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Barrel Cleaning - Competition

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by TipTop, Jan 2, 2011.

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  1. TipTop

    TipTop Member

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    I have a new K80 with competition choke work done by a very well known barrel smith. I put roughly 750 rounds per week through my barrels.

    What is the best way to clean and take care of these barrels?
    What products should be used?
    And how often should they be cleaned?
     
  2. Spanky

    Spanky Active Member

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    Not trying to be a smart A$$, why would these barrel/tubes in a k80 be any different than your previously barrels/tubes in regards to cleaning. Seriously, trying to see what the difference could be.
     
  3. Quack_kills

    Quack_kills TS Member

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    Competition? 750 rounds a week and you need to ask how to clean your barrels? Like the guy above, not trying to be sarcastic, but it is not rocket science. I find that a soft bronze brush on a rod, chucked into a drill with your favorite solvent works great. The type of barrels, chokes and smith who did the work, make no difference in how to clean them...
     
  4. TipTop

    TipTop Member

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    The difference being, I've just made a serious investment into these
    barrels and I'd like to insure their performance for many years to come.
    Does that sound stupid?
     
  5. TipTop

    TipTop Member

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    I give up!

    Thanks for all the good advice fellas! (sarcastic!)
     
  6. Chipmaker

    Chipmaker Active Member

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    It would seem rather obvious to me that you should ask the "very well known barrel smith" that you spent your money with this question as to not ruin his expert work on your barrels................. Why even ask the question to someone you don't even know on a forum on the good ol world wide web?

    Hows that for advice !
     
  7. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Tip Top, There is no special treatment required unless you have choke tubes. A drill/brush can spin those babies out and your new tube could bounce off the floor....damaged. If you have choke tubes, take them out every night (after shooting)and re-oil them just to be safe.

    Other than that a good brass bore brush and solvent. If you use a drill motor, make sure the brush or barrel is soaked in solvent and you don't let it set in one spot too long.

    Good luck.
     
  8. TipTop

    TipTop Member

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    Thank You SETTERMAN!

    The reason I asked this question is that there are alot of smart people out there, and I'm interested in hearing their way of doing things. You can
    learn something from anyone if you listen.

    So please, only post if your interested in CONTRIBUTING to the conversation and have something to add that we can all use.

    Thank You!
     
  9. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    Clenzoil, use it on the entire gun (metal and wood) and don't worry about it anymore ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  10. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    One well-known HOF shooter from California told me: He almost NEVER cleans his barrels. I imagine he ticos them with a little bit of oil to prevent rusting. Theory: The barrels will never get dirtier than what one shot would do. And those are Wilkinson "tuned" barrels on his MX-3. However, he shoots a lot and keeps after the performance of the gun to see if anything goes "off song"...I imagine he shoots as much in a typical month as the average trapshooter shoots in a year. I also have a hunch because he shoots so much, any moisture never accumulates for long, it is just merely dried out/blown out due to shooting. Howver, I could not bring myself to take care of a barrel the he does. But why argue with success; the barrel has been shot by him for over 20 years. And, of course, he shoots factory loads exclusively.

    Me? I take barrels off away from the wood and, when very dirty, I use acetone on a patch to loosen plastic. Keep acetone away from the wood; it will very likely eat any finish. It's used to remove nail polish, btw. After that, a little bit of scrubbing with a big patch over a 10 gauge bronze brush. Then some more non-acetone solvent, and patch a few times. Idea: Keep metal shiny looking and less likely to pit. And I take the chokes out now and then and re-oil and clean threads. I also sometimes use a special chamber brush. I'm no expert, but my barrels stay shiny looking. Tico after using; scrub with brush and patch about every 400-700 rounds or so.
     
  11. den1100

    den1100 Member

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    Vancouver BC
    G96 and a bore snake, righ tbefore you put it in your truck to go home
     
  12. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    I'm with den1100.. Wipe down all metal with a little Rem Oil or Tri Flo after you use the bore snake.. and a shot of oil down the barrel after the bore snake is good if you're not shooting for a week or two..
     
  13. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    But store it in the vault with the bore down so the oil doesn't run down the barrel and into your firing pins, triggers, and stock.

    Also use a snap cap or release the triggers prior to storage. It is hard on the springs if they are in tension while in storage.
     
  14. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    About once a month or so, I'll soak a barrel swab with carb cleaner. I run this up and down the barrel a couple of times and let it set for a few minutes. Then a 10ga bore brush is run through the barrels. The carb cleaner dislodges the platic build-up, what little I have, and lets the brush remove it very easily. I may start doing this once every 2 or 3 months since I'm not getting hardly any plastic residue in my barrel since my switch to DownRange wads.

    I reoil the barrel both inside and out after this is done. Make sure to do this without the wood attached to the barrel as the carb cleaner will harm the finish.

    ss
     
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