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Beretta 680 Series Inertia Spring

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Calkidd, Mar 4, 2014.

  1. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    I have done a little research and found some information regarding the problems with the 680 series not setting the second trigger on doubles.

    I experienced this, this past weekend and after my 2 FF freebies I had an additional 5 FF because my triggers would not reset. Of course shooting a PFS doesn't help any.

    From what I have read there are several ways to combat this.
    <ol>
    <li>Convert to mechanical triggers</li>
    <li>Lighter inertial spring (.410 ga)</li>
    <li>Add lead tape on the inertial block</li>
    <li>lock out the PFS</li>
    </ol>
    Of course I am more interested in keeping my PFS function as it is suppose to. Why lock it out? Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of having one?

    Not too interested in mechanical trigger given the cost to have it done, unless there are instructions how to do this, then I can do it myself.

    However, I have heard replacing the spring with one from a .410. Or simply stick on some lead tape.

    I have heard to help with the replacement of the inertia spring there is this "Toothpick/Dental Floss" trick. I don't know how it is done this way unless someone can explain or if there are pictures showing this method.

    What has been other 680 owners experienced and what has worked for them?

    Bryan
  2. Scoutman 06

    Scoutman 06 TS Member

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    The toothpick & dental floss trick is used to replace the #098 spring on the intetia block lever. If your gun fails to set the 2nd barrel only intermittently, that spring is not the problem. When it breaks, you have to manually switch barrels every time. Assuming the gun is clean & oiled internally, adding some lead tape as an experiment could narrow things down. I had a PFS on a 682E turned 6 turns out from dead stop & it functioned fine with 1 oz. loads. Cole's or Phillips Gunsmithing can set it up for shooting sub-gauge ammo but it is not a true mechanical trigger. John
  3. neo

    neo Member

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    Briley fixed my 682 for about $100.00 plus shipping just have to send the receiver fast turnaround very good work.....neo
  4. Aircooled6racer

    Aircooled6racer Member

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    Hello: Take a look at the Power Factor show about the Beretta 680 series guns. They give the part numbers for the springs needed to make the gun cycle lighter loads. Steve and John do a great job explaning how these guns work. They are shows 165 and 166. Thanks, Eric
  5. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies.

    John, I had no idea there was an adjustment for the inertia block. Then again I haven't given it a good look. Thanks for the information.

    Bryan

    **update**

    It was brought to my attention that I believe John was talking about the adjustment on the PFS....
  6. Scoutman 06

    Scoutman 06 TS Member

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    Bryan, Yes I was referring to the adjustment on the PFS stock itself. I think the only way to make changes on the inertia block is to get a different wt. block or install an intertia block spring with a different tension. John
  7. StevenZ

    StevenZ TS Member

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    Beretta 68x trigger disassembly video
  8. StevenZ

    StevenZ TS Member

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    Beretta 68x trigger assembly video
  9. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    Excellent Steven thank you very much.

    Bryan
  10. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    Intermittent FTF on the second bbl can be because of a fouled cocking rod lever also. Cock the gun and take off the bbls. Push on the cocking rods in the bottom of the receiver - if either of them is loose and not spring loaded you have a stuck cocking rod return spring/plunger. Sometime a good cleaning will do it. Otherwise you have to drop the trigger group and sort out the cocking levers.

    I believe the Briley modification is primarily re-profiling the sear on the inertia arm that the pawl block rests against so it takes less movement of the inertia arm to release the pawl block.
  11. RGS Guy

    RGS Guy TS Member

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    I have seen this problem on the Beretta 682 series when shooters are using a light load for the first shot of doubles. "Sometimes" it will not set the second trigger because of lack of enough recoil to move the inertia block far enough to set it. I have lightened the existing spring with a slight bend to reduce the spring tension. Worked every time. It is kind of a pain, as you need a slave pin to hold parts together to re-install.
  12. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    I am going to embed these. Hopefully this thread will be a big help for someone else with this issue.

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/j80PBu1X__M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/bFJk4ykc-ko" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  13. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    Just as I was afraid this would be the case, the two screws that hold the trigger receiver in are loc-tite.

    The gunsmith in the video mentioned he heated up the material to 300°. Do you think it would be best to use a torch or heat the entire unit in an oven?

