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avoided disater,or being anal/ have peace of mind

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by dhip, Jul 13, 2010.

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  1. dhip

    dhip Active Member

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    Well,new to reloading and I know many of you load 100's of shells each time you sit down. I on the other hand sometimes just go and sit by my mec 9000 and load a couple boxes.This past weekend I loaded 3 boxes,nothing great. However I had a couple moments that had been bothering me.Handle wouldn't go all the way down,and yes when I tried it poured what seemed a double load of shot in the shell,shot all over,this happened a couple times.Well after the first time I decided just manually adjust shot in shell by comparing to others and go ahead and finish crimping,as long as the crimp looked fine,shouldn't be any problem.Later when it happened again,I thought,whoa,maybe I should check powder drop in shell in powder drop station.Yep it was high,didn't measure it but it definetly was high.Luckily I only did 3 boxes.All day monday I kept thinking,what about the possible 2 shells before that?Well this morning I woke up at 5 am,decided to bite the bullet so to speak,and dismantle all 3 boxes and weigh powder to see if I could find any discrepency in powder drop.Needless to say,LESSON LEARNED,have a screw up,stop, check everything right then. OK,only found 1 shell out of sorts for my loads. I load 1oz. with 18.5-19gr of green dot.The one shell had 25.5grns in it. Don't know if that was at a dangerous level,but at least I have peace of mind.

    Am I being to cautious? I don't think so.

    Doug H.
     
  2. TrapCrazy

    TrapCrazy TS Member

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    It happens to everyone. I was paranoid when I started and got up and weighted about 200 shells I loaded one night. I cut some open and weighed them as well.
     
  3. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    It would have been load but it wouldn't have blown up your gun or anything. You learned the lesson. any time something funky happens just stop. I like to watch the bar as it goes across and make isure it goes all the way over to each side every time.

    This seems to catch 99% of the mistakes. You can feel in your hand the things you can't see and that is most often that shot has bridged in the tube and then it's a simple matter of looking at the shell that is being pre-crimped.

    Re-loading is a job. In as much as so many of us find it fun and relaxing it is still a job that requires your full attention. Most of the mistakes that have got by me over the years I can attribute to not paying 100% attention. You wouldn't screw around with TNT while you were watching a basket ball game and reloading shells really is the same thing as much as we don't want to admit it. Jeff
     
  4. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I would say that you handled the problem well and learned to be more proactive in the future. Most of us have been there, done that and when we see that first out of spec shell come off the press we stop and find the cause.

    FWIW, I also prefer to load in small batches like 100 in a session each day as opposed to the long marathon loading sessions. Keeping a sharp focus on what you are doing is important.
     
  5. jimrich60

    jimrich60 Member

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    You were being neither anal nor overcautious. Anytime something goes wrong, an error occurs, whatever, the only sane and sensible thing to do is stop the reloading process, clear the entire machine, check each and every shell in that group, correct any errors, check the powder and shot drops for jams and hangups, and only then proceed. Sure, most times the mistake won't be fatal, but what about that one time? Would you really want to take the chance with that tresured trap gun, or worse yet, yourself or someone in your shooting squad? Didn't think so. Well done on checking all those shells. You just might have ended up saving a gun, yourself, or others.

    Jim R
     
  6. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Next time ... before taking all those shells apart, try this!

    Take a piece of heavy cardboard and cut a slot in it just a little smaller than a finished shell. Put a 100 watt lite bulb behind it and hold the shell up to the hole.

    Just like an X-ray! (doesn't work on paper or black hulls)

    Makes spotting no powder, too much powder or cocked wads a lot easier!

    Werks fer me!
     
  7. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Why not weigh the each entire loaded shell before dismantling all those rounds? The total weight will indicate which shells are overweight.
     
  8. Ray Collins

    Ray Collins Active Member

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    Setterman's suggestion appears sound as long as the weight of the hulls and wads are consistant.

    What do the experienced loaders think?

    Ray
     
  9. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Some people should not reload. Are you one of them?
     
  10. Bernie K

    Bernie K Member

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    I found years ago to help narrow down tracking this problem was to number each box loaded and if a problem of no powder pops up you can go a few boxes ahead and see if the problem is still there. Not a hot idea to load and dump them in a big bucket. If you have a problem , how do you know where it started? Just a thought.
     
  11. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    It's always better to err on the side of caution. While I doubt one load as you described would have caused a gun to disintegrate, I wouldn't be taking any chances. If something does not seem right, stop and check it out. If you need to break apart a few boxes of loads to be sure, it's best to do so. Some people load pretty close to the edge, so it could have different outcomes. Load an extra seven grains of WAALite, Clays, or Alliant Extra Lite into an already near max pressure load, and it could be a bad thing. With some of the dense powders, it might be hard to tell.
     
  12. dhip

    dhip Active Member

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    shot410ga.
    ,,,,NO,,,just new and not afraid to discuss something others would hide,,maybe some would just shrug their shoulders and go on if they were NEW to it as I..I appreciate MOST posted replies by the knowledgeable people on this site.

    Doug H.
     
  13. Spanky

    Spanky Active Member

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    dhip, you can't go wrong with your gut feeling and how you handled it. Better safe than sorry. It's great that you found basically no problem and the couple that were slightly off would not have been injured you. Heck you can salvage damn near everything but the hulls. Hopefully you found out what your machine, human error or component problem was.

    I sometime (most times) load in big batches (trap loads) on one machine in particular and smaller lots for skeet, sporting and sub-gauge on others. 100 shells on a progressive will kick out very fast. I find that larger lots will go better because you get into a better rythm, and if possible keep your bench organized and in order. Short stroking with a progressive will get you into trouble quick. But, I think if this happens again to you just isolate the shells on the machine and a few of the just finished shells and you'll be fine. Your situation has happened to every reloader at least once at some point of their reloading history.
     
  14. JTEA

    JTEA Member

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    I have a couple colored "rings" made of plastic twist tie material that I put over a couple on the dies on my PW's. I gives you something visual that you see has changed position if you aren't watching closely. I use them to mark a change in hulls such as shot size, #100, different primer etc. Makes it easier as I may stop loading for the time but return later and quickly remember where I was. I also put them on dies if I suspect a problem such as a cocked wad petal or a wad which didn't seat etc. I don't recall any double load problems with the PW's, but I used to save the unsure loads from my Hornady and shoot them in a 3" chamber auto-loader.

    JT
     
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