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Any diabetic shooters here?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by bobdog, Sep 20, 2010.

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  1. bobdog

    bobdog Active Member

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    How many of you guys are diabetic? I would guess a fair number of us are, considering our age and our sleek, athletic physiques.

    Question is this: Have you noticed any correlation between your blood sugar levels and your shooting performance?

    The reason I ask is I forgot to take my meds yesterday morning and I was half an hour away from home before I remembered. So I stayed away from anything sweet all day and ate a light lunch (if you can call a Polish lunch). I did OK with singles, but by the time I got to caps, I was more tired than I normally am at 3PM and felt a little fuzzy. I shot my lowest handicap score ever - a 63, way below my 87 average. Like anybody else, I have good days and bad days, but never this bad. I couldn't hit squat. I couldn't even run a post. Frank Bentley the Elder was also having trouble yesterday, and we got talking about blood sugar.

    I checked mine when I got home, and I was way low, and probably an hour or two from being in real trouble. Frankly, I'm glad I skipped doubles and got home OK.

    Was it just my day to shoot crappy handicap, or is there some correlation there? My guess is that there is. Maybe I just need to come up with a better excuse, but when I was first diagnosed about three years ago, and before I knew I was diabetic, I ate two chocolate covered donuts on the way to a shoot, and was so dizzy and disoriented by the time I got there I had to withdraw from the match. I got my first insulin shot the next morning in the doc's office.

    I've noticed big swings in my shooting performance, especially in caps, which tend to shoot in the afternoon. One day I'll shoot a 95 and the next day I'll shoot in the low 80's. I never have been able to explain it.

    Anybody else been through this?
     
  2. RFGA2

    RFGA2 Member

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    i was diagnosed diabetic in 2002. I was on medication only until 1.5 years ago when I was put on insulin. I find that blood sugar is fairly well controlled with meds and now very small doses of insulin. What really effects me seems to be the heat.

    I shot at the NC State Shoot this summer and shot 96 in the singles after not shooting since last year's Grand. i shot the next days singles on a later squad and it was well over 100F.. I find that my vision really gets blurry and all targets seem like blurs or streaks. i took my sugar before i shot and it was 118. By the end of the 100 targets it had dropped to 86. i was extremely fatigued as well.

    i feel that the diabetes does effect my performance.

    BG
     
  3. Pride Engineer

    Pride Engineer Member

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    I've had type 2 now for 16 years. I find that I shoot better when I'm a bit high on sugar, say 150-160. If I drop below 100, I don't shoot so well. Also, it seems that I am more sensitive to hydration. I get de-hydrated much easier. I try to drink lot's of water and I always carry some candy in my shooting bag in case I feel low.

    Mark Zauhar
     
  4. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Ditto what Mark said. Heart races, legs get weak, hands shake, light headed. Low sugar is a Bitch. Had it for 20 years. Bulge
     
  5. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    What Mark said
     
  6. Kemper

    Kemper Active Member

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    I have type II for 30 years, I shoot good like Mark around 150. I can't do anything including get back to my motorhome when it's 50.

    barry kemmper
     
  7. Barkingspider21

    Barkingspider21 Member

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    I'm 71, have been type II forabout 9 years, take my meds as prescribed but when I shoot trap I will drink about 4-6 0zs of orange juice 30 minutes prior, last week I broke 98 in singles with 3 straights and 93 from the 20 yard in handicaps, first time I shot registered targets, I have only been shooting trap for 23 months.
    Woody Sullivan
     
  8. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    Yep, 42 years of type1 brittle diabetes. It effects my eyesight, balance, stamina and clarity of mind when out of balance...up or down (clarity of mind part has never been in balance for me). During a normal day I stick my finger on average 6 times per day. At a trapshoot, especially when it is hot, I'm checking with a stick at least 10 times per day. That's the only way to keep it inline for me as the normal diet/control route has never worked for me. My average stays around 125. The only way you'll get it together is by sticking all day long. After some time, that exercise will tell you what condition your condition is in, considering food and insulin intake, excercise, etc. Check it all day long until you know your condition...period!

    Good luck...YOU CAN DO IT.

    GOOD SHOOTIN' WOODY!

    uncle milty
     
  9. wrbabb

    wrbabb TS Member

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    I elected to take insulin for control of Type II diabetes. I had low blood sugar during a Continental league one time. Beside physical symptoms I loose ability to concentrate. Had some candy bars but the sugar didn't kick in in time. The score was a disaster.

    I will check blood sugar in the morning. If it is normal I will skip morning insulin and take it when I get back. If high I will take insulin but also make sure I have some sugar before shooting.

    I think we can perform as well if we are managing our condition. However, if like me one is in their 50's/60's age does affect performance.

    Walt
     
  10. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    The problem is it going up and down all the time so for me I can have the whole range of symptoms during the day. I have a friend that lost a bunch of weight and quit drinking even diet soda and now he's ok even off the meds. The sugar is no fun.
     
  11. Ed Y

    Ed Y TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I've been insulin dependent since 1975. Totaled 3 trucks as a result of low sugar levels, lower than 27. I think that I shoot the best at about 100 but have broken 100s at over 250 but never over 300 that I recall.