    <i>**Please do not reply with "if you are asking this question you should not be doing this, or have a qualified gunsmith do it".***</i>

    Bryan

    ***update, I caught it that he said he used a heat gun....***
  14. nudge

    nudge Member

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    You can use a 110 volt heat gun to warm up the screws. It is a good idea to invest in a set of Brownell's European screw drivers bits to work on the Beretta's.
    Brian
  15. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    Thanks nudge. After reviewing the video again i realized i did not have the right screw drivers.
  16. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    You can also use an electric soldering iron to heat the screw to soften the loktite. just touch the head of the screw with the soldering iron.

    You do want the thin bit set from Brownells. There are only about 2 or 3 of the bits you really need. For the top lever screw and the screw under the safety you need a heavier bladed screwdriver though. The thin bit set has 0.020 and 0.024 (IIRC) bits. You need the smallest 0.020 bit to get the lock screw out and another wider bit (Maybe 3/8" wide IIRC) to get out the main trigger plate screw. I filed down a regular hollow ground bit until it fits the screw under the safety lever and keep it with my thin bit set.
  17. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    I figured the thin bit set would come in handy on some things I work on. It's not all that bad for $40 for a set of specialized bits.

    I have been conversing with John (gunsmith on Power Factor Show)and he has done quite a bit trying to get out that larger screw. I was able to get the lop lever screw out with a propane torch, but the trick lies with discoloring the metal on the bottom larger screw. He ended up using a heat gun for about 10 minutes.

    I asked him if a good old fashion impact driver would do the trick. He said he did, and broke the bit. He used the quill on his mill to hold the receiver and used the down force of the chuck to keep pressure on the bit. It too broke in two pieces.

    All in all heat HAS to be applied and the chances of buggering up the screw head is great. For $10 another one can be bought.

    I'll keep you all posted.

    Bryan
  18. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    Interesting you're having that much trouble with the trigger plate screw. I've yet to run into one that doesn't turn right out when the lock screw is removed. I wonder if you should take a small brass disk placed on the head of the screw and give it couple of taps with a dead blow and possible squirt some kroil into the hole where the lockscrew came out.
  19. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    **UPDATE**

    <a href="http://s1206.photobucket.com/user/Calkidd/media/682/20140318_162001_zpsrhvcmw6c.jpg.html" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    I ordered a set of the thin bits and they came in today. Just prior to ordering the bit set I was able to get the screw out from underneath the safety/barrel selector. It took the heat from a propane torch to break the screw loose, but it was evident loc-tite was used.

    The screw under the receiver was a little more technical. I removed the brass set screw, sprayed a little PB Blaster inside the hole and used a 140 watt soldering gun to heat the head of the screw. I was a little surprised the screw head didn't heat up at much as I thought. I don't think it got up over 100°, but maybe it was just enough heat to get the PB Blaster into the threads. However, I have heard PD Blaster is pretty amazing stuff when it comes to releasing stuck screws/bolts. With hardly any force at all the screw popped loose.

    I guess I was a lucky with this one because in the video he had to heat one receiver up to over 300° to break loose the screw.

    By looking at the screw it doesn't appear there was any thread lock used.

    <a href="http://s1206.photobucket.com/user/Calkidd/media/682/fc594efb-5e82-4467-b894-b1cde9eb3462_zpsab7c2982.jpg.html" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    My next step is to take the trigger a part with the assistance of the video provided by Power Factor Show.

    Bryan
  20. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    I got it all done. I had to order the springs from Cole's since Brownells was back ordered until July.

    I didn't take a photo of the two springs to compare them for you, but there is about a .020-.050" difference in diameter between the inertia block spring and inertia lever spring.

    I truly believe this is what is performed on a Beretta 680 series shotgun when you send it in. I also believe the term "mechanical trigger" conversion is a misnomer because I honestly don't see how this could be done to the trigger group with out some major modification. Plus it would cost a lot more than $125 they charge you to convert your triggers.

    But just like in the video the falling of the hammers is enough to reset the second trigger. I also went in with a small stone and a file to knock down the burrs and sharp edges to clean things up a little.

    After it is all said and done this was an extremely easy job and just about anyone with a little bit of mechanical ability can do this.

    Bryan