1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Any of you guys use one of the 110V wire welders?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by jbbor, Apr 8, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jbbor

    jbbor Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,034
    I have a Lincoln 110 volt flux core. It works perfectly on light steel up to about 1/8". Jimmy Borum
     
  2. KENENT1

    KENENT1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,393
    Location:
    Beloit, WI
    watch the duty cycle, some of them are only around 10%, they get hot and have to cool down before they will produce a decent weld.



    tony
     
  3. DKP

    DKP TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    28
    I use the hobart 110v flux core on small stuff. The problem with these small welders as stated above is the 10% duty cycle. I use mine on light steel and aluminum with argon gas on the aluminum.
     
  4. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    3,825
    Location:
    Terre Haute Indiana
    I have a Lincoln 100 amp 110 volt with gas (MIG). It will weld up to 1/8". It will weld 24 gage too. I used it when I made Skeels Wheels clays carts and I never had a problem with the duty cycle. Most of my welds were on 1/8" stock and only 1/2" to 3/4" long. I could weld for hours without any problem. I would guess I was at 30% duty cycle. Great little welder. I believe the model they sell today is a 120 amp unit.

    Jim Skeel
     
  5. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,003
    Have you looked into the Inverter DC stick welders? I have an ESAB that uses 110, or 220 and can weld 1/8" 7018 all day. Its only 14 lbs. Miller and Lincoln also make them. Wayne


    [​IMG]
     
  6. bigbore613

    bigbore613 TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    4,755
    I have an old Miller sidekick, 25 years. Gas is great for some uses. If I had to replace ti the first peramiter would be that the wire only be hot when the trigger is pulled . Jeff
     
  7. moserag

    moserag Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2010
    Messages:
    96
    Location:
    Wyoming
    I currently work on welders for a living. My advice is if you get a 110v welder, don't use anything but flux-cored wire, solid takes more heat. Also, you will run up against your duty cycle with a 110v, I'll almost guarantee it. It's pretty obvious I favor a 220v. I would also recommend a welder w/ at least 200a output and using 75% argon/25% CO2 gas. As far as an inverter stick welder is concerned, they have very nice arc chatacteristics. They are also expensive, especially for someone not using them every day. Dave Moser
     
  8. birdtracker

    birdtracker Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,203
    I use a 110 Lincoln with 75/25 gas. I don't like the flux core. I weld sheetmetal with mine. When I weld truck frames its the old stick welder and 7018 rod. Roll cages are tig. It just depends on what you are welding and what kind of stress it will be put thru. Birdtracker
     
  9. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,714
    Mine is a Cambell Hausfeld. Says 85, I guess Amp. It delivers DC, do all the flux core welders do that? It is shockingly powerful. It's a world different than stick welding. One thing I found that helps is wearing reading glasses while I weld. If I can see the seam I can lay down a pretty decent bead but it's often difficult for me to see the seam. Funny, I never had that problem when I was 20 and using a stick welder.
     
  10. turbobike

    turbobike Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2007
    Messages:
    99
    Please Please don't get a Flux core. Spend the extra $$ and splurg on a Gas 110V Like the Lincoln 135, flux core will just piss you off in the end. The sheilded gas is much more professional..this is 2010 not 1969!
     
  11. Mapper

    Mapper Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2008
    Messages:
    684
    Location:
    SW Michigan
    I also have a Lincoln, 110V. I use gas with it. Nice welds. I have mostly used it on auto body panels. Apparently it takes me enough time getting scrouched around that the duty cycle has not been a problem. On the vision thing, I got some magnification lenses for the inside of my helmet. Most welding shops have them for us old pfarts.
     
  12. J.Woolsey

    J.Woolsey Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    930
    Been doing it for over 40 yrs, listen to them on the 220V and gas shielding.
     
  13. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,399
    Nice thread, I was thinking about posting and asking the same question.

    I have a stick welder now, but have been thinking about going the wire welder route.

    Like wireguy, my biggest problem anymore is seeing, and striking the arc. I only weld about once a year anymore, not very good anymore and thought the wire welder would make it easier.

    Has anybody tried one of the those full face "instant dark" helmets? And if they do work can you recommend a brand? Been leary of trying one of the "Harbor Freight" - $19.95 cheapies.
     
  14. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,012
    Location:
    S-E PA
    John,

    I was in the welding supply business for several years.

    You need to ask yourself a few questions about wire feed machines.

    WHERE will you use this unit?? If it is to stay in one place a 220V may be the way to go, but the 110V has a portability you cannot match.

    Everyone has a 110V outlet, few have 220V outlets - so if you are going to help a friend out the 110V might be the way to go.

    Good 110V units can weld about 3/16" metal (you can push to 1/4", but it won't be pretty).

    Keep an eye on the duty cycle of the machines versus the Amp output - Hobart units tend to have higher percent duty cycles with decent Amperage. With this in mind they tend to weld 'longer' before cutting out, and will tend to handle thicker metal.

    GAS vs FLUX CORE

    Spend the money for the gas shield (gun liner, tips, regulator, hose, AR/CO2 bottle). For most things this will give better quality and faster working times.

