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Awesome .22 full auto....

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, Dec 25, 2010.

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  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    M16 with LM7 upper with Razorback bolt upgrade, shooting a 1000 round belt of cheap .22 LR.

    No, it's not mine. I wish it was.
     
  2. Don Rackley

    Don Rackley Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    wow, 2600 rounds in 56 seconds. Looks like the shooter was real comfortable, not a surprise with a .22.

    That would be a real rabbit killer
     
  3. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    I WANT ONE!!!!!!
     
  4. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    I loved this vid. 1000 rounds strait thru with not so much as a hick up. This thing ran perfectly.

    I think this could be a viable urban assault weapon. I know I would not feel bad if the only gun I could get ahold of in a street brawl was my Browning .22 auto. Having this would definately bring your confidence up to assault weapon standards.

    Randy
     
  5. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    WOW!! That sure would prevent a head poppin up to look for the source!!

    Hap
     
  6. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    It's neat, but the cyclic rate doesn't sound much more then a MG42.
     
  7. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    <iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/7h0s_62jXuk" frameborder="0"></iframe>

    ss
     
  8. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Randy, you could shoot coons in your yard, and the neighbors would just think you were running your air compressor.



    My buddy has an American 180, and it's about like that, but man...every now and then it blows a case head, and it's a royal bitch to get back in action after that.



    I like this guy's setup much better.
     
  9. JoeBobOutfitters

    JoeBobOutfitters TS Member

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    I've looked at the lakeside razorback kits...they sure are sweet!
     
  10. twotimer

    twotimer Member

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    Even though it is only a .22, seems to me that much lead throught the barrel nonstop would over heat something. Mike
     
  11. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Nice video.

    I was surprised that the weapon did not overheat.

    This should be an effective crowd control weapon. It would really be awesome with a water jacket and a laser sight to project a little red dot onto the chest area of anybody in a crowd that did not want to disburse.

    Before WW I, did not Maxim link together over 50,000 rounds and shoot them all in one burst through a water cooled Maxim machine gun? I believe that this was a sales pitch for the performance and durability of his design.

    I remember reading somewhere that four British water cooled machine guns fired over 1,000,000 rounds during one day of the Battle of the Somme river during WW I.

    In the Army during the 1960's, we used to use WW II vintage water cooled 30 caliber (30-06) machine guns for overhead fire over the infiltration course.

    Ed Ward
     
  12. jakearoo

    jakearoo Active Member

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    Wow! That is one exciting video! I could watch it over and over.
     
  13. trench12

    trench12 TS Member

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    I wouldn't want to have to clean that thing- It's obvious that he wasn't using Remington ammo. Some where I have a tape of four American 180's mounted on the wing of an ultra-light strafing a field of balloons. Looks like great big fun!!!
     
  14. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    <i>"This should be an effective crowd control weapon. It would really be awesome with a water jacket and a laser sight to project a little red dot onto the chest area of anybody in a crowd that did not want to disburse."</i>

    American Arms International made a .22 machinegun called the American 180. It superficially resembled a Thompson, but had a 165 round drum positioned horizontally on top, like an old Lewis machingun. Illinois Arms Company later bought out American Arms and continued production of the American 180.

    The initial guns were chambered for .22 LR. One of the uses of this gun was for prisons. A few had a huge, bulky, gas tube laser mounted under the forearm. It's purpose was to intimidate troublemakers in a prison yard, and chew them to ribbons if they didn't stop. The gun was accurate and controllable, and did not suffer the overpenetration problems of the less accurate 30-30's that were in common use.

    There were some complaints that the .22 LR was not powerful enough for some large prison yards, and had too much trajectory. Unfortunately, the design precluded chambering in .22 WMRF. So a new cartridge was created, the .22 ILARCO (ILinois ARms COmpany). It's a .22 WMRF shortened to .22 LR length. It's also known as the .22 Short magnum Rimfire. I feel sorry for the owners of this version, because the ammo has been out of production for a long time. It's pretty much a collector's piece.

    If you've ever heard on of these fire, they're unmistakable. They should like a tearing bedsheet or chainsaw. The cyclic rate is 1500 rpm, same as some MG42s. Machine Gun News called it a "100 yard full choke shotgun" (see link for a lot more info and photos).
     
  15. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    <i>"I remember reading somewhere that four British water cooled machine guns fired over 1,000,000 rounds during one day of the Battle of the Somme river during WW I. "</i>

    True, but it was not four, but ten water cooled Vickers:

    "The best example of continuous fire really belongs to the First World War, but is worth retelling out of context because it applies equally to the Second World War, and was undoubtedly very nearly, if not actually repeated in the classic formal battles of Alamein and the Mareth Line. On the Somme in 1916 was the 100th Company of the Machine Gun Corps (a special corps formed in the First World War to use machineguns in the support role.) On the 24th August it had ten Vickers guns in position and was ordered to support an attack with rapid fire. An area had to be neutralized for twelve hours to prevent any enemy crossing it during that period. The range was 2,00 yards. Some infantry were provided as ammunition and water parties. The guns fired at the rapid rate for the required twelve hours with no major break downs, and all were in action at the end of the time. Each gun fired an average of 8,300 rounds (edit - this is per hour), making a grand total for the 10 of 1,000,000. The best gun fired at the rate of 10,000 rounds per hour, the others slightly less. Each gun would have to change its barrel at about 10,000 rounds, so that 100 or so barrels must have been used. Water for cooling the barrels was required in continuous quantities, and only just lasted the action. A hand driven machine for filling belts was worked throughout, but can hardly have kept pace, so that considerable stocks of filled belts must have been dumped beforehand. Later it was found that the target area had been kept completely clear of all movement during the twelve hours. One can hardly be surprised at that! 1,000,000 rounds is an awful lot to have falling on one piece of countryside, and quite apart from the lethality of them, the noise of their arrival must have sounded like a non-stop Western film." - Infantry Weapons by John Weeks (Ballantine war books)
     
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