1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Anyone recognize this stuff?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by wireguy, Jan 27, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    There's a field near my home where I run my dogs. This chain link stuff is at one end being used for fencing. I've never seen anything like it. In the not so distant past this entire valley was a dairy operation so it might have something to do with farming?
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. TC

    TC TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    931
    I do not recognize it but it looks like a conveyer system for either silage or possibly a manure system.
     
  3. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,353
    Wow- would be expensive to do

    I will be interested to hear what it is used for

    Gene
     
  4. timberfaller

    timberfaller Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Messages:
    7,964
    Location:
    Eastern Washington
    Looks like someone knew how to recycle!!

    Looks to me like silage conveyer out of a wagon, must have come across a lot of wagons!!
     
  5. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    11,673
    Location:
    West Central Florida
    The square bars look like old window weights from an old school with large windows. I ran into them on a few window replacement projects. They should be approx. 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 and made of lead. Bulge.
     
  6. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    No, it's all wood on the cross bars. There was a dairy operation right across the road, so maybe a manure spreader or something? I don't think there was anything like grain crops grown here. What kind of plant would silage be? I know they flood irrigated here because I still have the concrete pipe network on my 1/2 acre.
     
  7. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,521
    Location:
    Idaho
    Ther from an old Manure spreader in the horse drawn days
     
  8. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    Cuban, did this thing take the manure out of the wagon and spread it? It's incredibly well made.
     
  9. Joe Woods

    Joe Woods Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,496
    Maybe a hay rake/ loader . Taking cut hay or straw from field and elevating it into wagon.

    Joe Woods/Ontario
     
  10. TC

    TC TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    931
    Think Joe is on the right track. Could be for a hay stacker. Have seen some that were rather tall. They weren't used to load wagons, they were used for stacking.
     
  11. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    Could anyone hazard a guess how old this thing might be?
     
  12. shooter99

    shooter99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,406
    Location:
    Blue River, Wisconsin
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O10DclYpoEI

    You tube video on old hay loader from the 40's

    Picture below is how the hay was put into the barn. It was a grapling type forks. These forks were on a track connected to the barn.With pullies and rope a tractor or horses were used to lift it up and move it on the track. A person would handle a trip rope so when the hay was in the right location they would pull the trip rope and release the hay. Pull it back and start over with the next load. I do not remember the loaders having a web type chain on them also the chain is not like most web type applications.

    gwii_2008_030389.jpg
     
  13. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    Yea, there's some kind of conveyor being used on that unit.
     
  14. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,461
    Yep--outstanding red-neck ingenuity--that's exactly what that is.



    Guy B.
     
  15. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    This thing is still in fantastic condition because it has been up off the ground for decades. It needs to be in a museum or restored.
     
  16. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,521
    Location:
    Idaho
    In the old days when I grew up on my Amish Grandfathers farm the manure spreader had something that looked like that on the floor. It was gear driven by the movement of the wheels and it moved the manure back to the back inch by inch. At the back there was a revolving set of arms ( much like a hay rake) that threw it onto the fields
     
  17. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    Thank you everyone for your commentary. I'm going to look around and back in the corner of this field and see if I can find the piece of equipment it came from. I am in awe of the quality this stuff is. There sure seems to be a lot of it for coming from just one piece of equipment.
     
  18. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,583
    Lead window weights. ROTFLMAO !!!!!!!!
     
  19. Sprinklerman

    Sprinklerman Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    765
    Location:
    Bassett, NE
    That is a floor drag for removing manure from a milk barn.
     
  20. Bob Schultz

    Bob Schultz Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,749
    Location:
    Tuxedo NC

    [​IMG]


    Check out the underside of this old manure spreader....
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.