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Advice please

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Ga boy, Jan 12, 2009.

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  1. Ga boy

    Ga boy TS Member

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    Jan 11, 2009
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    Fairly new to sporting clay shooting. Looking at a Browning 525 sporting 20, used from Hero's Arms..want an O/U...$1895.00 used....I've read y'all aren't impressed with ported barrels, I like the screw in chokes, decent deal? other O/U's I should be looking at? thanks........Joel
     
  2. jm1079

    jm1079 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    I would try to shoot somebody's 525 and other guns to find out which would fit you best. Many of the sporting clays shooters will let you do this gladly. This matter of gun fit is most especially important for sporting clays. FWIW. JM
     
  3. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    There is nothing wrong with ported barrels. Keeping muzzle jump down for an easier move to the 2nd shot is the main reason. Recoil reduction is not enough IMO to be worth the cost.

    I would think a sportie gun would like ports better than a trap gun.

    HM
     
  4. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Jul 17, 2007
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    6,266
    If the gun you are looking at is like new then the price is on the high side of reasonable. But what it comes down to is if you like the gun more than the money in your pocket. The 525 is a very good quality gun that will last a long time. You will probably like the porting for the sporting game, many shooters do.

    Good luck and have a blast!
     
  5. puddin

    puddin TS Member

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    Dec 16, 2008
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    BEING NEW TO SHOOTING SPORTS LIKE YOU I'VE LEARNED A FEW THINGS. 1.GUN FIT, GUN FIT, GUN FIT 2.MONEY,MONEY,MONEY 3.ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL. 4.99.9% OF THE PEOPLE YOU WILL SHOOT WITH ARE GOOD PEOPLE. ASK TO SHOOT AS MANY DIFFERENT GUNS AS YOU CAN I'VE NEVER HAD ANYONE SAY NO.THERE'S NOTHING WORSE THEN BUYING A GUN BECUASE YOU THOUGHT IT THE RIGHT ONE AND IT WASN'T.I FOUND THAT OUT THE HARD WAY! GOOD LUCK IN FINDING THE RIGHT ONE BECUASE WHEN YOU DUST YOUR FIRST 25 OR 50 OR 100 YOU WONT BE ABLE SHOOT FOR AN HOUR BECUASE YOU CANT GET YOUR GUN TO YOUR FACE BECUASE YOUR SMILE IS SO DAMN BIG!!!
     
  6. WNCRob

    WNCRob Member

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    Apr 10, 2007
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    I wonder why the majority of top sporting clays shooters shoot Beretta 391's? At that level, I presume they can shoot anything they want, but the 391 is the single most popular gun...by a lot. As stated before, in the lower price range, the 1100 and 391's are the guns to consider, as not only starter guns, but "forever" guns. Also, I'd definitely buy a 12 gauge. IF you're getting a 20 gauge for recoil reasons, that's a fallacy in my experience...20's are often lighter and the recoil is not always reduced.

    WNCRob
     
  7. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    I would also agree that a 12 gauge would be the gun of choice. some of the sporting clays courses have targets that are a little long for a 20 and why give up the advantage. The price seems a little on thehigh side and I agreee that an autoloader might be the real answer except you can not save the shells for reloading. If that is the case you'll need an o/u. The browning is a good choice and most of them are about the same.
     
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