    Yes, there are times where flux core is fine (Helped a friend weld the top of a gate once - 20 feet in the air. We had the welder hanging from a rope, the friend was on top of the ladder welding on a windy day. Gas shield was NOT the answer that day...). Flux core will be more like stick welding (e.g., need to knock off the slag).

    You'll need a different liner and tips to switch between the two.

    My experience is that stick welders are fine for HEAVY metal. The MIG welders tend to be used for 'finer' work, and hence for most of us the 110V will work fine. You always have the stick welder for 'back up' and the 110V unit gives you portability.

    I now have a Hobart Handler (110V ~ 140 Amp) - with gas shield, and a Hobart Rod Runner (220 Amp gas powered DC stick welder). Between these two I can do anything I want with welding. Both are portable enough that I can take them anywhere.

    my $0.02 worth...

    David D
     
  15. moserag

    moserag Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2010
    Messages:
    96
    Location:
    Wyoming
    Gas is available in cylinders with a volume of 20 cubic feet up to over 200. I would only be guessing as to the cost in your area. Typlically you buy or lease a cylinder, then simply trade an empty for a full when you need to.

    Bisi, I love my auto-darken hood. Solar powered lenses are available to replace the regular lens in the helmet you already have. Just be aware that not all are suitable for outdoor use. Some will fog up in the cold, so read the fine print on the label. I seem to get about 2 years out of one of them.

    Dave Moser
     
  16. andybull

    andybull Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    South Carolina
    220 Volt, shielding gas and a Miller Auto Darkening helmet. The 120 volt is like comparing spray painting with a spray can VS a compressor and spray gun.
     
  17. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,753
    I have a small Hobart Handler 110v, 90amp at 30% duty rating. Amps take a jump at 20% and 10%. Pay attention to the duty rating, they play games with that to fool you. It is an older model and the newer ones aren't rated that heavy. It will weld anything I will likely need it for. 220v would be better but not very portable. I was told not to get the flux core wire so I have never used it. I use co2, it is cheap.I bought a tank so I don't pay rent on the tank. Tank is traded when empty.
     
  18. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2009
    Messages:
    913
    Location:
    Ojai CA
    It depends on what you're going to use it for most. I have a Miller 130 with gas, it will weld up to 3/16 pretty well, but beyond that penetration is an issue. If this is all the bigger type of stuff you will weld then that's all you need, and the Miller, Lincoln, Hobart, are all good machines. ESAB is very good too, and is the old Linde company, after Union Carbide got gutted after kiiling a bunch of people in India.

    I have done beads on gas tank skid plates on my Jeep that were 24" long in one bead/continuous pass, with the machine maxed out. I have ran this machine off a 16 ga 50ft extension cord for its entire life and never does the cord even get warm. For sheet metal and plate up to 3/16 it works well.

    If you want to weld bigger stuff thicker than 1/4" and do it often, then you need a 220 machine. But If you are only going to weld once a year, I would recommend getting someone else to do it for you, instead of buying a machine you'll never get good enough with to trust your own work.

    Randy
     
  19. TinMan88

    TinMan88 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2007
    Messages:
    979
    If you have the 220 outlet and you don't need to move it around to another plug-in, the Miller 175 machine is waaay smoother welding and has the capacity to penetrate. the 110v machines I use won't penetrate 1/8 steel and the work has to be turned over to back up the seam. If it runs .023 wire it just doesn't have the muscle for anything more than autobody. Gas is the way to go IF you only use it inside in a draft/wind free environment. Puff of wind and you get porosity (pocks and voids) in the weld. The flux core scales easily and for general ironwork is worth consideration. Flux is the ONLY choice for outside work. The welding shops in your area would likely demo any machine you would buy and show you the basics of how to use it. I own a 220 amp machine on wheels. It is too much for what I use it for. I run a Miller 175 at work and it is a sweetheart. Very smooth to use and flexible in regards to use. Some may disagree with me about how capable a 110 rig is but 1/8" is the limit unless you preheat the perent metal with oxy/acy to tease it into melding a puddle. The 220 volt machine is THE choice for an in-the-shop welder. TM
     
  20. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,302
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    I don't care for the 110v machines, unless that's all you have for power. Bought a Millermatic 180 Auto-Set and never looked back. The Miller has metal drive parts, unlike plastic used in rival machines. For thick metal I use flux core, but for gauge metal I switch for solid core and gas. You can weld thinner metal without globbing on the bead or blowing through the metal.

    Miller also makes a dual voltage unit that'snot all that much more than the 180. It's the 211 and it will run on 110 or 220. If it had been available when I was in the market, I would have bought it instead.

    These wire welders have a fairly low duty cycle. 20% to 30% is common. A 30% duty cycle means you can weld for 3 minutes out of 10, letting the machine cool for 7 minutes.

    For really heavy welding, I have a ginormous Airco stick welder that will put out 275 amps at 100% duty cycle. It's a production machine, but it's very easy to blow through 1/8" plate. It will vaporize small diameter welding rod. Just can't turn the amerage down enough. But holy cow it will sure do heavy welds. Saves wear and tear on the Miller.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

mig welder gas trap

,

miller sidekick 140 need regulator

,

what would make a lincoln 110v welder go hot and cold