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Anticipating (bad habit) help

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by starship, Aug 9, 2007.

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  1. starship

    starship TS Member

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    Jul 18, 2007
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    Okay, I'm fairly new to this trap thing and having a great time....BUT
    I seem to be developing a bad habit of anticipating the clay. No doubt in my mind when it comes out it's going left....then it goes staight away (or close to it).

    Shoot a fair amount of sporting clays and thinking maybe this is where I'm getting the habit. Actually do know most of the time where it's coming from and where it's going.

    Realizing this is not the case with trap. Any suggestions or exercises for this problem, short of having someone stand behind me and whack me with a stick every time I do it?

    Thanks
    Chuck
     
  2. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    Practice with a friend doing the pulling without the microphone. Have the friend press the button at a random time interval after you mount your gun and you don't say a word just watch with your eyes and be READY.
     
  3. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Anticipation= attempting to beat the target. See the bird, them move the gun. Will work every time when you quit anticipating. Hap
     
  4. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    have some one pull for you and have them slow pull for you, worked good for me. Also I Practice once a week on something anything but stay on it. This works for me when I start to feel rushed. Mount and take your hold point look out over house, call pull then say out load. I SEE YOU. before moving the gun to the target. Sometimes when things are all out of whack I will low mount my gun seems to help me see a track target first then shoot.
     
  5. C H S

    C H S TS Member

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    Nora Ross helped break me of that by showing me a drill in which I called for the bird but wasn't allowed to go after it until someone standing me said "GO!". After a while, I came to realize that the bird could not outrun my gun and I calmed down and learned to call, lock on and follow before I chased. The calming down was the hard part.

    Andy
     
  6. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Hey, I like Nora's drill but I've always recommended just having a buddy pull for you but at your call and either give you a no-bird, a slow pull, or any other trick he wants. I'm not sure I like having the buddy pull without some sort of call from you - better that he just decides on his own to be on time, slow, or not send a bird at all. Trust me, you'll think you're taking a course in cake baking from Betty Crocker with all the barrel movement until you catch on....Bob Dodd
     
  7. mobear

    mobear Member

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    As you mount the gun just tell yourself mentaly "dont move till you see the bird" you may have to think this repeatedly until you get you mind trained.

    I was told this by Phil Kiner at one of his clinis, and have been doing it ever since.

    Dan
     
  8. stockguru

    stockguru TS Member

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    All of the above mentioned techniques are great and can help you achieve "patience". The most important thing as HAP MAC said is "see the bird".In conjunction with all of the above techinques, after you have mounted the gun and settled into your shooting routine, simply tell yourself "wait for the bird". Don't let yourself move until you actually see the movement of the bird from the trap house. Make that silent statement a part of your shooting routine, before each call for the target. Tim
     
  9. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    I've had the exact same problem, and what worked for me is to not look down the trap range until it is my turn to shoot. After I shoot I look at the ground until the shooter to my left has shot, then I wait another 2-3 seconds for the pieces to land, and only then do I mount my gun, look down range and call for my bird. I have no idea where the clay will go, so I am unable to anticipate it. Try it and good luck.

    Porcupine
     
  10. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Learn to read the trap. HMB
     
  11. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Repeat after me: "See the bird, shoot the bird." It is like a mantra and, it works. You may also want to always shoot a full choke so that you don't feel that the bird will get away from you.
     
  12. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    I've only been shooting competition for two years now so please take my commentary for what it's worth.

    When I first started watching others shoot I always looked at the breaks (or misses). Now when I watch, I concentrate on the muzzles of the shooter's barrel. It is amazing how many start their barrel one-way and end up moving it in another. It goes like this: Pull, initial move, oh sh_t!, jerk back to the target, lost. Many do pull it off... but it is ugly!

    The best shooters virtually never make this mistake. They make direct, smooth, slow, controlled moves to the target and stay in their gun after the break.

    I've found that forcing myself to wait before moving my barrel has paid huge dividends. Every time I remember to wait for the bird, AND keep my noggin firmly down on the gun well after the trigger is pulled, I shoot well.

    I had to learn that there's plenty of time to get to the target. The more targets I shoot the slower the targets seem to fly, and paradoxically I'm breaking them in a tighter zone even after the momentary hesitation to detect direction before beginning the move.

    Tell yourself before every target to keep a quiet gun as you pull--before long it will get better.

    Guy Babin
     
  13. ffwildcat

    ffwildcat TS Member

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    guy is right on.

    watching top shooters is about watching the shooter not the target breaks, hard to do but beneficial.

    a controlled move is essential to successfully breaking difficult target presentations. and it starts with a quiet gun. they never move it before the target releases.

    my son went through this drill with his shooting instructor. his instructor would hand pull the targets. if my son moved the gun at all before the bird was released his instructor would stop, point out to him what he did, make him go quiet and start over. he was cured within a few days. learning to see the target first before you move the gun is the most important thing you can learn in trapshooting IMO.
     
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