1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

ANGUS BEEF

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by timberfaller, Aug 25, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. timberfaller

    timberfaller Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Messages:
    7,973
    Location:
    Eastern Washington
    Red, you won't.

    The only way is to go to the source. Dead cow meat is red, so the rest is in the packaging.

    there are truth in labeling laws but who said it is 100%.

    All beef is good if it has been "finished" out, I prefer grain feed on a grill!
     
  2. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    15,648
    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    It's easy........Angus Beef has a sticker on it.

    HM
     
  3. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,332
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    I don't know what the big deal is about Angus beef anyway. When I was a kid, all I remember seeing in Nebraska and Iowa were Herefords (and an occasional Charolais.)
     
  4. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,539
    Location:
    Oxford MA
    reddottm1 the above website may answer some of your questions. It is interesting to note the Angus is a breed of beef cattle. Which in my doesn't make it taste and different.

    Bob Lawless
     
  5. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,086
    Some people really like it. Myself, I'll take a Herford/Holstein cross any day of the week as long as it is corn fed at least 30 days before it is taken to the locker.

    I bought an Angus one time, and it was more of a fatty marbled meat which we didn't really care for. Once was enough for my family.

    But like I said, there are others who think it is the best.

    Just a difference in what people want in beef.

    Good Luck!

    Hauxfan!
     
  6. jjv1234

    jjv1234 Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    84
    The sticker on the label that claims Angus beef is not always Angus beef. The Angus industry has established the CAB (Certified Angus Beef) program through packers and the only qualification to sell cattle in this program is that they be black (which all Angus cattle are). Other breeds of cattle and crossbred cattle can also be black through cross breeding and could therefore be sold through the CAB program and labled as Angus without an ounce of Angus pedigree.

    Besides, it is a fallacy that Angus cattle are the best beef breed; they do have by far the largest number of cattle and have established the best marketing program by offering premiums for CAB certified cattle and making the requirements for the program so loose. Type of feed, finishing, and custom harvesting will almost always produce the best tasting beef no matter the breed.
     
  7. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,539
    Location:
    Oxford MA
    jjv1234 there are also Red Angus. There is a gentleman who is not to far from me that raises Red Angus.

    Bob Lawless
     
  8. DB3006

    DB3006 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    89
    jjv1234, you are incorrect that all Angus are black. There is also a Red Angus.
    DB3006
     
  9. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,969
    Most Canadian cattle are grain fed rather than corn fed because the frost free growing season for corn is not nearly as long as in the U.S. I like the taste of grain fed beef but my preference is deer meat that I have butchered myself, it has zero fat and zero chemicals.
     
  10. jjv1234

    jjv1234 Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    84
    Actually, I am correct. Red Angus is considered an entirely separate breed of cattle. Their bloodlines and pedigrees split a long time ago. Read about it here: http://redangus.org/association

    The point is that we could cross a Red Angus with a Black Angus, get a black calf and sell it in the CAB program. For that matter, we could cross a Maine Anjou (black) with a Gelbvieh (red) and get a black calf and also sell that in the CAB program. You go the supermarket meat counter and buy Angus tagged beef that might not have any Angus whatsoever.
     
  11. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,539
    Location:
    Oxford MA
    jjv1234

    "Actually, I am correct. Red Angus is considered an entirely separate breed of cattle."

    Well I will tell you when someone says Angus Beef and the hide isn't present to check the color. You are going to tell us that only Black Angus cattle are used as Angus. Especially after telling us.

    "Other breeds of cattle and crossbred cattle can also be black through cross breeding and could therefore be sold through the CAB program and labled as Angus without an ounce of Angus pedigree."

    You seem to be contradicting yourself now!!!!!!

    Bob Lawless
     
  12. RobertT

    RobertT Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Messages:
    1,355
    WHERE'S THE BEEF???

    Robert
     
  13. Milkbone

    Milkbone TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2009
    Messages:
    406
    The above URL gives specific about the CAB program. As you can see, it's far more involved than just black cattle.

    At one time, Hereford was the top breed in the country, but Angus took over a long time ago. Angus and Herford make a great cross (usually a Herford bull and Angus cow). The result is what's called a "black baldy" (black, but with a white face) which is in very high demand. Usually, black baldy calves sell at a premium to straight Angus or Herford. Crossbreeds are usually better than pure breds due to a factor called "hybrid vigor".
     
  14. jjv1234

    jjv1234 Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    84
    Bob -

    I see no contradiction. I stated that all ANGUS cattle are black (which they are, just as all Red Angus cattle are red). That does not mean that all black cattle are Angus.

    Genetics 101: Black is a dominant gene in cattle which means that if a calf is a carrier of a black gene then that gene is expressed in its appearance and the calf will be black. Red is recessive, which means that for the red color to be expressed in coat color, the calf needs to have both parents contribute a red gene and not a black gene from either.

    Angus cattle have been selected for centuries for the black gene which means that through time, the recessive red gene has been "bred out" of the breed. Red Angus cattle, of the same origin, were selected and kept "pure" by ensuring that no black cattle were crossed into the breed.

