1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Applying Graphite to Shot

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Nascar Mike, Jun 12, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Nascar Mike

    Nascar Mike TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    Messages:
    19
    I am looking for information and any help offered to apply graphite to shot. What type of graphite and where is the best place to buy it? Any good tips for applying it to a lot of shot? Any help or thoughts on the subject would help. Thank You Mike
     
  2. 4th. down

    4th. down Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    654
    http://www.graphitestore.com/index.asp

    Decide how much you want to put on the shot, then cut that in 1/2 - a little goes a long, long, way. With hard shot it will improve your patterns - helps to keep the shot from clumping together and helps prevent the little shot strings of 5-6 pellets all in a row, that we see in patterns.
     
  3. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    Go to your farm tractor place. I got my graphit at the John Deere place. Try any tractor store and they should have it or be able to order it.
     
  4. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2006
    Messages:
    3,522
    Location:
    Blackshear, Georgia
    Listen to what these guys are saying. I thought they needed more graphite and put 3 tablespoons per 50 pounds and you really wouldn't believe the mess it has caused. It will cause your hulls to look really dirty and make your hands dirty every time you shoot. Your barrel will get really dirty too. One tablespoon per 50 pounds would be max for me. Jackie B.
     
  5. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,482
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    And hard as this will be to believe, too much graphite on shot can cause some loaders to clog. I once purchased some Lawrence brand shot and some of it was really "dirty." I was using my RCBS Grand at the time and was experiencing problems with the shot gate sticking open. When RCBS told me the problem was too much graphite on the the shot, I reminded them that graphite was a lubricant but they insisted it would be the cause of my problem, so I cleaned the gate and refilled the reservoir with shot from another lot number. Problem gone!

    The next bag I opened was also a "dirty" batch and half-way through a flat of empty hulls, the gate stuck again. I checked that bag's lot number against the last two empty bags (I keep them for my club to make rifle range sandbags) and was able to determine that I had eight bags of the "dirty" lot in the batch I had bought. I called Lawrence - they confirmd that too much graphite can cause problems and shipped me eight replacement bags of shot.

    Come on, fellas - put those phones down!

    Ed
     
  6. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,787
    Be careful what type of coolant you use to much soap in antifreeze along with to much graphic will clump the shot together. Been there and done that. You want the finished shot shiny not black. To little is better than to much.
     
  7. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    Once you make shot there is two ways to put on your graphite. One is with a cement mixer. The other is with an army ammo can. I put 25 pounds of shot in it and 1 tb spoon of graphite. I will put some shot in the can and sprinkle just a little graphite on, put some more shot in then sprinkle some graphite in and so on. I then will roll the can and shack the can till I know the two are mixed together.
     
  8. GoldEx

    GoldEx Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,228
    Location:
    Howell, MI
    P3AT is right. About a teaspoon per 100# or so seems to work well for me.

    JK
     
  9. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,449
    Use the smallest amount possiable and tumble the shot longer. The shot will turn Black instead of Silver if you have more than you need. To much will cause problems on about any reloader.

    Ajax
     
  10. dead on 4

    dead on 4 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    3,070
    I have a long handled flat head screw driver which I spoon a small amount onto the blade. This is dumped and mixed into a 1 lb coffee can. Total amout is less than a teaspoon per 100#. Any moore product than this makes a mess..... I've been working from the same quart container for thirty years and still have a quarter of a can remaing

    Surfer
     
  11. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,942
    Location:
    Knob Noster, Mo
    This is how I do it. Jim



    <embed width="600" height="361" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowFullscreen="true" allowNetworking="all" wmode="transparent" src="http://static.photobucket.com/player.swf" flashvars="file=http%3A%2F%2Fvidmg.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fv337%2FJim45%2FShot%2520Maker%2Fshotpolishing.mp4">
     
  12. psfive

    psfive Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
    Messages:
    672
    Like 4th. down says decide how much then cut it in half. You can always add more. I had over done it one time and the only thing I heard was, what kind of powder is that it sure is dirty. I just said Clays sure got some strange looks. You could see the black cloud around the shot. Lesson learned. Paul in Nebraska.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.