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Attachable high Ribs?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by shot410ga, Jul 25, 2011.

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  1. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    I've tried a couple of attachable high ribs, and have seen my scores plummet. Have any of you experienced the same? Have you gone back to the original rib? They seem more comfortable and sure keep my head up higher, but I am really erratic with them. I will go along inking everything and then I miss everything. No chips, just complete misses. Back line and front line, but a lot more in handicap.
     
  2. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

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    I guess I have never heard of an attachable high rib. How does it attach, is it adjustable, and how permanent is it? thanks Bill Wheeler
     
  3. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    There are a few manufacturers. Mine are Keen Ribs, non-adjustable. One is 3/8" the other is 3/4" They are glued on using Permatex to the original rib.
     
  4. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    Couple summers ago there were some people in the "shell house" at the Grand grafting what looked like bridgework, atop people's ribs for a price. Always wondered how the customers were able to shoot those things. They weren't there the following Grand.

    One guess is your "fire-control-computer" is having trouble with your new sight picture. It may be a case where it needs a peripheral image of the barrel to figure out when to pull the trigger. Some folks have this trouble when they go to an unsingle. You should have seen me when I went from an 870 field gun to a Browning Citori Plus. It was QUITE a while before I felt I'd spent my money wisely.

    Have you tried shooting patterning boards with both setups?

    Good luck.
     
  5. N. J. BOB

    N. J. BOB Active Member

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    POI ????? Head on the stock ???? Eye on the rock ???
     
  6. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Stop thinking, and concentrate! Our brains can't do both at the same time.
     
  7. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    When you use a high rib you have to be careful about the distance you shoot the bird at. You get a vertical POI change at different yardages because the shot string is coming up from below and passing through the POA and then dropping back down when gravity causes it to fall. With a rib mounted close to the barrel you don't have to worry about that. HMB
     
  8. GrandpasArms

    GrandpasArms Active Member

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    Doesn't seem to be working for me - so far.

    I had noticed that I was getting a very sore neck from shooting and decided that a higher rib might help remove the pain because I'd be shooting with my head more upright. I added 3/4 inch to the rib and had an adjustable comb installed so I could match the higher rib with a higher comb (on my BT99 34").

    My scores have suffered and the neck pain is as bad - or worse - than before. I have shot 23s and 24s with the new setup and there was a 5 and a 9 in the mix as well. The really poor scores usually happened at the end of an evening.

    I am seriously considering removing the rib and lowering the comb, but I'll decide on that after my next practice shoot. If the weather is as nice tomorrow morning as it is right now, I plan to go to a range and see about having my own trap field for an our (or 100 to 150 rounds).

    I kept the rib and made sure the stock was set to align the sight picture. Discovered that the front fiber bead was skewed. Fixed it. Shot 100 rounds yesterday morning and I am pleased with all of the mods (all scores in the 20s). I even did fairly well at 27 yards. All of this with 7/8 ounce of #7 1/2. No more messing with this gun. The work and anguish were worth it. I now know what settings are best for me.

    Larry
     
  9. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    <i>"When you use a high rib you have to be careful about the distance you shoot the bird at. You get a vertical POI change at different yardages because the shot string is coming up from below and passing through the POA and then dropping back down when gravity causes it to fall. With a rib mounted close to the barrel you don't have to worry about that. HMB</i>

    Really? How much?
     
  10. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Depends on how high the rib is, and at what distance the gun is zeroed in at. HMB
     
  11. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

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    Maybe a dumb question, but you do have an adjustable comb, right?
     
  12. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    HMB,

    Give me an example where it would make an appreciable difference, because I don't think it does.

    By my calculations, even if your rib is six inches above the centerline of the barrel, the difference is so minuscule it can be completely ignored. Less than an inch difference in POI from 30 to 40 yards versus a rib that is an inch above the barrel centerline.

    Show me I'm wrong.

    Don't forget to account for pellet drop.
     
  13. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I have shot the high rib TMX for over 24 years but there are definitely some times and light conditions where my scores are really in the tank and I realize that I have shot off the mass of the barrel and have seen right through the high rib as though it was totally transparent. I think this is a form of crossfiring that I label 'vertical crossfiring' and it is getting worse as I get older. My conventional rib MX3 is more intuitive to point.
     
