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Ammo, what happened ?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by mpenley, Mar 30, 2013.

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  1. mpenley

    mpenley TS Member

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    Stopped to buy .22's for plinkin'... stock clerk said has had no deliveries for 3 months and can't tell me why or when to expect some. No reason... just none available. What is going on? Everyone just scared of the feds?
     
  2. YOTESLAYER

    YOTESLAYER Member

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    This has been ongoing since Sandy Hook. I havnt seen a .22 shell on a shelf in two months, atleast. You cant buy 9mm or 40cal. shot, powder, primers and shotgun shells are no exception to all of this mess either.
     
  3. billyboy07208

    billyboy07208 Member

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    i heard "preppers"

    the mentality being for stockpiling is 10k minimum.
     
  4. oz

    oz Active Member

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    DHS is buying it. they are even buying 7.62x39... go figure.
     
  5. gordy h

    gordy h Member

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    Just came from a auction, Win. $100 a brick
     
  6. Francis Marion

    Francis Marion Well-Known Member

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    You can all thank the African commie for this mess.
     
  7. SKB-Eric

    SKB-Eric Member

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    Going price on Gunbroker right now is $80-$120 a brick, unless you buy a case, then it works out to about $70 a brick.

    Seems supplies of 5.56, 7.62x39, 7.62x51 and handgun ammo, are light but all are available from national dealers. But get ready to pay .60 a round for handgun and anywhere from .75 on 5.56 to 1.75 for 7.62x51

    BTW - preppers recommend minimum 100,000 22LR - as it will be used to barter for food in the coming times.

    What is funny to me is, the store shelves are loaded with 12 gauge right now. Guess the preppers all have MEC Jr's to take care of that need.
     
  8. johnboy

    johnboy Member

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    The best explanation I have heard to date was a lot of people are preparing for the invasion of the "Zombies".
     
  9. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    The small local one-man gun shop I patronize has a good inventory of most 22LR loads. CCI MiniMags are $8.95/100 and the only loading of that ammo he can't get is the 40-grain copper-plated solid. But he's been in business for 42 years and has accounts with a lot more distributors than many other shops.

    Don't forget that the big places like Bass Pro Shop and Cabela's are locked into where they buy their inventory by corporate edict. The hunting department manager at the Harrisburg, PA BPS is a friend of mine and has told me how that buying power can be a good thing but if the place he has to buy from doesn't have what he needs, he can't go elsewhere. Corporate even dictates what firearm calibers he is allowed to stock, which ones he can special-order for customers and which ones he is not allowed to sell at all.

    They had stainless steel Remington Model 700BDLs on sale for $529.95 five or six years ago and I wanted a new one in .25-06. He can't stock that caliber but it is one he can order. He has to order all his Remington products from a distributor in North (or South?) Carolina and if they don't have it, he can't get it.

    Ed
     
  10. RLC323

    RLC323 Member

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    I won't get into the whole mentality of the preppers. It is important to be prepared for disasters. But when your preparations become the most important thing in your life, you may want to re-focus on what your life really is.

    One thing that many of these preppers fail to consider is that .22 has the shortest shelf life of any ammunition due to moisture migration into the small cases. Even if stored properly in dry cool conditions .22 rounds will be the first ammo to go bad when compared to centerfire due to the priming mix and the powder being in contact with each other.

    If .22 ammo is stored improperly, like in a hot area such as a car glovebox, even if it is not directly exposed to water it can be rendered useless in just a few years.
     
  11. amboy49

    amboy49 Well-Known Member

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    RLC323

    Not to be argumentative, but I cannot support your contention that .22 long rifle rimfire ammunition is inherently subject to a short shelf life. I have a number of boxes of 50 count Winchester .22 long rifle cartridges in the "yellow" box. I think I can accurately state these shells were manufactured in the 1960's as I used to shoot them in a Remington Model 521-T on the rifle range of the gun club when my dad would go to shoot 10 bird races with his Model 12 16 ga. I was, as best as I can recall, about 10 years old and I am now eligible for Social Security. These shells are easily 50 years old. I don't like to shoot many of them, but I recently used these same cartridges to again shoot the 521-T ( Junior Special ) while out target practicing. They functioned flawlessly. The gun/cartridge combination is deadly accurate on head shots on squirrels out to 50 ft. with no hold over.

    I suppose there is the possiblity the newly manufactured .22 ammo of today is not of the same standard re: longevity - but I can't think of why the cartridges would have inferior bullett to case tolerance that would either permit or enhance firing malfunction(s).

    If .22 ammunition ever does become a barter commodity, I'll trade off the older stuff first. Those needing it that badly probably won't be too picky ! However, if our society reaches that state of affair, we'll probably all be shooting each other for the food stores. I predict reliance on a more battle tested calibre than the .22 will prevail.
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  12. cnsane

    cnsane Member

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    $h!+,,,,I mean, all that .22 ammo from the 70's that I've been shooting isn't really going bang when I pull the trigger.

    And when preparations to keep living comfortably, or at all, become the most important things in your life, you may want to re-focus on what your life really is---going to be compared with those who didn't prepare and are now looking for those who did.
     
  13. ysr_racer

    ysr_racer Active Member

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    You guys that are stock piling .22's are fools, .23's are the good stuff :)
     
  14. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    The wise man slowly builds his stock. Fools rush in.
     
  15. SKB-Eric

    SKB-Eric Member

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    Man, you guys are harsh - (and on Easter Sunday too)

    I get what RLC323 was saying. The 22LR is more sensitive to damage from storage. Not to say they will all expire like eggs on the shelf after X amount of days. In my hunting camper I had a box of Federal 550 count cheapies. After a couple of years of humidity, freezing, thawing, ect ... they started getting green spots on the case and the heads all started turning white and powdery. We shot them up to get rid of them and they all went "bang" but they were getting funky with time and the elements. Now contrast that with the Chinese 7.62x39 that was made in the 1960's and had copper coated cases and were lacquer dipped. They were sitting in that camper too and looked brand new. I even think that stuff could sit outside and still look like new. It was made to be stored in jungle holes for years without rotting.

    CMP was selling (long gone now) Remington 22LR that was sealed in foil crates for long term storage. If I was a prepper, that is what I would want.

    Eric
     
  16. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    I agree with Amboy, I have some real old .22LR ammo that wasn't stored in a very pristine environment and it all shoots perfectly

    It's just people buying it up faster than they can make it

    The day after the election I ordered 12,500 rnds of Fed 22LR's not knowing that they would be so hard to get, just replenishing for this year, and they were put on back order from Cabela's but I got them in about 3 weeks

    Glad I am a good little Boy Scout and is always prepared
     
  17. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    I still say it is cheaper to dig that bunker in the basement, or slab. Keep digging!!!!!
     
  18. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    You don't need to dig if you use your cases of ammo to create a "man cave" !
     
  19. Francis Marion

    Francis Marion Well-Known Member

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    Boy stifilin, you even spew your troll garbage on the front page.

    You and your ilk will be the first to try begging for provisions from the rest of us when SHTF.

    Hint: I won't have any provisions for you.
     
  20. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    The FEMA and local giverment will take care of them! It was cute seeing all those libs in the gas lines demanding fossil fuel. No food, no fuel, no heat, no brains...And they could actually see the storm coming right at them on radar, but still stuck their heads in the sand.
     
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