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Bamboo Fly Rod

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by bobcat16, Jul 28, 2011.

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  1. bobcat16

    bobcat16 Member

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    Any interest in a Summers 7.5 for 4 wt cane rod with 3 tips? EXCELLENT condition fished very little. 1500 plus ship
     
  2. ms_yuan

    ms_yuan Member

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    Which is better, 7.5' 4 wt or 8' 4 wt? :)

    Actually, I have a 7.5' Walt Powell rod which I don't use often enough. Now I'm all hot to go fish!

    Good luck with your sale.
     
  3. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Would it be too much to ask... That you take a picture of this magnifico fly rod for all us peons to see? Huh?
     
  4. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    I want to see the picture with Jack holding it over the river behind his house. :)
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I just want to see what a $1500 stick looks like. It hurt me to spend $130 for my G Loomis Ultra Light.
     
  6. ms_yuan

    ms_yuan Member

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    Summers is considered by some to be amongst the finest and most collectible of handmade, Tonkin cane bamboo flyrods ever produced. While $1,500 might seem a lot for a "stick", so would $10,000 for new K-80 Trap Special to most people. Yet, many here, who know about trap guns, would snap up a $10,000 K-80 TS. Well, if you go on to Summers' site, you'll see new and used Summers rods in the $2,000 - $10,000 dollar range, so $1,500 for a Summers stick isn't that bad.

    Again, good luck with the sale, Bobcat16.

    Here's an EXAMPLE of a RW Summers rod. Please note that this is *NOT* the rod that Bobcat16 is offering to sell. It's to show you what a $2,900 "stick" looks like.


    [​IMG]


    I apologize, Bobcat16, didn't mean to hijack your thread.
     
  7. TNCoach

    TNCoach Member

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    bobcat16,

    You have quite a rod listed at a great price and like ms_yuan stated should be in the 2k plus range. If you can post some images you should get a buyer!

    ms_yuan why the 7.5 or 8 question? 7.5 is my preference when working tight streams in the smokies.

    TNCoach
     
  8. ms_yuan

    ms_yuan Member

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    TNcoach, it was a stupid attempt at trapshooter humor -- the eternal question, which is better for singles, 7.5's or 8's?
     
  9. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    ms... Dont' fret... I got it and thought it good considering the obscure preferences of fly fishermen
    [​IMG]
     
  10. trouttrapper

    trouttrapper TS Member

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    Bob: I might be interested in your bamboo rod. I tried to email you but my system would not recognise your address. Please call me at 405-579-7011. Thank you Lou B.
     
  11. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    MIA...

    Nice vintage Orvis rod!

    Jay
     
  12. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Jay. My fave for smallies is a 7 wt Loomis. Prob 15 years old. I have a classic Scientific anglers reel on it. Casts surface bugs well. I am only a sufficient caster. I tend to let the rod get too low on the back cast. But can still get it out 75'. The Smallmouth bass is the panfish of the St Croix River. In front of my dock by the gazillions. The river is dark from tannins and no feeding goes on at nite.But at first light the smallies herd the minnow pods to the surface and commonly surface in the process. When you see a surface yo cast a red/white popper to the spot and BANG, you get a hit. Trapshooting mostly these days, but when I first got here I caught 2-300 bass a season right off my dock
     
  13. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Jay. My fave for smallies is a 7 wt Loomis. Prob 15 years old. I have a classic Scientific anglers reel on it. Casts surface bugs well. I am only a sufficient caster. I tend to let the rod get too low on the back cast. But can still get it out 75'. The Smallmouth bass is the panfish of the St Croix River. In front of my dock by the gazillions. The river is dark from tannins and no feeding goes on at nite.But at first light the smallies herd the minnow pods to the surface and commonly surface in the process. When you see a surface yo cast a red/white popper to the spot and BANG, you get a hit. Trapshooting mostly these days, but when I first got here I caught 2-300 bass a season right off my dock
     
  14. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    There is a misconception about how smallmouth are good fighters. They are extremely tough vertically, but come to you easily horizontally. The last 5 to 10 feet of retrieve is the battle. They have tremendous muscle structure.
     
