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Another eye exam question

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by ke4yyd, Mar 8, 2007.

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  1. ke4yyd

    ke4yyd Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    Messages:
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    The optometrist uses a wall chart at a distance of 20 ft to determine the distance correction needed. Is 20 ft really the same as infinity as far as distance vision is concerned. The last two times I had my eyes checked they were -1.50 in the right eye and -2.00 in the left eye. While this seems to work very well for 15 to 30 ft vision it sems blurry for long distance vision while driving, hunting, shoting etc.. I often dig out a pair of my older glasses with -2.00 in the right and -2.25 in the left eye and have sharper vision in the distance but not good at 15 to 30 ft range. Should I ask my optometrist consider my needs for shooting and adjust the prescription some what? I will be going in next month for my annual checkup.

    I have cataracts which restrict my corrected vision to 20/35 in both eyes. At what vision loss do they normally do cataract surgery??
     
  2. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
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    I read that stuff about 20 feet being just as reliable as long distance but it sure didn't work for me. I also have a cataract in my left eye but it is not ready for surgery yet. I spent over an hour in the chair with a local optometrist and my eye kept adapting to whatever lens he put in but my vision was blurred with his RX. I spent good money for new bifocals and was very disappointed. I finally had an exam with Dr. Laura Winkel at the Spokane Gun Club. She had her computerized automatic refractor and other high tech equipment but her final test was to have me read signs on the clubhouse wall about 75 feet away. She got the right RX for me in both eyes and I got my shooting glasses fixed and also took back the bifocals to the local optometrist who had to do them over using Dr. Laura's prescription.
     
  3. Mac V

    Mac V Guest

    Every eye doctor I've ever talked with (and that includes some very good ones) contends that a lens correction for 20 feet is good out to infinity. And every time I get a new lens prescription, we stick it into a "test" frame, grab a handful of single lenses from the exam room drawer and head outside so I can get a correction for real distance...1000 feet or more. I want to be able to see the individual branches on trees a quarter mile away, and by the time we're done, I have what I want.

    True, I have to sacrifice a little intermediate-distance (30-60 feet) clarity to get what I want but I have decided that it's worth it. I couldn't do this without the cooperation of an open-minded doctor, but I've proven to her that there is a difference between what she thinks I should have and what I really need, and she's willing to bend a good bit.

    Mike
     
  4. Tailbuster

    Tailbuster TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Messages:
    254
    We have a special name for the one more step in power that some people need from in the room to looking outside. We call it room allowance. In the exam room particularly if we use mirrors to get the 20 feet, some people will end up one step weaker than what they need for far away. As one poster said, the easy way to check is get the rx in a trial frame and hold a .25 step in front, while looking across the street. If it is INSTANTLY better it's probably good. If not INSTANTLY better leave it alone. Your Rx will end up too strong. Your doctor will do that for you if this happens to you.

    That said- be very, very, very, careful about trying to run the exam. Let the doc do his job, he does it all day everyday, your eyes are not that different from everybody else. Too much thinking on your part is only going to mess things up- guaranteed.

    all the best,
    john
     
  5. Mac V

    Mac V Guest

    <blockquote><I>"That said- be very, very, very, careful about trying to run the exam. Let the doc do his job, he does it all day everyday, your eyes are not that different from everybody else. Too much thinking on your part is only going to mess things up- guaranteed."</I></blockquote>

    You're exactly right about this part, John. My doctor does use the mirror equipment and she turns this part of the exam over to a very good optometrist with STRICT instructions that any change may not exceed specific parameters (usually a .50 step). But I'm very glad that she is willing to give me the chance to fine tune what she gives me to suit my specific needs.

    Mike
     
  6. 682LINY

    682LINY Member

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    Aug 14, 2006
    Messages:
    967
    I have used Captree optacial on long island new york,,,,he is a randolf dealer ,,,he is experinced with the needs of shooters,,,he has optamized my trap shooting Rx,,,it is slightly defferent than my regular Rx,,,but I sure can see the birds better
     
  7. 1881home

    1881home TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    154
    Sure hope that Doc Rively reads all of this.
     
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