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Barrel hone

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by twotimer, Jul 21, 2010.

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  1. twotimer

    twotimer Member

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    Jan 18, 2010
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    Has anyon used a barrel hone to remove minor pitting? I fso, what were the results or what would someone recommend? Thanks, Mike
     
  2. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    About the only sure way to remove light pitting is with the use of a honing machine...ie Sunnen Hone. Using the correct grit stone and the right amount of pressure, the hone will keep the bore straight and even. The stones used on this type of machine are about 4" long.

    The use of a brake hone is fine for removing light machine marks in a chamber or forcing cone, but it cannot apply enough pressure or cover a long enough area to do the bore. Also besides using plenty of oil during the honing process, you may accomplish some progress after 2-3 hours of non-stop honing.

    The honing "brushes" sold by Brownells will not remove the pitting. These flex-hone will ride up and down all of the imperfections. They work fine for brightening up a bore, but no for removing pits.

    Doug Braker
     
  3. twotimer

    twotimer Member

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    Thanks Doug, I just picked up a really clean 1897 with this problem. Sounds like I am either going to live with the problem or find someone who knows what they are doing to deal with it. Mike
     
  4. kirbythegunsmith

    kirbythegunsmith Member

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    Jan 3, 2008
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    Doug is right about those details.

    Honing more than a few thousandths risks having the blend area into the choke become buggered or lopsided.

    Precision reboring (backboring) is what I do for barrels with significant pitting to keep the interior finished section in alignment with the original surface.

    Think about it- if you had one side of the bore more heavily pitted than the other side for a considerable distance, stones will not cut on the most intact areas as much as they will try to cut into the eroded areas, so expect bore "walk" in those cases. Precision boring will be more able to remain in line when working through varying density areas i.e. pits heavy on one side, none on the other. Realize that the solid cutting tool can use the following (trailing) section to keep the front section aligned when transiting the variable areas of the pitted bore.

    Precision honing after reboring is able to have consistent cutting action around the circumference of smooth metal having only minor tool marks remaining. Time is better spent and alignment is improved by cutting and THEN honing.

    Kirby
     
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