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Ammo & Heat ?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by philk, Jul 15, 2010.

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  1. philk

    philk Member

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    I`m guessing temps in semi trailers probably hit 140-150 during shippment so your probably ok.
     
  2. Rick in Ohio

    Rick in Ohio Member

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    Perazzi Nut
    Heat will not likely set your ammo off but heat will change your load presser less your using powder made for hot and cold weather.
    I am a long range rifle shooter along with doing the fun sport of trap shooting and heat will change things.
     
  3. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    I've got a picture somewhere of a .50 BMG target shooter that placed his rounds in the tailpipe of his idling pickup truck prior to going to the line since it was a bit chilly out that day. Some of the powders (VihtaVuori) are very temperature sensitive for match (1000 yd) use. It's in one of the issues of Very High Power Magazine.

    I guess anything's possible, but I wouldn't worry about cab temperature. I always make sure my black shootin' bag sits in the sun if at all possible. I'm also leery of shooting "refrigerated" (air-conditioned) shells. I'd be willing to bet that cold temperatures have caused more problems on the line than hot by a large margin. Good luck.
     
  4. GoldEx

    GoldEx Active Member

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    Perazzi Nut - No, 100 degrees is a non issue. Ask our boys in Iraq. Rick in Ohio is spot on about the pressures though. If you have worked up a load that is ok in the winter, be very careful in hot weather with it. This is especially true with rifle and pistol ammunition. I have had loads fired in single digit temperatures that were a dream to shoot and sub 1/2 m.o.a. groups that blew primers out in the summer and you couldn't cover the group with your hand. My general rule of thumb for shotshells is load for summer and use a hotter primer in the winter with the same load. Never a problem.

    Jeff
     
  5. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    You'd probably notice a cold weather issue sooner than an increase in pressure caused by higher temperatures, unless it is quite dramatic. I always load substantially lower than max pressures so there is a little headroom for error and other variables, like higher temperatures. A load developed to produce maximum chamber pressures at 70 degrees, would likely increase pressures when over 100 degrees. At 150 degrees, it could be rather excessive. It depends a lot on the powder and other components, and how they react to temperature increases. It would be an interesting experiment for someone with pressure testing equipment and some free time. I don't have the equipment and seldom the time, so I have to keep things on the conservative side and keep my fingers crossed. Factory loads would be hard to guess at, since they can vary, depending on the manufacturer. If your question relates to a specific brand and type of shell, it would be a good idea to contact the manufacturer and ask them. Unfortunately, it could vary from lot to lot. Same goes for the powder and component manufacturers.

    Good question! Sorry I don't have more of a concrete answer.
     
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