  14. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget to account for pellet drop. At 30 yards the shot string passes through the POA, as it continues on it continues to rise with the high rib gun. With the low rib gun the shot string is falling when it passes 30 yards. The difference in flight path between the two, increases the error with the high rib gun. Make sense? HMB
     
  15. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    HMB,

    No, it doesn't make sense at all.

    We're talking fractions of a degree of angle difference between the two cases. The path of travel is almost the exact same.

    There's not enough difference to even give it a passing thought.

    I think, at most, you are talking about less than an inch of variation in POI from a tall rib to a short rib at the distances you normally break the target.

    Therefore, I believe your statement, <i>"you have to be careful about the distance you shoot the bird at"</i> is absolute nonsense.

    Prove me wrong. Show your calculations.
     
  16. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I think that Neil admitted that there is a significant margin of error when you attempt to use 13 yards for calculating POI with a high rib gun or unsingle but the error should be resolved when you pattern at 40 yards.
     
  17. dead on 4

    dead on 4 Well-Known Member

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    That's odd, I shoot a Perazzi Grand American unsingle with a 1" add on rib, it has a 60/40 poi also a BT-99 with a 1" add on adjustable rib which brings the total rib height to 1-3/8" and a TMX that's 3/4" high. The only time I get into trouble is when I lose my basics and don't stay with the gun which is more often than not as I age. I shoot all these guns the same a as flat ribbed TM-1. I can not tell a poa difference between any of these even at 70 yard pot targets.

    Any top shooter will tell you, you must put through X number of targets with a new gun to make it part of you. When you added a rib, you essentially are shooting a new gun and need to stay with it for a while before you walk away. It's always good basics that keep top shooters in the winners circle. If its bothering your neck it may be a fit issue.

    Surfer
     
  18. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen, you have to define your parameters when you argue points such as these.

    Firstly, at any given distance the shot drop from the 1" high ribbed gun will be exactly the same as from the 6" high ribbed gun. For any POI=POA (zero) distance, the discrepancy will be so insignificant you can consider is exactly the same. In any event, you can eliminate is for any calculations relevant to this argument.

    Zero points do matter, as hmb says. How much they matter is determined by the zero distance. Take a 40 yard zero. Both guns strike POA at 40 yards. The barrel of the 6" ribbed gun starts out 5" lower than the other, so its POI is 2.5" lower at 20 yards and 1.25" lower at 30 yards. As timb99 says, not much difference.

    Now take the other extreme, a 13 yard zero. The 1" gun's barrel points 2" high at 40 yards while the 6" gun's barrel points 12" high. That is a HUGE difference. And just for those who insist shot drop is relevant, the 1" gun prints 1" low and the 6" gun 9" high at 40 yards. Any way you slice it, there is a 10" POI difference at 40 yards.
     
  19. Zardozforty

    Zardozforty Member

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    I agree with miketmx's first post.

    Before voice calls, when we had pullers, on poor visibilty days, I didn't shoot my Grand American worth a darned. Good calls and good visibilty.

    I've shot an MX-3 for years, and I tend to shoot off the barrel.

    If the rib and barrel are very close, under less than ideal conditions, I shoot the MX-3 better.
     
  20. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    zzt,

    Your last paragraph is not an accurate assessment for trap shooting, and after all, that is what we are talking about, right?

    The defined parameters are a "typical" trap shotgun.

    Nobody sets a trap shotgun to hold a "zero point" at all, much less one that is at 13 yards. That would be meaningless for the purposes of trap shooting. They set a trap shotgun to center the pattern POI "X" inches high at 35 yards, or some similar number.

    And by my reckoning, regardless of whether your gun bead is affixed to the top of the barrel, or whether it is 3" or 4" above it, if the two guns are set to pattern to the same POI at target distance, there will be no "discernible" difference in POI regardless of whether the shooter breaks the target at 25 yards or 45 yards.

    Which is why I say that HMB's statement, <i>"you have to be careful about the distance you shoot the bird at"</i> is nonsense.

    And forums like these are the places where folks who don't know any better get the idea that there is some validity to what HMB said, and a new shotgun shooting myth that has no basis in reality is born (or an old one is perpetuated.)
     
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