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Arlen Sphincter

Discussion in 'Politics, Elections & Legislation' started by halfmile, Apr 29, 2009.

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  1. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Trying to figure out why the Obamination spent all that tv time blasting hot air praising him.

    The more they talk the worse it gets.

    HM
     
  2. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Arlen or Open?
     
  3. atashooter

    atashooter Member

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    Specter... AMF, who needs De Moeder Faquier.
     
  4. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like the perfect dumocrat.

    "JEFF JACOBY
    Courage, and the lack of it

    By Jeff Jacoby, Globe Columnist | May 3, 2009

    ARLEN SPECTER would never have made it into "Profiles In Courage." Unlike the senators described in John F. Kennedy's book - men who remained true to their principles, even when it meant paying a steep political price - Specter has never been celebrated for his backbone.

    Forty-odd years ago, Specter abandoned the Democrats in order to win election to Congress as a Republican; five days ago, he abandoned the Republicans in order to win reelection as a Democrat. As he announced his defection, he all but admitted that he was acting out of naked expediency. "I have . . . surveyed the sentiments of the Republican Party in Pennsylvania and public opinion polls," he told reporters, "and have found that the prospects for winning a Republican primary are bleak." According to a new poll, only 30 percent of Pennsylvania Republicans were supporting Specter's renomination, while 51 percent favored his conservative rival.

    When Vermont Senator James Jeffords defected from the GOP in 2001, Specter blasted his perfidy, and said senators should be barred from changing parties in midsession. As recently as two weeks ago, he assured voters that he wouldn't do such a thing. Asked whether he might consider running as an independent or Democrat, Specter staunchly replied: "I am a Republican and I am going to run on the Republican ticket in the Republican primary."

    But if Specter is no profile in courage, there are others in the public eye who are, as two admirable American women have recently reminded us.

    Carrie Prejean and Mary Ann Glendon could hardly seem more dissimilar. Prejean is a 21-year-old California beauty queen and model; Glendon is a Harvard law professor and a former US ambassador to the Vatican. What they have in common is a greater respect for honesty than for political correctness, and for the obligations of moral witness than for their own personal prestige.

    Glendon made news last week when she refused to accept the University of Notre Dame's illustrious Laetare Medal, the most distinguished honor in American Catholic life. The medal was to have been presented on May 17, when President Barack Obama will receive an honorary degree and deliver the commencement address. Notre Dame is the nation's foremost Catholic university, and its decision to honor Obama - a supporter of unrestricted abortion rights - has been sharply criticized by Catholics who share their church's deep opposition to abortion.

    In a letter to Notre Dame's president, Glendon expressed dismay that the university would bestow a high honor on someone so hostile to such a fundamental Catholic principle, in flat disregard of church guidelines. Worse, it was using her appearance to deflect criticism, suggesting in its "talking points" that Obama's address to the graduates would be balanced by Glendon's brief remarks. Unwilling to let her presence be exploited in this way, Glendon renounced the medal.

    Unlike Glendon, who had weeks to reflect before making her decision, Prejean had only seconds. In the final round of the recent Miss USA Pageant, Prejean was asked by one of the judges - the gay gossip blogger who calls himself Perez Hilton - whether she thought every state should legalize same-sex marriage. It was, she later said, the question she dreaded most - "I prayed I would not be asked about gay marriage" - knowing that an honest answer would hurt her chances of winning.

    She gave the honest answer. "I think it's great that Americans are able to choose one or the other," Miss California replied, but "I believe that a marriage should be between a man and a woman. No offense to anyone out there, but that's how I was raised."

    As she foresaw, the crown went to another contestant. What she may not have foreseen was the wave of condemnation that followed. Immediately after the pageant, the judge who had asked the question publicly berated her, snarling in an online video: "Miss California lost because she's a dumb. . ." California pageant officials slammed her, too; "religious beliefs," one wrote, "have no place in politics in the Miss CA family." Village Voice columnist Michael Musto went on Keith Olbermann's TV show to slander Prejean as "dumb and twisted . . . a human Klaus Barbie doll."

