would seriously F Up my nice shotgun. Turned out to be easier than I thought and now I can do my annual teardown and PM in about 90 minutes.

    What you should have before you start a full tear down;

    1. Good table with a soft jaw vise you can clamp the reciver in
    2. Powerful light and magnified "readers" if you are far sighted like most of us.
    3. The 680 series schematic (Cole's has a good one)
    4. Good screw driver set
    5. A few small brass punches and a nylon hammer
    6. A digital camera to take a few photos of how the receiver looked when it was assembled.

    As another poster indicated, it is not necessary to do the full tear down to replace the ineria reset spring (I like the lost tooth pick method myself) or the hammer springs but once you have gone through this process you will have a very good understanding of how those parts are supposed to function. You will also have the opportunity to inspect/replace the firing pins and springs and you will understand how to replace the locking bolt when your gun wears to that point.

    Just go slow and show no fear.
     
  16. skeezix

    skeezix Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2006
    Messages:
    578
    I need to revisit the Beretta spring question.

    The diagram shows part no 88 as the inertia block lever spring and part no. 94 as the inertia block spring.

    The parts diagram shows spring no. 88 as part no. C53760. It is called the inertia block lever spring for 12, 20 gauge. Then the parts list shows part no. C54223 as a 4 gauge spring.

    The beretta parts lists lists C54221 and C54222 as inertia block springs (C54221 for 12, 20; C54222 for 4 gauges)

    Flip over to Brownells (the US distributor for Beretta parts) and their parts list is different. Brownells shows the C53760 as the only part no. 88. For part 94 Brownells lists part no. C54221, C54222 and C54223 as inertia block springs C54221 = 12, 20 gauge. C54222 for the 28 gauge. It lists the C54223 as .410 (but name it the inertia block lever spring - which is part 88). So I am little confused. The springs physically look a bit different- but they don't picture each part no.

    For shooting .410 tubes - which springs do I want for the annual tear down? Do I need 2 of the C54223 springs - one for the inertia block lever (part 88 on the diagram) and one for the inertia block (part no. 94 on the diagram?)OR do I want a new C53760 for part 88 and C54223 for part 94? OR a C54223 for part 88 and C54222 for part 94. I'd order all of the darn things but C53760 and C54223 seem to be out of stock everywhere. Coles does not list any subgauge springs at all.

    This is for a selective single trigger 682.

    john
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

beretta 682 inertia spring

,
beretta 682 top lever spring
,

beretta 686 inertia spring diagram

,
beretta 686 springs and firing pins
,
beretta 687 trigger springs
,

beretta inertia block spring

,
beretta shotgun top lever spring might be worn
,
size 682 springs