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BDC OR DOA RETICLE ON SCOPE

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by kevin a., Feb 7, 2013.

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  1. kevin a.

    kevin a. Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2011
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    has anyone tried the bdc or doa reticles on scopes ?
    wanting a new scope for coyotes on my .223 rifle

    how do you like them or dont like them ?

    thanks kevin
     
  2. YOTESLAYER

    YOTESLAYER Member

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    I have them on every rifle i own, all Nikon. I have a 150 BDC reticle on my 10/22, I have a 6-24X50BDC on my .243, I have a prostaff 3-9X40BDC on my muzzleloader. I had a M-223 Nikon on my AR, sold the whole setup about 6 months ago(kicking my own butt). I would look at the M-223 series of scopes for any .223. They are a great scope. A mildot scope has its place for competition and range judging applications but if you are shooting paper and have a known range a BDC scope is leaps and bounds better for me. Nikon has a program on there website that allows you to put in your caliber, bullet, muzzle velocity, and as much more info as you know. It then gives you what each BDC circle is good for. If you put the info in correctly the program works flawlessly!!!
     
  3. cnsane

    cnsane Member

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    Pretty much everybody is offering a scope with reticles looking like a tree, or a tornado, or a ladder, or a screen door. And pretty much nobody has standardized them. That's why all my scopes are MilDot-- it's always the same substensions, scope after scope. 3.6" @ 100 yards at the correct magnification. And no matter the distance to the target, if the bullet hole is a dot off, it is 14 clicks(+ a tenth of an inch at 100) to the next dot. And you still have to actually shoot a drop table if you are serious about long range.
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Unless these BDC reticles are in the first focal plane, then they will only be accurate at a certain magnification, and so far all manufacturers have set them at max. This means, for example, the BDC reticle on the Nikon 4.5-14x Coyote Special scope only works at 14x, which is way too much magnification for coyotes. (And mil-dot reticles have the same problem if they are not in the first focal plane.)

    Options that do work are:

    A scope with the BDC reticle in the first focal plane, but these scopes are costly-'spensive.

    A scope with a BDC elevation knob. Ideally you don't use the BDC feature after you've started calling but BEFORE. For example... I have a Leupold Mark AR 3-9x on my Rem R-15. It's calibrated for 55gr 223/5.56. I leave it set on 100 yards for most coyote hunting, and at 3x for when shots are going to be up close, like in heavy brush or in the woods. If I'm setting up overlooking long distances I'll turn it up to 5x or 6x, and turn the BDC knobs to 200 or 300 yards, etc. I don't use 9x for coyotes. It's for sighting in or practice on varmints.

    I also prefer an uncluttered reticle. A simple duplex is pretty fast.



    [​IMG]
     
  5. Ruck

    Ruck Well-Known Member

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    Brian, using the Spot On app for the Nikon scopes gives you the range for the rings at any magnification for any load.

    Ken Rucker
     
  6. Rubicon_Joey

    Rubicon_Joey Active Member

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    I considered getting a Nikon BDC for my marlin model 60 (.22lr) for a long time and ended up deciding against it because of the magnification and varying load problems. What I did get though is a Nikon with resettable turrets, meaning that once you adjust your scope to shoot where the cross hairs point, you can pull up on the turret and turn it (without moving the cross hairs) to zero. I keep my .22 "zeroed" at 50yrds. When I I want to shoot another distance/different load (load doesn't normally make much diff with the .22) I just adjust my turrets so I shoot where I'm aiming and then when I'm done I move them back to zero and I know next time I'm dead on at 50 without doing anything.

    If you wanted to you could even make yourself a chart of loads at yardages vs turret setting with your most frequent load and yardage being the zero spot to minimize adjustments when changing distance or load. You can just look up the load and distance to you plan use and the corresponding turret setting.
    IE something like this...

    <a href="http://s30.beta.photobucket.com/user/rubicon_joey/media/Table_zps50d9f547.png.html" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>
     
  7. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Ken, you should not have to consult a chart before firing the gun.

    Coyote hunting often demands getting a shot off very quickly and accurately. All the gimmicks in the world will not make up for time lost in getting that shot off. The problem is coyotes often do not loiter around, waiting for you to consult charts, calculate drops, twist knobs, etc. You see the coyote and you aim and fire the moment he stops, assuming he even stops. Speed and accuracy is what kills coyotes. This is why I prefer an uncluttered reticle and the only compromise I make is with a BDC elevation knob. And you know how many times I've actually used it for coyote hunting? I think three, and always done prior to calling when I get into position. (Edit, three times with my R15. I forgot I used to routinely set my older target scopes to 200 yards zeros while in the field.)

    If you are constantly having to shoot coyotes at 300 to 500 yards, the problem is more basic than needing shooting aids. You need to reevaluate how you are calling in coyotes and figure out why they won't come closer. I often use a shotgun, or carry one with me.

    Technique, not technology, is what kills coyotes.

    One of the best coyote killers I know used a Browning BLR in .243 with a 4x scope. Know your gun and scope. Back in the day I hunted coyotes with Browning 1885 Single Shots in 223, 22-250 and 25-06. The 25-06, while highly destructive of pelts, shot flat enough that I did not have to hold off of fur out to 300 yards.

    Know your cartridge. Know the bullet flight path. And take your coyote gun varmint hunting. If you can hit a ground squirrel or prairie dog, you can certainly hit a coyote. I take my coyote guns varmint hunting for practice.
     
  8. YOTESLAYER

    YOTESLAYER Member

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    The spot on on Nikons website is very interesting to play around with, try it if you havnt. You dont have to have a Nikon scope to learn something from it. It calculates bullet drop and windage per your load. For punching paper there is nothing better then the Nikon Spot-on app for your smart phone. You can set it to every detail right down to the barometric pressure, temperature, angle uphill or downhill, muzzle velocity, bullet weight and much more. I have found all of the data to be incredibly accurate as well. As for coyote hunting it depends what kind of hunting you are doing. For us we spot and stalk and distance is only another challenge. A friend of mine killed a coyote at almost 500 yards yesterday with his .243 with a Nikon BDC scope. If you are calling them, I would suggest a simple scope and Know your rifle.
     
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doa reticle vs bdc

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is an doa reticle the same as an bdc reticle