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Anyone still shoot an Ithaca Flues SBT

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Bushmaster1313, Dec 23, 2009.

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  1. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,605
    Curious if anyone on the forum still shoots an Ithaca Flues single barrel trap.

    I was considering buying one for its beauty, but I would also want it to be capable of light duty use.
     
  2. 333t

    333t Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    281
    I bought a 1919 Flues SBT a while ago and have shot it a fair amount. Its a Victory model with the straight stock. It shoots just fine and looks to be built very stout. The action is the last Flues version with the top cross-bolt, I doubt this would ever shoot loose. I also have a later Knick model and to me, the Flues lockup looks more positive. I wouldn't hesitate to buy a Flues SBT for everyday shooting.

    Phil
     
  3. Hinkton

    Hinkton TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Messages:
    120
    Hi If you buy a Ithaca S.B.T.gun, i believe that the nick model is the one you should buy. Serial number 400.000 an above. I believe the bolt locking system is upgraded. There may be other differances, but i know they are more in demand. Hank
     
  4. OLD ONE EYE

    OLD ONE EYE Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,251
    Location:
    Florida / Idaho
    The big problem with the Flues is parts they are not easy to find and may have to be made. I have a friend with a Sousa grade Flues but I have never seen it. He has many 4e and 5e guns and a 7e shoots them ocassionally. The Flues are usually much less money but I would shoot one as they were high quality when made. It was made for trap a game with lots of shells a year.
     
  5. John Thompson

    John Thompson TS Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Messages:
    756
    I beleive the cut off point for the latest locking system is 403,xxx. The earlier guns were well built but not designed for the modern ammunition pressures. If any repairs are needed, parts will all have to be hand made. There was a retired Ithaca gunsmith in Richmond, Indiana that did great work on the early Ithaca's but that was 30 years back and he was in his 70's then. An old Flues or Nick would be a fine wall hanger but I would not shoot it 5000 times a year.
     
  6. samiam03

    samiam03 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    219
    Look at the gun - how is it built? Like a brick ___. To be on the safe side keep your pressures down and shoot the gun. Just because it doesn't have a raised comb or rib doesn't mean it can't break birds. I'll wager that the first time you mount the gun you'll powder the bird. It's a single purpose gun and through almost the last hundred years has probably broken more birds than all the K or P guns combined. It's a foundation gun that the history of trap shooting is built upon. It feels really good to step back in time and break birds with a cornerstone of our heritage.

    It was a real thrill to shoot my 1916 4E for the first time. Harlan and I patterned the gun and it shot 70-30. I'd love to add a 1975 model to my collection - I'd shoot it all the time.

    Sam
     
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