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Arrrgh! I bought a gun with automatic safety!

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Questor, Dec 31, 2007.

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  1. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    Not related to target shooting, but I bought a field gun that's the 12 gauge sibling of my 20 gauge. Both guns are Beretta 686 Silver Pigeons. The new gun is the Silver Pigeon S, which I really like the handling of. I like everything about it. However there is one problem. The newer model has an automatic safety, and I don't like this feature.

    Do you happen to know if a gunsmith can disable this feature without otherwise affecting the gun? My guess is yes because the older 20 gauge has a manual safety and is the same basic model. The older (10 years old) 20 gauge is a sporting clays version and that's probably why it has a manual safety.
     
  2. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Most likely, though I am not sure for this exact model. Usually it is a bar or rod connected to the safety and actuated by the action lock, so that when the locking lugs move backwards to disengage the monoblock, the bar pushed the safety back too.

    Chances are, if you're mechanically inclined, you could probably figure it out and disable it yourself.

    Probably a piece of cake for a gunsmith.

    Although, quite frankly, the auto-safety is a feature I kind of like for hunting.
     
  3. 682LINY

    682LINY Member

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    did my 686 myself ,when I was using for trap gun,,,not too hard to take out the bar that sets the safty,,,manual still works
     
  4. code5coupe

    code5coupe Member

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    I know the auto safety was bothering me when I got my first Ruger Red Label. I took the stock off, figured out how the auto safety was acuated, and disabled it myself. Doesn't take a rocket scientist... I'm sure you can do it (if I did).
    Since then, I've disabled the safeties on my last three RRL's.
     
  5. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    As a factory trained gunsmith for various brands, I will not disable a safety device for reasons of liability. Please do not blast a gunsmith for not doing what factories stress to not do.

    With that said, the Beretta IS a piece of cake to disable the auto safety. If one has a small amount of mechanical aptitude, the fix will jump out at you. It takes longer to remove and re install the stock than to disable the auto safety. ;^)
     
  6. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    Thank you for taking the time to answer. I appreciate it.

    I didn't realize that there were liability concerns with this. After all, most guns have manual safeties.
     
  7. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Guns with a tang lever usually have a rod or bar that pushes the safety back every time the lever is worked. Easily rmoved.

    What liability is the manual safety on the pumps and autos?

    HM
     
  8. Questor

    Questor TS Member

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    sarge:

    I agree. The issue in this case is not to disable the safety, but to disable the automatic safety. I would still use the safety as a manual safety for field use.
     
  9. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    sarge,

    He's not talking about disabling the safety. Just disabling the feature that puts the safety back to the safe position when you open the action.

    Some break action guns come from the factory this way, others don't.
     
  10. newcastle

    newcastle Member

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    Please let me know what you find out with your 686, I took a look at mine, took spring out, pin out and safety out ect , found it to be to much trouble so I put it back together. I think you have to take that plate out that is held in with screw that also holds the spring down but I didn't have the proper tools to disassemble.
     
  11. code5coupe

    code5coupe Member

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    Factory liability??

    Ruger will happily convert the auto safety to manual safety on their guns if the owner requests it....no charge.
     
  12. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    That was the first thing I did when I started using my Winchester Model 24 for cowboy shoots - get rid of the damn automatic safety. I'm conditioned enough that I don't need to have it automatically applied, and if I need to make more than two shots, I don't want it in the way. And it took more time to take the gun apart than it took to defeat the safety. It's been so many years that I forgot this model had an automatic safety until I read this thread.
     
  13. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Automatic safeties are terrible for a clay target gun. Further, I don't think that automatic safeties are a good idea..... even for hunting. Here is why.

    As far as I know, there is no practical way of putting an automatic safety on a pump or autoloading shotgun, and I can't think of any reason for having one even if it could be done. So, a person buys an O/U with an automatic safety and gets used to the safety doing his thinking for him. Then he decides to buy or borrow a pump or auto to take hunting. Guess what is going to happen???

    Yep, he will forget that he has to manually apply the safety to the pump or auto and may end up shooting someone because of it. Yeah, if he always keeps the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, it really shouldn't matter, but why get used to an automatic safety on one type of shotgun when you know that they are impossible to have on several other types of shotguns?
     
  14. smartass

    smartass TS Member

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    I disabled the auto safety on my 686 a couple of years ago. Don't remember everything about it, but it wasn't hard. There is a screw that must be removed, but it's not easy to get to. Had to use a pair of needle nose pliers to remove the screw. After that it was easy.
     
  15. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Jim, your dad was a smart one. That lesson ha served you a lifetime.

    I was (am) tough as nails with my kids for gun safety. To the point of taking hunter's safety so we'd be oon the same exact page. (I took it as a kid, but there have been some changes over the years.) Consequently, they've been given invites for hunting by adults who've observed them in the field. One will gladly let them hunt over his hunting dogs "any time", and you know how dog owners are about safety converning their "babies".
     
  16. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Easystreet,

    For hunting, I switch back and forth effortlessly between a SxS with an auto-safety, an over/under with a manual safety, and two different pump guns, one with a tang safety and one with a cross-bolt.

    Checking the safety is second nature for me.

    Know your equipment, and you'll be fine.
     
  17. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    timb99,

    Sure, having different types of safeties on a variety of different guns is no problem for the experienced and safety conscious shooter/hunter, but you might be surprised how many "hunters" don't know the difference between a 12 gauge and a 20 gauge or what a choke tube is for. The hunting fields and woods (and even many of the shooting ranges) have far more of these type inexperienced hunters/shooters than you could imagine.

    That's why I don't think automatic safeties are a good idea. For the newbie, it gets him/her used to a device that may not be present on the next gun he/she picks up, but they are too new to shooting to know the difference. I favor making all safeties manual. That way, a person doesn't begin to depend on the gun to do his thinking for him. He will know (or quickly learn) to search for the safety when he wants the safety in the "ON" position rather than rely on some mechanical device to do it for him. At the same time, he will learn that safety is dependent upon his own actions and not some function built into the gun.
     
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