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Any pilots here? Secret No Fly Zones

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, Jan 13, 2013.

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  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
  2. fly

    fly Active Member

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    http://www.faa.gov/pilots/safety/notams_tfr/media/tfrweb.pdf

    This will explain TFR's
     
  3. warren

    warren Member

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    I used to fly and know that the FAA is very arbitrary if you get their attention and failure to file notams can happen on their part. I'll be interesting to see how they follow up on this incident I wouldn't be suprised at all if they took his license that's what they're good at.

    warren
     
  4. fly

    fly Active Member

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    What should be expected of the FEDs if a pilot penetrates a TFR? Usually it is associated with fighter jets being scrambled.

    Pilots are required to know the airspace they are flying in. Sectionals do NOT have everything published in them, as they are basically a map.
     
  5. R.Kipling

    R.Kipling Well-Known Member

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    My grandson is taking flight lessons now, in southern Michigan. I was surprised to learn that he, and his CFI overfly a local Nuke plant regularly. There are no restrictions in that particular area.

    I'll be interested to see how this comes out. And, most interested in finding out if the glider pilot gave up his right to sue these jerks to end the case? I hope they include the answer in my AOPA magazine.

    BiO, you are correct, we have been living in a clandestine police state for a long time. And, it's only going to get worse.

    Kip
     
  6. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    You have someone at the tower and or plant who thinks because they have some power and so called knowledge they can do as they please and because its in the book they have to enforce it. If the pilot doesn't see a restricted zone on UP TO DATE charts there isn't much anyone can do. I feel the people went way to far on this and I wouldn't have made any deals and sued the hell out of the people in charge. Besides the cops have no right to even say shoot the plane. That alone if a fed charge just saying what he said.

    If they had a plane that had a engine then yes I would say there might be a chance of a problem, but a glider?????????????

    In and around some BIG airports(Dullas for example)there is now a 60 mile restricted zone around that airport. That means you have better have the clearance and the proper equimpment in your aircraft or your in BIG TROUBLE. That goes for planes, gliders, ultralight planes and hot air balloons.

    Monticello Thomas Jeffersons home is on a REQUEST RETRICTED ZONE(not to many of them around) but not a RESTRICTED ZONE. In other words they ask that you do not fly over Monticello. That was done by the manager who TRIED to force the gov to place a FAA Restricted zone. They said NO but in time(years) gave him a request restricted zone. If you fly over it your not in to much trouble. Its now on the maps.

    When flying in unknown areas look at up to date maps and or fly with pilots who know the area and that will keep you out of trouble.

    Just to let you all know I am a commercial pilot of lighter then air aircraft.
     
  7. R.Kipling

    R.Kipling Well-Known Member

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    The PIC always has the final responsibility for the safe and legal conduct of every flight. NOTAMS, TFR's, AIRMETS, SIGMETS are always available. This experienced glider pilot was attempting a 500km cross country. I find it difficult to believe that he did not check Wx and receive any/all pertinent information to that flight, even though it is not stated in the video.

    Long ago, and far away, I did the initial R/W training for two City and County LE agencies. I was surprised at the distinct lack of knowledge these administrations and individual officers possessed regarding general FAR's. The over-reaction of today's LEO's no longer surprises me, it just continues to disappoint me.

    Kip
     
  8. rivercityjeff

    rivercityjeff Member

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    NOTAMS or "notice to airmen" are require knowledge for flying. And yes, any law enforcement officer can request you surrender a pilot's license.

    Moving the sticks is the easy part of flying. Knowing all the Federal Aviation Regulations/requirements and other rules, well that's the hard part.
     
  9. CharlieAMA

    CharlieAMA TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    The Pantex Plant here in Amarillo is a no fly zone. It ain't no secret, but it is a no fly zone. I think Commercial flights have to avoid it also. Pantex was a ordnance palnt in WWII, and is now the final stop for all nuclear weapons assembly. My father in law retired from there, and my brother in law works there. Small planes have to detour around it. Iflew with a friend of ours one time to Denton, Texas, to pick up some dude for business. On the way back, we went around Pantex. I asked Dan, the pilot, what happens when you don't, and he said "you don't want to find out". I let it go at that.
     
  10. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    "............the case would be dismissed if he agreed he wouldn't take any legal action against Darlington county law enforcement."

    That pretty much says it all.
     