    It is not always easy to have the courage of one's convictions, to turn down honor for the sake of truth, or to resist the pressure to be politically correct. A law professor and a beauty queen have just shown us how it is done.

    Jeff Jacoby can be reached at jacoby@globe.com."
     
  5. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    We need more real people instead of a country full of goddamn cardboard cutouts.

    Spector had a specialty of pissing in people's cornflakes. I think his Idol was Joe McCarthy, and he kept trying to make trouble but never got prominent with it.

    I hope someone digs a skeleton out of his closet.

    HM
     
  6. Milkbone

    Milkbone TS Member

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    If Spector wins the Democratic nomination, I will contribute to his opponent- whoever he or she might be. Like they say: money talks and BS walks.
     
  7. PAR8HED

    PAR8HED Member

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    I'm reminded of Sir Winston Churchill, "Anyone can rat, but it takes a certain ingenuity to re-rat." Sadly, Mr. Specter shows none of the leadership qualities for which Churchill became known.
     
  8. AJKohler

    AJKohler Member

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    I keep thinking that his name used to be Arlen Smersh.

    Tony
     
  9. Bluzman98

    Bluzman98 Member

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    He must be getting senile.....

    He is now saying that Jack Kemp would be still alive today if it weren't for the GOP agenda on healthcare and cancer research. He then turns around and says that because of the reseach his and others' lives have been prolonged. So what's his point???

    That comment about Jack Kemp has got to be one of the stupidest made yet. Is he smoking crack or did he ask Biden for some input?

    JMHO

    Jim C
     
  10. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    6,487
    These slimebags were made for each other.

    "Meltdown: Specter stands alone
    By: Glenn Thrush and Manu Raju
    May 6, 2009 01:18 PM EST

    Arlen Specter infuriated Senate Republicans when he bolted from their party last week. Now he’s alienated just about everybody in the Senate Democratic caucus, too.

    Since declaring himself a Democrat last Tuesday, Specter has defied Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and the White House on virtually everything that’s come down the pike: the budget, mortgage reform, the Al Franken-Norm Coleman race, even President Barack Obama’s appointment of Dawn Johnsen to head the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel.

    All while quibbling over whether he said he’d be a “loyal Democrat” — and insisting that he had an “entitlement” to transfer his Senate seniority from one side of the aisle to the other.

    The blowback came Tuesday night: On a voice vote, the Senate voted to strip Specter of his 29 years of seniority, effectively transforming him in a blink-and-you-missed-it-moment from one of the most senior senators in the body to a lowly freshman on most committees.

    "There were concerns about his actions," said Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), chairwoman of the Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee, which sets committee assignments.

    In a statement released Wednesday afternoon, Specter said that Reid had promised him that he could transfer his seniority to the Democratic Party.

    “Sen. Reid assured me that I would keep my committee assignments and that I would have the same seniority as if I had been elected as a Democrat in 1980,” Specter said. “It was understood that the issue of subcommittee chairmanships would not be decided until after the 2010 election. Some members of the caucus have raised concerns about my seniority, so the caucus will vote on my seniority at the same time subcommittee chairmanships are confirmed after the 2010 election. I am confident my seniority will be maintained under the arrangement I worked out with Sen. Reid.”

    Specter said in the statement that he would “continue to be a staunch and effective advocate for Pennsylvania¹s and the nation's priorities.” But as early as Tuesday afternoon, the Pennsylvania Republican-turned-Democrat seemed to know that he’d be doing that from something akin to freshman status.

    Sen. Jeff Sessions, just selected to take Specter's former spot as the ranking Republican on the Judiciary Committee, asked Specter on Tuesday where he would be sitting during committee proceedings.

    "At the end of the other side of the aisle," a dejected Specter responded, according to a first-hand account of the conversation.

    Democratic staffers say Reid may have tolerated Specter’s early splits with the party if he hadn’t simultaneously been so vocal in claiming he was entitled to keep his seniority and leapfrog over veteran Democrats on some of the Senate’s most powerful committees.

    Specter’s claim that he’d been promised as much sparked an in-house rebellion among longtime Democratic foot soldiers, including Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) and Tom Harkin (D-Iowa).

    Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), chairwoman of an Appropriations subcommittee who would have been passed over by the more senior Specter, said it would have been an unfair move.

    "When you get to be a chairman, you really have some control of that area, and that's what makes it interesting for me," Feinstein told POLITICO. "Somebody comes in on top — then everybody gets bumped. Then somebody gets bumped from the committee. That's a very hard thing if you've got 14 years having been on that committee. Obviously you'd like to stay where you are. I understand how people feel about it."

    Feinstein said she's heard other members complain about Specter keeping his seniority, too. "It's a concern, and I think Sen. Specter will understand that."

    By Tuesday night, Reid had no option but to strip Specter of his seniority, staffers with knowledge of the situation say. Reid preserved a vestige of his original promise to Specter by vowing to revisit the matter after the 2010 midterms.

    "Whenever you have a party switch like this, there has to be give and take, negotiation, and I think that's what happened here,” said Democrat Bob Casey, Pennsylvania’s other senator.

    “I think the reality is between now and then is — is he on the team or not?” a senior Democratic aide said Wednesday. “If he’s instrumental in getting health care done, I imagine his position in the caucus after 2010 will be substantially strengthened.”

    But that’s assuming that Specter is reelected — or even survives a Democratic primary.

    Republicans say the loss of seniority robs Specter of a key argument in a general election race against former Republican Rep. Pat Toomey or perhaps former Gov. Tom Ridge — that Specter’s seniority and experience will allow him to deliver more goodies to the Keystone State.

    "It's kind of hard to make the argument that you should be returned to the Senate because of your clout when you're the junior most senator on every committee," said Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. "I imagine that will be the subject of some discussion on the campaign."

    Julian Zelizer, a political science expert at Princeton University, said the seniority move will be even more damaging in a primary, allowing an opponent — perhaps Democratic Rep. Joe Sestak — to dismiss arguments that Specter has more clout.

    “This is a body blow for Pennsylvania,” Zelizer said. “It certainly is not a great deal for Specter, who will look like diminished figure in the primaries as a result.”

    One more problem for Specter: Liberal groups are turning up the volume on calls for a competitive Democratic Senate primary in Pennsylvania. "Our elected officials should have to compete for their seats, and Arlen Specter is no exception," said Arshad Hasan, executive director of Democracy for America, a 725,000-member political action committee.

    If Specter were to keep his seat and retain his seniority, he would leapfrog nearly the entire Democratic caucus. He’d be tied for seventh in seniority with Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.), and he’d be line to fight for coveted subcommittee chairmanships on the powerful Appropriations Committee, potentially chair the Environment and Public Works Committee and take the reins of the Judiciary Committee if Sen. Pat Leahy (D-Vt.), who is more senior, steps aside.

    On Wednesday, Leahy told reporters he had “no idea” Specter would lose his seniority, adding, "You should talk to Sen. Reid; it was his decision."

    Asked if he was fine with Specter losing his seniority, Leahy said: "I'm just glad Sen. Specter is on the committee. He's a very valued senator; we have a 40-year friendship, the two of us. I'm delighted he's there."

    Other Democrats, including Mary Landrieu (D-La.), Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) all said they were kept in the dark about Reid’s decision. Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said he was in the loop but referred all questions to the leader.

    Members are fiercely territorial and use their much-prized committee positions to shower their constituents with legislative gold. They balked at the possibility of being replaced by someone who simply switched parties to preserve his political career. In interviews with POLITICO, several Democrats said they were in no mood to give up their gavels either this Congress or next — and several expressed their views directly to Reid over the past several days.

    In the end, aides, it was a no-brainer to strip Specter of his seniority: Specter is now a Democrat and has no choice but to try to ingratiate himself with the Democratic Caucus if he wants to retain his seniority after this Congress.

    Specter tried to make some amends with members of his new party Tuesday. After word leaked out that he’d told The New York Times that the courts in Minnesota should “do justice” and name Republican Norm Coleman the winner over Democrat Al Franken, Specter backpedaled, telling CQ that he had “conclusively misspoke” in “the swirl of moving from one caucus to another.”

    Victoria McGrane, Martin Kady II and Michael Falcone contributed to this story."
     
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