    Other breeds of cattle that are historically not black, such as Limousin, Gelbvieh, Charlois, etc. have large portions of the population that ARE black because in their bloodlines they were crossed with another breed of cattle that are black and the black gene had passed through generations and spread through the breed.

    Black cattle have been given preference by cattle feeders over the years because as they pass through salebarns as calves to be purchased and fed to market weight, a pen of black cattle APPEAR to be very uniform in kind as opposed to a pen of mixed color cattle. Uniformity of product is a goal of any industry and the cattle industry is no exception. The Angus breed association has capitalized on this preference by creating the Certified Angus Beef (CAB) program, which accepts all black cattle for slaughter and pays a premium, regardless of actual pedigree and labels them as Angus at meat counters even though there may be no Angus in the calf.

    Hopefully this clears things up.
     
  15. Old Texas Marine

    Old Texas Marine Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    529
    jjv1234 is exactly right. To make the "CAB", the animal only has to be black. I know that statement is in conflict with Facciola’s web page protestations, but my herd is mostly black Limouzin. The black Limos will bring more $ per lb. than the red Limos at the same sale. That is quite a testimonial to the Angus Marketing effectiveness.

    In the '50s the Angus purebred cattle had a better marbled beef than other breeds and that was highly desirable then. So the desirability of Angus became established as the best tasting, most tender beef due to this high fat content. Now, people want less fat in their beef, but the perception is still in the consumer's mind (thanks to the marketing) that Angus is the best.

    My partner and I fought it for a while. He was a Charolais fan and I preferred Brahmas but the market dictates what we raise now. No matter the breed or crossbreed, it has to be black because that is what the buyers will pay more for and our costs are the same irrespective of color.

    HBT
     
  16. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,539
    Location:
    Oxford MA
    jjv1234

    "The sticker on the label that claims Angus beef is not always Angus beef. The Angus industry has established the CAB (Certified Angus Beef) program through packers and the only qualification to sell cattle in this program is that they be black (which all Angus cattle are)."

    You are arguing apples and oranges. If you had made the statement that. All CAD Angus cattle are Black but you didn't say that you said a Angus are black yet there are Red Angus. Now I don't know about any one else but to me Angus is Angus. I don't care if they are green. What this all boils down to is a gimmick to sell more beef.

    Bob Lawless
     
  17. jjv1234

    jjv1234 Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    84
    Marine-

    There are no protestations on that site, we just have to remember that this is a marketing website and read between the lines. In order to qualify for CAB the cattle need to be "Angus-type". Not Angus, not pedigreed or registered, just "Angus-type". This means black colored. Period. That means any black calf can be sold in that program, not just Angus.

    One thing that I did not mention above that is on that site is that the CAB program does have quality standards that need to be met. Certified Angus Beef is a quality product, just do not be deceived that you are getting 100% Angus beef with every steak you buy.
     
  18. shrek

    shrek Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    897
    Speaking as someone who does a tremendous amount of work in the beef industry...

    As several have mentioned certified angus beef has a set of criteria that the animal and carcass must meet to be meet CAB specs and be labeled as such.

    Black hided while live and then minimum and maximum carcass grade specifications.

    The carcass specifications are what hedges the bet that the meat will provide a positive dining experience for the consumer.

    It demonstrates what a success the certified angus beef marketing program has been more than anything else, so good for them.

    Several other breeds of cattle can also meet those carcass specifications.

    In fact a few years ago a gene marking study was done on CAB carcasses, and they found that around half of them were not angus genetics.

    IT is safe to say that there are good eating and bad eating meat from all breeds and good management and care of the animals will have at least as impact on the end product as the critter itself if we start with a reasonable critter to start with.
     
  19. DB3006

    DB3006 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    89
    Angus cattle is a term that refers, in much of the world (though not in the United States), to either or both (collectively) of two types of naturally hornless (polled) cattle. Since the 1950s, these types have been regarded in the United States as separate breeds; they are:

    Black Angus, which refers to the original Scottish Aberdeen Angus' predominant coloration; these are usually referred to in the United States, where red coloration has been rigorously selected out, simply as Angus
    Red Angus, a breed resulting from the selection of red individuals from the Angus population, which has always had both red and black individuals.[1]
    Aberdeen Angus is the original name of the breed, which was developed in Scotland from aboriginal cattle native to the counties Aberdeenshire and Angus,[2] and the term is still in use in the United Kingdom, Europe, and other parts of the world, but no longer widely in the United States. The name derives from the location of origin.

    Angus cattle are naturally polled and solid black or red, although white may appear on the udder. Black Angus are the most popular beef breed of cattle in the United States with 324,266 animals registered in 2005
    DB3006
     
  20. Big Heap

    Big Heap TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,748
    My only experience with the bovine ilk has been cow tipping - however, whatever happened to the government inspectors who would roam the hanging carcases in the slaughter house and roll a grade marking on each side with their purple ink?

    Ruth's Chris always seems to have "Prime" beef on hand.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.