  11. shadow

    shadow Active Member

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    In years past there was no requirement that a person flying an airplane even HAVE a pilots liscense. The law may have changed. If it has I have no knowledge of it.
     
  12. R.Kipling

    R.Kipling Well-Known Member

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    Shadow,
    Can you be that old, or is it a recollection? The CAB was was authorized by the Air Act of 1926, and licensing soon followed. I wish I had payed better attention to my oldest business partner, RIP, he was very proud of the CAB ticket he held. I believe that it was a two digit number.

    Those were the days when ships were made of wood, and men were made of iron. Thx for invoking the memory.

    Kip
     
  13. Kevin Fleming

    Kevin Fleming Active Member

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    How quick some of you are to jump on the "he should know better" bandwagon. The fact is this pilot broke NO RULES, either that were published or temporary distribution to any FAA authorized entity.

    I read about this last week and man did it ever frost my you-know-what. This is simply one more incident in which some public safety/security agency has gone over the top.

    I am tired of "the government" limiting our "priveledge" to own guns and fly the airspace (and a host of other things).

    K
     
  14. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    If you woke up this morning, there is a 90% chance you broke some law.
     
  15. shadow

    shadow Active Member

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    R. Kipling-----NO ! I am not quite that old. However when I took flight training in the late 70's that was the case. No liscense was REQUIRED---IF--you owned your own airplane. Of course, there was a liscense requirement if you wanted it insured, or rented an aircraft, carried passengers. Most folks were not aware of the situation and just went on to flight school thinking it was a requirement.
     
  16. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    shadow, didn't know that. I got my "ticket" in the mid to late 70s, and I just assumed you had to have a license. Never really checked it out. I guess we assumed that government requires a license to even f**t so we don't question it. Shame on us.

    KY and Barkley dam still have lodges that serve $50 hamburgers? I'm guessing they would be $150 hamburgers now? LOL

    I miss flying, not the regs though. I fly commercial every once in a while and still can't figure people out whom request an isle seat. Me? I've got my face pressed against a window an am counting section lines, which you can do most times West of the Mississippi.

    Who would have ever thought flying would be cheaper than trapshooting? LOL

    I actually made money flying. Shooting? Just enough to lure me in the first year or so. LOL
     
  17. shadow

    shadow Active Member

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    Bisi---Hamburgers at those places are not the best around and are overpriced for sure. I live on barkley lake --just a couple miles from Barkley Lodge. Food there is not nearly as good as it used to be a few years ago. Us locals rarely go out there to eat.

    Fishing is as good as ever--maybe better, and this is a wonderful place to call home. Just wish we had more trap ranges close by. I would probably still be shooting if I didnt have to drive 50 miles one way.
     
  18. fly

    fly Active Member

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    a cop cannot have a pilot surrender his license.
     
  19. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    I agree. Only the FAA agent can do that.
     
  20. R.Kipling

    R.Kipling Well-Known Member

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    Shadow,

    My first aviation mentor used to say, "that license is only a piece of paper, they can't take away my knowledge and ability - I will always fly." He also was the first to tell my that an instrument ticket was also made out of paper and could not scrape the ice off your wings, when you needed it most.

    I started flying in '60 and was a CFI in '64 when I went into the service. I don't remember the situation you describe, even back then. 5 years ago I purged a stack of FAR/AIM manuals that went back to '62, or I'd be able to retrieve that information. It's of no matter now, just a passing curiosity to me. There were a number of old geezers around the T-hangers, that were Sunday flyers. I know they didn't have current medicals, and some most likely never got that check-ride.

    Also, I believe that the LEO comment made earlier may have misused the word "surrender". In every state that I've lived in, the State Police have the co-responsibility of investigating aircraft accidents and incidents. And, from personal experience, you can get to meet those wonderful LEO's when you choose to land in the wrong parking lot for lunch.

    After I finally retired I looked forward to those $100 weekend hamburgers. Those places are now fewer and farther between. Aviation is another one of those hard earned freedoms that have been taken away by the greed and jealousy that permeates our society today.

    Two of my children have earned their wings, one still flys for Continental. My youngest daughter was a dual rated Commercial pilot, pride and joy. Now, my youngest Gkid is following the family flying tradition, safely overflying a nuke plant while heading to the practice area on nearly every flight.

    I try to never miss a bull session about flying or shooting.

    Kip
     
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