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Any info on the infrared space heaters?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by wpairishshot, Jan 16, 2012.

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  1. wpairishshot

    wpairishshot Member

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    Just wondered if anyone here uses any of the infrared space heaters and which brand? I have seen the ads for Edenpure and several others, Edenpure looks overrated. Of course thats just my opinion. If anyone can offer any information on any other type as well, please do. I am not too fond however of having any open flames anywhere in my house though.

    Thank you!
     
  2. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    They are just a variation on an electric resistance heater. Output is going to be measured in Watts or BTU's (1000 W ~ 3400 BTU), and this relates directly to the amount of electricity used to run the thing.

    Thus, they are relatively expensive to run (typically electricity costs more than gas, oil, etc. per BTU).

    They can be good to heat a specific area when needed (think reloading room in a basement) or as a 'fill' heater in an area that does not heat as well as the rest of the house (like a family room that is colder than the kitchen).

    Most electric heaters will have three settings (something like 500 Watts, 1000 W, 1500W) - A 15 Amp socket will handle a 1500 W load and hence the sizing. Other items on the same circuit at the same time could make the breaker blow.

    What is your goal with this heater?? There may be better alternatives...
     
  3. ntgr8

    ntgr8 Member

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    Just remember that a watt is a watt. 1 watt of electricity will produce 3.?(don't remember exactly) maybe 3.7 btu's of heat. A 1500 watt heater will produce 3.7 x 1500 btu's the rest is all marketing.
     
  4. ntgr8

    ntgr8 Member

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    Cost to operate? Your Electric bill shows what you pay per kwh, should be around .08 per kwh. At a .08 rate a 1500 watt heater will cost .12 per hour, not much. Run it 4 hrs a day it comes up to $14.00 a month, maybe cheap, maybe not.
     
  5. lboh

    lboh Member

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    I recently bought 2 Solar Comfort models.

    I live in a "cold" climate in the mountains at 3,500 ft. Traditional heat source has been propane in a 4,000 sq ft house. Furnace used in finished basement and main level, with a heat pump on 3rd floor (code issue). I was using about 1,200 gallons per year for heat, cooking, and tankless water heater.

    With propane here at $2.95 per gallon I talked to some folks with these heaters and they were impressed so I bought them to try and put one on each floor where the furnace serviced

    My observations in the last couple months. Cost is about ~$50 per month per unit to run. On colder days (<30*) the furnace kicks on occasionally. I have a 500 gallon tank that was filled up in early December and have used about 70 gallons in the last 6 weeks. This would normally be about 250 gallons this time of year. Keep in mind this also includes hot water and cooking.

    The two I bought actually have 4 flood lights in essence with a fan to move the heat. So my power for these is basically running 8 flood lights.

    So my experience so far is that they are paying off. At $325 each I figure I will break even by spring and cut my propane cost dramatically.

    Happy with mine after being a skeptic for a long time.
     
  6. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    some infra red heaters are propane powered, like you see on the patios of restaurants. there's a flame, but it's unexposed and six feet off the ground. anyway, some electric infra red heaters are just a glowing, red hot, coiled wire inside a big, reflective dish. and some are a couple of quartz rods with a reflector behind. the quartz heaters are touted as being more efficient. what's cool about infra red heat is that it will warm you with invisible wavelengths of heat energy even if your outdoors and it's -20 degrees: it doesn't try to heat the air, it simply heats the objects it's pointed towards
     
  7. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    As stated before, there are 3.41 BTU's per watt, doesn't make any difference where it comes from

    But if your electric rate is $.10 per KWH, and you are on propane it cheaper to heat with electric if the propane is over $2 per gallon, if you are using an 80% efficiency furnace

    A 96+ furnace will be a little cheaper, if it is running right and you are getting the 96+ efficiency out of it
     
  8. Bill T

    Bill T Active Member

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    I just purchased an oil filled electric radiator model a couple of weeks back, and it really works well. It only cost $38.00 from Home Depot. It has 3 settings "Low Medium High" which are 500, 900, 1,500 watts. It also has a thermostat to regulate the temperature. It takes about a half hour to heat up, but it keeps our whole master bedroom nice and comfortable all night without running the furnace. It has casters so you can move it anywhere. For the price I don't see how you can beat it.
     
  9. John Galt

    John Galt TS Member

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    Some people just can't grasp the fact that all types of electric heaters are equally inefficient: a watt is a watt. It can be filled with oil, it can be filled with gold, it can be filled with crap; doesn't matter. Ditto for infarer, quartz, ceramic, etc. etc etc. On a BTU basis all electric heat is expensive.
     
  10. quartering

    quartering Active Member

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    so, you heat with wood or coal?
     
  11. 4EVRYOUNG

    4EVRYOUNG Member

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    I have a sunHeat that I use to keep the living room in the basement warm when the rest of the house is 68 the basement is 65 so with the zone heat that room is near 70 and compy. I feel cheaper then Heating the entire house to 72.

    I do remember when I got it the instructions said not for use in concrete rooms with out insulation.
     
  12. Doug Brown

    Doug Brown Well-Known Member

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    I bought one for $99 at Menards. It is 1.5kw, my furnace is 15kw. The furnace doesn't run- don't tell me I not saving money!
     
  13. Ken Mills

    Ken Mills Member

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    I have purchased two comfort air electric heaters\ original to the edenpure and leave the thermostat set at 69 degress one in my basement and One upstairs. My bill has been $20 dollars more per month since using the heaters and I used to heat with Natural gas and that would run me $115 dollars a month in the winter months. I have saved considerable and so has my father who led me onto the heaters. My home is 1200 sq ft per floor and very well built and insulated. In leave my gas furnace set at 50 degrees and it hasn't come on once this winter. I live in northeastern ohio and have nothing bad to say about these heaters. I have several other friends who have done the same and love the results. However I beleive alot of it depends upon the layout of your home to whether or not it will work well for you. I thinks they would struggle to heat a large open great room or drafty home.
     
  14. John Galt

    John Galt TS Member

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    The above is a fuel cost comparison calculator. Facts trup BS every time.
     
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