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Any Advice to Patterning a New Gun?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by chadmjkrause, Apr 7, 2011.

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  1. chadmjkrause

    chadmjkrause TS Member

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    Just purchased a new Joel Etchen 687 and I'm heading out to the club on Saturday to pattern it. The patterning board at the club is a grease board. Should I test with a certain choke or several different chokes? Any advice or tips that anyone can give? Is there a POI or a certain percentage of pellet spread I should be hoping for in order to optimize for trap?

    Chad
     
  2. chiefjon

    chiefjon Active Member

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    I am not a big patterning board fan. I would put an imp. mod. choke in the gun, have the trap set to throw straightaways and stand at post 3 and shoot the gun. Adjust the comb and butt plate, if possible, to your best fit, then watch your breaks. That will tell you if you are high, low or right on.


    JON
     
  3. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    Unless you are interested in determining the guns point of impact, there's little to be gained by shooting at a board to see how the pellets distribute themselves; it will never happen the same way twice.

    MK
     
  4. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    Yea... Don't shoot the pattern board and determine instantly where the gun is shooting.

    Do what a guy did last year at the gun club. He did just what the sages above mentioned. Screwed around all day with the fu%&*&g comb and then put all the adjustaments back to zero after three hours and 150 targets.

    That is when he shot the pattern board and found out that his factory browning XT combo was shooting three feet high and two feet to the left.

    It's true that your move to the target, lock time, shell speed and other factors will determine what impact you will need to get a centered/ sootball type break..

    That is done most easily with chiefjon's method.

    That is fine. Just do it after you determine that the gun you have shoots to a reasonable impact. An impact that can be adjusted with the comb/rib Etc.

    You can't adjust for three feet high and two feet left. It happens more often then the factory will admit.Jeff
     
  5. Bird Grinder

    Bird Grinder Member

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    I pattern every new gun I'm going to shoot for the POI. Just to make sure its shooting to the center and the right height. I shoot 5 shots on the same paper with the FULL choke. I shoot the same distance with every gun and the same shells I will be shooting. I then set the trap for straightaways and shoot from station 3. I adjust the gun to smoke the targets and drive the pieces down. I will then shoot 100 to 200 16's, then I'll shoot some handicap. After I feel the POI is right I pattern the gun again and I keep the target on file. I use the pattern targets Shotgun Sports sells. The next gun I buy I have a good idea of where to start.
     
  6. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Chad, go to the range as planned. A grease board if perfect for what you'll need to do. Set up on a bench somewhere between 15 and 20 yards from the grease plate. A couple of bean bags for rests will be helpful.

    The first thing you have to do is find out whether your gun shoots straigh, and whether all the choke tubes hit the same POI.

    Put any choke in one barrel. Then shoot for POI. Aim. Be deliberate. Look straight down the rib, center the beads on the center of the board and fire. Do this as many times as you have to so you can say with assurance this tube has this POI in that barrel. Record the results. Now replace that tube with another. Repeat for all tubes. Separate out the ones that hit the same POI within an inch. The rest are junk.

    Now take the tighest of the known good tubes and put it in the other barrel and shoot for POI. Did it have the same POI as when in the other barrel. If yes, good. If no, the barrels are not regulated properly, and you'll have to decide whether you can live with the discrepancy or not. It is not uncommon for the bottom barrel to shoot a little higher than the top. Beretta says they intentionally set their combos up that way. Now do the same for the unsingle barrel if you bought a combo. With my Gold E combo, I found that only two of the six provided tubes shot to the same place. A call to Briley for several of their tubes cured that problem.

    Once you have done this, you will know where the gun shoots, and you can begin to figure our where you shoot it. I stood up and mounted the gun just like I was on the line. Then I adjusted the comb so that I was hitting 2" high at 20 yards. Then I went to the range, locked the trap on straight aways and shot from post 3 until I had the POI about right. Shoot until you are smoking them, then make a small adjustment if you think necessary, and shoot some more. Then go to 1 and 5 to see if there are any other adjustments you need.

    Let's say you do all this, find you gun and some of the chokes shoot straight, and have it adjust to "shoot where you look". Now go back to the grease plate, put in your tightest good choke tube and shoot for POI. Then record how high it is. That way, if you fiddle with adjustments later, you can always go back to the plate and set it back to your original position.
     
  7. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    I am not real big on patterning a gun other than for point of impact as compared to point of aim ... Set the gun up on the grease sheet and go and try to break some targets with it, adjust off of where you are hitting the targets as per the way Phil Kiner suggests ...

    I recently bought a new gun, went to the grease sheet to find the POI as compared to the POA and I couldn't hit anything ... I think I hit 3 targets from the 27 yardline ... I figured it must be me so I tried another round with a couple of spacers under the comb, same results ... One of the guys standing there said to "put some spacers under that comb, your 3 foot under them" (Thanks John) ... I played with it until I had 9/16 in spacers under the comb and now I am right in the center of the targets from the 27 yardline ... I have not shot it at 16's as of yet but I will be interested to see how I do from there with this gun shooting that high when standing that close ...
    Back to the grease sheet and the gun is shooting 100-110 % high ... I tried one more spacer (1/16) trying to tweek it but I was taking the tops off of the targets so I removed that one spacer and now I need some heavy duty practice with it to get some confidence back ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  8. Fritzboy

    Fritzboy TS Member

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    Remember to put the small end of the shell in first.
     
  9. Hardage

    Hardage TS Member

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    The grease plate as said earlier is great for POI. Some great advice in a couple of the posts. Just remember to shoot from the distances you normally will be shooting targets from and with the shells and chokes you will be using as well. As said earlier as well, some OU's do not have good barrel convergance and some chokes will sling the POI off. Personally, I would rather have a colonoscopy than count pellets on a sheet of paper so I avoid both like the plague.
     
  10. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    It is much easier to read your POI from 13 yards. HMB
     
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