    Ed Yanchok
     
  12. bkt514

    bkt514 Active Member

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    Bob, I have been diabetic for 11 years, and Trap shooting the last four. I truly shoot a bit better when I have a bit of hunger in my stomach. I try hard to stay well hydrated, and consume small portions of food thoughout the day. Never personally have had the issue of very low sugars while shooting. Also if sugars are on the high end of things my eyes don't focus quite so well.
    For me, my medications (no insulin)keep me about 130 to 145, no perfect, but not all that bad! Good Shooting.......bruce
     
  13. Force Break

    Force Break TS Member

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    Before I was diagnosed and being treated I went through a two years of highs and lows in scores and I didn't have an answer of what was happening. I knew I didn't feel like shooting some days and ususally shot poorly, I just thought I was getting older and didn't have the drive to shoot that I had for the past 40 year. Treatment, weight loss, and watching what I eat has gotten me back most of the way from a two year slump. This is all after three months of treatment for type 2 with metformin. It can only go better from here on out.
    I will have to keep track of my shooting in relation to my blood sugar after reading this post.
     
  14. Andy44

    Andy44 Active Member

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    Haven't shot at any diabetics lately...... :)

    But I have noticed some focusing issues when my B/S is off from "normal".
     
  15. Gross Man

    Gross Man Member

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    I am type 2 and stay fairly regulated with oral meds, diet and exercise. I find that I need to eat and keep my sugar up a little to shoot well. You type ones out there, have you tried an insulin pump? My brother swears by it. He hunts, fishes, shoots, and does remote hunting trips and has no problems. The pump keeps him regulated. BTW, there is new technology out there that couples the pump with a sensor that measures your sugar level continuously and applies the correct amount on insulin. Has anybody tried that? It sounds like a great concept. Billy
     
  16. perga1

    perga1 Active Member

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    What Mark said!
     
  17. WilliamMR

    WilliamMR Active Member

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    I shot on that handicap squad with you. After your first two rounds, I was watching you shoot as I was on post one. You seemed to be doing everything right, but the targets weren't breaking. You shot your average in the singles, so I didn't think it was because it was your first time shooting with us with a new background.

    I would have to agree that the diabetes may be the cause. It really sneaks up on you and you don't notice it or think about it. I'm a type II diabetic also. Matter of fact, you'd be surprised how many of our shooters are. But in my case, when I get to shoot the last event, usually doubles, I do feel the strain of the shoot, and the long day, does have an affect on me. I suspect my sugar level drops about that time, but I usually carry a granola bar or something to perk me up.

    This year at our State shoot, I shot every doubles event like I wasn't seeing the target, about 15-20 targets below my normal scores. When I got back, I was a little leery shooting doubles, but I was shooting normal again. Not the greatest, but a lot better than my 60's scores.

    Hopefully your next shooting experience with us will be a lot better.

    Bill Radwan
     
  18. straightshooter1

    straightshooter1 Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    I'm a diabetic and take insulin.

    I find that I need to take the glucose tablets with me to the line, at least in the mornings. If I feel a hint of my sugar dropping, I pop two in my mouth between posts or between traps.

    Shooters that don't know me probably think I'm having a snack.

    The thread about a group diet inspired me and I have lost 56 pounds since mid-March, so I have to make sure I don't take too much insulin.

    But, no matter how much I take, I still don't shoot like Mark.

    Bob
     
  19. bobdog

    bobdog Active Member

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    A lot of good comments here. Thanks. Doesn't look like it's my imagination. Funny thing is, when I was talking with Frank Bentley about his blood sugar, it never dawned on my that mine might be messed up too. I should listen to my own damn advice. Mine was 82 by the time I got home, so Mark is probably right.

    I've wondered why my shooting is so up and down for the last couple of years. I usually do OK in singles (didn't on Sunday, but didn't embarrass myself). I've noticed with 200 bird events I almost always do much better on the first half than the second. It's happened often enough that I think it's a pattern.

    Handicap is almost always mid-afternoon, and I've been pretty careful to avoid sugar when I shoot, but I've never taken my sugar during a match. I'm going to follow your advice and start keeping a log.

    I think I do shoot better when my sugar's a little high. It makes sense, I guess. Exercise lowers your blood sugar, and heat raises your metabolism and would have the same effect as exercise. That would explain why my shooting tends to deteriorate as the day goes on. I just assumed I was getting tired. I never really connected it to diabetes until yesterday. All I know is I wasted some shells on Sunday's handicap for nothing.

    And I agree with a couple of you about keeping hydrated. It helps my scores to lay off the coffee during the day and drink a bottle of water a half hour before I expect to shoot. (That took me five years to figure out, of course.)

    Bill, I'll see you October 3 if I can make it, and thanks. The trees didn't bother me; just like shooting sporties. Considering how many trees you've got there, the light was pretty good. All four of us had a good time, although I got beat by a kid who was shooting his first registered birds. He had shot a grand total of 50 handicap birds before Sunday, and he beat me. Gonna have to explain the rules to him. You don't beat the guy what taught ya.
     
  20. Janet

    Janet TS Member

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    My late partner was a diabetic and he had all kinds of trouble when I first
    met him. Finally by trial and error, we discovered if he drank a small bottle
    of orange juice before starting the third trap, he could keep his shooting
    average. This, of course, won't work if you have neglected yourself before the
    shoot begins. Hang in there and shoot well.

    Janet, CJ Enterprises
     
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