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belt sander for recoil pads?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by skeet_man, Nov 20, 2010.

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  1. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    I'm currently using a 10" disk sander with a B & R pad jig, and while I love the jig, I'm not quite satisfied with the sander. You have to be very careful where you put the pad, and in what orientation, otherwise the sander wants to grab or buck the pad. Not to mention the fact that putting a new piece of paper on is a pain in the butt...

    Would a 4" belt sander along these lines be quicker and a little more user friendly?


    skeetman_2008_030323.jpg
     
  2. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    I made a cradle to secure my Craftsman hand held belt sander to use it for that purpose. It works fine.
     
  3. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Ian. I use my Dewalt belt sander in a fashion like the picture you show. I hand hold the pad and rest it against the bottom frame of the sander just below the belt. I put the sander handle into my bench vise. I grind the sides and heel like that.

    Then I take my old pad and tape it to the new pad to establish the same toe angle. Does all this work good and fast? No, but they come out ok, but not nearly what Doug Braker does.

    But same concept as the belt sander yo show above.
     
  4. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    A belt sander does a better job. The longer belt runs cooler. It is easy to change belts.

    I have a Craftsman 4" belt sander with a stand. The stand has a small table - about 4" deep and 10" wide. I made some vertical pieces that go on the sides of the belt (parallel to the belt). These sides give me something to rest the stock against as I sand the pad attached to the stock. I pur two layers of masking tape on the stock. When I cut the first layer it is time to stop and replace the tape.

    I made a jig to hold the pad and grind it to a scribed line but I like grinding them on the stock better. I can match the angle of the stock all the way around that way and end up with a smoother contour.

    Jim Sleel
     
  5. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Abrasive blade in a table saw works good. You work on the side of the blade. You can lower the blade to the proper height and not touch the wood. a strip of masking tape around the heel of the stock tells you when to stop.

    Perfect.

    HM
     
  6. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    Halfmile. That table saw idea sounds like a winner. I will give it a try the next time. Thanks for teaching us to think outside the box.
     
  7. acss

    acss Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    halfmile- how do you keep the stock square with the blade, when you have a curved pad?--also, how do you get the toe to slope out with the stocks pointed toe?
     
  8. rennerize

    rennerize Active Member

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    I use a 6 inch belt sander with the hanging jig from Brownells. I tried the dics sander but did not like it because it wears the disc out really quick. The belt sander last for many pads. But I put on maybe 100 per year.
    Don
     
  9. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Don, above does it the way I've always seen it done. Have had done to mine, and its perfect every time with every angle on both sides, top and bottom angles perfect every time. Its a no-brainer! Break-em all. Jeff
     
  10. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Good information.

    Ed Ward
     
  11. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    How is the way an abrasive table saw blade works different from a 10" disc sander?

    Having 10" discs of aluminum oxide paper pre-cut and sticking them to a disc with rubber cement makes abrasive disc changes a 5 minute job plus you have a choice of grits

    MK
     
  12. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I thought of the table saw because:

    A. I have one, with the abrasive blade. the only other tool I had was a grinder, and that seemed sort of dangerous. Necessity is the nmother of invention, after all. The good thing is the one Jim Flynn uses, permanently attached to the grinder with a hook for the jig.

    B. You can set the height of the blade to avoid harming the wood.

    If you want to be real pro, use a jig for the toe. I just did it free hand (carefully) and it worked out fine.

    Hint: freeze the Kick-Eze, cuts much better and doesn't load up.

    HM
     
  13. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    The proper wayto fit the recoil pad is to install it on the gun and scribe the new recoil pad, and install it on a B&R Jig or similar device available from Brownells, most gunsmiths use the jig similiar to the B&R Jig, there are different Mfgrs of this style o0f jig. And you need a good belt sander similiar to the one pictured, and the jig properly mounted for the job being done. It is a trial and error on your first recoil pad, I suggest you use a old used recoil pad for the first time before going with the new pad.


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  14. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote><I>"...the only other tool I had was a grinder, and that seemed sort of dangerous."</I></blockquote>There are a couple gun store gunsmiths I've dealt with who actually use do grinder motors but they have flexible Cratex wheels mounted on them. The wheel look to be 1½ - 2" across and 8 inches in diameter. They have a molded urethane core and an abrasive outer surface that may/may not be a belt. They say they put a couple wraps of masking tape on the wood and grind away. The wheels don't pull or burn the pad and won't cut the masking tape. They do everything freehand.

    MK
     
  15. acss

    acss Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    i actually found something(s)-that i dont have & will ask santa to bring me!!!!
     
  16. Sky Buster

    Sky Buster Sky Buster TS Supporters

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    Put your pad in the freezer overnight. You'll have no
    tears or pulling. Grinds much easier when frozen.
     
  17. andybull

    andybull Active Member

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    I have a heavy duty 6" bench belt sander with a jig. The 4' Sears type is flimsy and you cant apply the pressure I like to use when grinding pads.


    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]


    Andy
     
  18. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    I have had a combo 6" belt sander/12"disc sander in my machine shop for 30 years. I bought it in 1975 when I started making Custom Knives, it was my horizontal milling machine and used for tapering tangs, and milling flat surfaces.

    I originally used the disc for these operations, however after changing the sanding disc about 100 times I finally got sick of it and now for the last 29 years I have only used the 6" belt sander as the discs are just too much of a PITA to change.

    I bought a pad sanding jig from Midway, after years of sweating blood when grinding a recoil pad on the stock using masking tape to protect the stock. They are really easy to use and if you have a decent vertical belt sander it is about a 30-45 minute jod to do a first rate recoil pad job.

    It always saddens me to see a recoil pad with the toe ground off of it because the person who did it either didn't know how to do the job right, or didn't have the tools to do the job right. Either way a little research and patience goes along way to ending up with the correct result.

    Or you could always pay a gunsnmith who knows how to do it. Paying a little more for a correctly done job is really alot better than showing up with ugly crap!

    Just my .02.

    Randy
     
  19. 25deadbirds

    25deadbirds TS Member

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    Notice, in the picture of andybull's post how the pad is hanging soft rubber side down....no matter what abrasive method you use, grind the pad with the soft side down so the sanding disc, belt, etc.. pulls the rubber away from the the hard base. Do it the other way and the belt wants to pinch and tear the rubber down into the hard base. FYI!!
     
  20. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    I've seen a few pictures of those hangy-dangly pad jigs and can't for the life of me figure out how you would grind a pad with one of those.

    I rough out my pads on a 10" home-built disc sander. I bolt them to a 1/8" thick aluminum template of the required shape and sand until they're within 1/32" of the template. Then I finish them on a 2" x 4" sanding drum mounted in a drill press. Pad sits flat on the drill press table, changeable abrasive runs the length of the pad and doesn't tear anything.<center>
    [​IMG]
    </center>

    MK
     
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