  15. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    and they are wonderful eaters
     
  16. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    For fun and frolic, taken from the book "Double Whammy" by Carl Hiaasen. I like to think it puts things into perspective...

    The largemouth bass is the most popular gamefish in North America, as it can be found in the warmest waters of almost every state. Its appeal has grown so astronomically in the last ten years that thousands of bass-fishing clubs have sprung up, and are swamped with new members. According to the sporting-goods industry, more millions of dollars are spent to catch largemouth bass than are spent on any other outdoor activity in the United States. Bass magazines promote the species as the workingman's fish, available to anyone within strolling distance of a lake, river, culvert, reservoir, rockpit, or drainage ditch. The bass is not picky; it is hardy, prolific, and on a given day will eat just about any God-awful lure dragged in front of its maw. As a fighter it is bullish, but tires easily; as a jumper its skills are admirable, though no match for a graceful rainbow trout or tarpon; as table fare it is blandly acceptable, even tasty when properly seasoned. Its astonishing popularity comes from a modest combination of these traits, plus the simple fact that there are so many largemouth bass swimming around that just about any damn fool can catch one.

    Its democratic nature makes the bass an ideal tournament fish, and a marketing dream-come-true for the tackle industry. Because a large-mouth in Seattle is no different from its Everglades cousin, expensive bass-fishing products need no regionalization, no tailored advertising. This is why hard-core bass fishermen everywhere are outfitted exactly the same, from their trucks to their togs to their tackle. On any body of water, in any county rural or urban, the uniform and arsenal of the bassing fraternity are unmistakable. The universal mission is to catch one of those freakishly big bass known as lunkers or hawgs. In many parts of the country, any fish over five pounds is considered a trophy, and it is not uncommon for the ardent basser to have three or four such specimens mounted on the walls of his home; one for the living room, one for the den, and so on. The geographic range of truly gargantuan fish, ten to fifteen pounds, is limited to the humid Deep South, particularly Georgia and Florida. In these areas the quest for the world's biggest bass is rabid and ruthless; for tournament fishermen this is the big leagues, where top prize money for a two-day event might equal seventy-five thousand dollars. If the weather on these days happens to be rotten or the water too cold, a dinky four-pound bass might win the whole shooting match. More than likely, though, it takes a lunker fish to win the major tournaments, and few anglers are capable of catching lunkers day in and day out.

    Weekend anglers are fond of noting that the largest bass ever caught was not landed by a tournament fisherman. It was taken by a nineteen-year-old Georgia farm kid named George W. Perry at an oxbow slough called Montgomery Lake. Fittingly, young Perry had never heard of Lowrance fish-finders or Thruster trolling motors or Fenwick graphite flipping sticks. Perry went out fishing in a simple rowboat and took the only bass lure he owned, a beat-up Creek Chub. He went fishing mainly because his family was hungry, and he returned with a largemouth bass that weighed twenty-two pounds, four ounces. The year was 1932. Since then, despite all the space-age advancements in fish-catching technology, nobody has boated a bass that comes close to the size of George Perry's trophy, which he and his loved ones promptly ate for dinner. Today an historical plaque commemorating this leviathan largemouth stands on Highway 117, near Lumber City, Georgia. It serves as a defiant and nagging challenge to modern bass fishermen and all their infernal electronics. Some ichthyologists have been so bold as to suggest that the Monster of Montgomery Lake was a supremely mutant fish, an all- tackle record that will never be bested by any angler. To which Dickie Lockhart, in closing each segment ofFish Fever, would scrunch up his eyes, wave a finger at the camera, and decree: "George Perry, next week your cracker butt is history!"
     
  17. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    I notice Jacks hand is pure and scarless back then. If you put a decimal point in your distance MIA, then you know how good I am. :)
     
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