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Another Jack Gracey Instruction.

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by JACK, Mar 2, 2012.

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  1. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Read the first installment about a terrific trap instructor and all around wonderful person. Adn then I'll tell you more.

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    Jack Gracey was a terrific singles shooter. One of the best during his time. He did travel to Vandalia and other state shoots but not as much as other notables of the day. He shot during the era of Little, Hoppe, Bonillas and those...

    As an instructor he insisted that you "pay attention" and keep up with his pace. there would be no gimping and limping around the trap line when he stood behind you. He pushed the button on time except if your were cheating on the target path. It was an intense work out. When you saw him shoot (as all of us did), you could see that he practiced what he taught.

    I thought of this thread when I saw "The best tip you ever got". Adn this came back to me but thought it deserved its own time and space. That tip is:

    "The gun moves vertically the same distance every time".

    Jack shot a TM1. Ithaca as I recall. 60/40 likely, but I seem to remember that he traveled to Metro gun Club in Blaine MN one day and stuck it into that famous bbl bending tree that Neil now uses. Perhaps I'm stretching the story a bit... Regardless, I think his gun shot more to 70/30.

    Jack would give you a tireless 45 minute lesson. You were exhausted as he doubled your pace from station to station. Ever careful to care for the cord across the rock infield. He was set up and waiting for you to do whatever you needed to do so that you could concentrate. You shot singles his way. He made you set up properly, wait long enough before calling for the bird and insisted that you "keep the bbl into the bird". Only time you moved the gun after the shot was to follow a big piece. If you were "woofin-em-up" He encouraged yo to keep doing the same.

    Gracey was a wonderful target setter. You practiced on proper targets. And learned that your gun bbl wanted to move vertically the same distance on every shot. If you held a parallel gun, your movement might only be an inch, perhaps 2" once you saw the target become a target. If the birds were higher that day, you woudl hold a higher gun. The gun wants to go off after your programmed eye/muscle memory of 2". Especially true with release shooters. If you were a one-eyed shooter holding on the lip of the roof, the bbl traveled 6" and always went off when the 6" was reached.

    If you buy into this you now understand why you "short shoot" or "didn't get to the target" on some days when the targets are lower of higher than your eye/muscle memory. And too, If the days targets are perfect for you eye/muscle memory, every shot is easy and you "woof-em-up".

    Some days yo like the targets some days not. Now you may know why.
     
  2. morgan1

    morgan1 Member

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    I love it, This really rings true to me when I shoot at many different clubs you can really notice the adjustment that is sometimes required for eye/muscle memory. Different house looks and terrain all lead to adjusted eye muscle memory. Thanks Jack very interesting.
     
  3. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Member

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    I helped Jack bend his barrel on the his spare tire with two sand bags more times than I could count. Unless you kinked the rib it would always come back. He had John Barth choke all his guns. His single was 30 and his O/U was 10 and 17.

    I bought his O/U, a comp 1 for $1700. and won the doubles that week-end in a shoot out with Clyde Maxwell the old Remington rep. When I got home Jack had left a message that he had to have that gun back. Naturally I sold it to him.

    Rick
     
  4. Shooter R

    Shooter R Active Member

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    I was in a shoot off for the 1982 Wis. State Singles Championship with Jack Gracey. Four of us had tied with 199's. Larry Weiniger missed one in the first round. I missed one in the second round (for Class A Champ). Jack Gracey was our Champ that year with Ralph Sievert coming in second.

    I actually bought the TM-1 that I used from Jack when he worked at Boxhorns, probably around 1979 or so. I did "pretty good" with it, but couldn't figure out why I missed the occasional "gimme" target. After patterning my .042" TM-1 Jack said "that's too tight". John Barth opened my choke, with what everyone told me was a "1 minute job, with a $5 "brake hone". Reguardless, it worked well.

    Jack was unique. He loved life. He could be your friend, but he was definetly his own man. He knew what it took to be a winner, and did it. When he called for a bird, it was: YEAH! It's too bad he's still not here. Cancer is a bitch.
     
  5. coot shooter

    coot shooter Member

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    Jack,
    I have shot Jack's single, and would say that it shot considerably north of 70/30. I would go 80/20 if not 90/10. Maybe lower when it needed a "bend up":)

    Mike
     
  6. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    I thought he shot a model 12??? motordoc
     
  7. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Member

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    He shot 1100's when he made the first 2 all american teams.
    Rick
     
  8. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    I would bet that his hurry up technique was to stop you from thinking between shots. If you are jumping targets you are thinking. If you are hurried to the next post, to start shooting, you are reacting and not thinking. So he was teaching you not to think, without telling you to. So that you would not think about, not thinking. Make sense?
     
  9. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Jack Gracey saw the shot pod perfectly. as well as Neil's high speed camera. I can tell you that a 45 minute lesson with Gracey was a WORKOUT! Speaking to Stlflyn, he made you concentrate. He earned his money for sure. You got your money's worth for sure.
     
  10. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Jack told me that when he shot he played a mental game. He would say to himself, that someone would bet him $20.00 that he could not break the very next target. He said it helped him because he could not afford to lose $20.00.

    I sometimes wonder what if Jack have lived? What ever gun club in Wisconsin that he would have managed attendance would have increased and I do believe trapshooting as we currently know it in our area would have changed for the better.

    It was amazing the number of shooters that would come to his club just from Illinois alone. I know of someone who was his shooting buddy and the great stories he can tell of the people he met through Jack. He was one heck of a man.
    Steve Balistreri
     
  11. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Jack,

    That was my point. If you are thinking, you are not concentrating. By not giving you a chance to think, he was keeping you in the concentration mode. Jon
     
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