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Adapting to Eye Floaters

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by miketmx, Oct 24, 2011.

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  1. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I have visited an Opthalmologist twice and he confirmed that I have age related eye floaters in the vitreous fluid. I am not ready or willing to have vitrectomy surgery even if it was available. I hope that eventually the floaters will settle down somewhat and I am trying to find the best way to adapt to them for trap shooting. I have shot my best scores in bright sunshine while wearing Vermillion colored lenses against a green grass or green tree background. The floaters are the most bothersome against a sky background or looking at a computer screen. Has anyone found a lens color for a gray sky background that makes the floaters less annoying than Lite Orange or Clear lenses ?
     
  2. John Thompson

    John Thompson TS Member

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    After a couple of thousand real bad scores, I was lucky to have an eye doctor who also shoots. She said it was not bad enough for insurance but she would fudge the numbers a little. I had surgery for the floaters 3 weeks on 1 eye and 1 week on the other before the Grand. Missed 5 singles in 400, 4 27 yd. scores in the 90's and 2 90's in doubles. Have shot well ever since.
     
  3. Rebel Sympathy

    Rebel Sympathy Well-Known Member

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    While I cannot answer your question, I can make this observation....

    When floaters bother me the most is when I look at them. Then, my eyes are focused on watching the floaters. When I first got them, I watched them a lot and they really bothered me.

    However, when I forget about them and focus on an object in the distance, I don't notice the floaters. They go out of focus and pretty much disappear.

    Over time they are bothering me less. I suppose I have just learned to ignore them. If I leave them alone, they seem to leave me alone - at least most of the time. Not always, of course.

    Hope this helps.

    Mike
     
  4. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    Had my first one show up last Wednesday morning before Sunday's shoot. Fortunately it's a little off to the right of my focal point. Why the damn thing couldn't have shown up in my left eye, I don't know. Thanks guys for the info. Good luck.
     
  5. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    Rebel has a good handle on how to handle floaters. I don't have floaters that stay around but my eyes do bleed each day and sometimes in big blotches that totally block out my vision causing total temporary blindness. But it reabsorbs in time. However, never is completely gone and never the same day to day. I've learned to look through all of the blood in my eyes...somehow. Don't know how to explain that but Rebel has the same approach I use. They probably "stick out" in your vision because they are new to you. I was told recently by an eye surgeon that there is a new injection that will dissolve floaters.

    Good luck with it because it is a difficult problem.

    milt
     
  6. OldGoat

    OldGoat Well-Known Member

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    Easy to say; Tough to do: Ignore Them....my eye doc (a well-regarded opthamologist in KC who provided a "second opinion") says they will eventually go away or you will get so used to them that you can successfully ignore them. Hope so...getting old is not fun. Meanwhile, I have been able to shoot fairly good scores. Hang in there...my allergies seem to be more of a problem. Best Regards, Ed
     
  7. Allen-MX8

    Allen-MX8 Member

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    I have had floaters for many years and what I have done, when I do notice them, is to look up then down and perhaps to the left or right as well. This ususally re-positons the floaters to where I don't notice them when shooting at that time. (No head movement, just the eyes).

    I guess I have got used to them somewhat as they rarely bother me now.

    Hope this helps. Allen.
     
  8. MKillian

    MKillian TS Member

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    I don't have the floaters but I DO have the "blurry curtains" from vitreous detachment. You can't move them by rolling the eyes around. Cloudy days are the worst. It's like shooting while looking through a window that has water running down it!

    Mike K
     
  9. docbombay

    docbombay Well known trouble maker

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    I have a nice big round floater in my left eye. On a standard rib gun, the floater appears on the same plane with the target, about three feet to the left of the bird. I had to constantly remind myself to shoot the orange target on the right and not the black one on the left. But...........easier said then done. So many times I would swing right past that orange bird and kill the black one.

    With my head more upright, the floater drops down to the lower left and is not parallel with the bird, it appears to be about five to seven feet below the target.

    My way around the problem was to build my gun in such a manner as to hold my head very upright. The gun may look a little "drastic" but it works for me. My scores improved and I believe I see the targets better overall as an added bonus.

    What is ironic is that trap shooting is what caused the problem in the first place. When I started this sport just over a year ago my buddy who got me into it let me use his BT99 to see if I liked shooting clays before going out and buying my own gun. That Browning kicked like a mule and after only two weeks of shooting the darn thing I experienced a retina tear. Now I cannot be sure that the recoil is what caused the tear for certain, but it was the only variable in the equation.

    So now after one year and countless thousands spent on eye surgery, guns, ammo, clothing, gun alterations and entry fees and options, I really have a love/hate relationship with this sport.

    I think I am going to introduce my buddy to archery deer hunting.
     
  10. MKillian

    MKillian TS Member

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    I guess I'm lucky. All the doctors I consulted both times my vitreous detached assured me that shooting was NOT the cause of my condition nor would shooting be responsible for any changes in the future.

    Apparently it the most common age-related eye problem doctors see.

    Mike K
     
  11. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    My problem with floaters is not so much seeing the target, but knowing if I broke it. The floaters often look like pieces of the target, and sometimes a miss looks like a hit.
    I never ask: "did anybody see a piece off that?" I just assmume it was a floater.
     
  12. minnship8

    minnship8 Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, but the surgery mentioned in this thread...will it prevent future floaters?
     
  13. Dave S

    Dave S Active Member

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    Check out this prior post about floaters. Click on the above link.
     
  14. EuroJoe

    EuroJoe TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I'd be interested in hearing about any treatment for floaters. Mine came on suddenly about 3 years ago, went to retina Spec, & he said "learn to love them"
    I've heard about a Laser treatment, but have been advised against it. He repaired some retina tears, and said to stay off a gunstock for 3 montha.
    Heads-up shooting is out of the question, middle of the eye is where the problems are, but I can look over them with my head down.
     
  15. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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  16. wlc

    wlc Member

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    I reently spoke to a shooter who had the laser treatment done in California. He had just had a second treatment done and was very happy with the results. I plan to call them to find out if the vitreous detachment blobs can sucessfully be treated.
     
  17. kgun_shooter

    kgun_shooter Member

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    The laser surgery is less invasive and does work quite well for certain type's of floaters. The most common type of floater that this procedure is used on is called a Weiss's ring. It is usually caused by the vitreous completely detaching from the retinal wall. They are usually larger and more disturbing to the vision. I also know that for the surgery to be performed the floater has to be a certain distance away from the retina or damage can occur from the laser, at least this was the case a few years ago. Most of the time the smaller floaters that we see can't be treated by the laser surgery and only the vitrectomy will take care of those.

    The Vitrectomy is performed by making three small incisions in the Sclera (white part of the eye) and inserting three small surgical instruments. One is a light, another is a cutting device, and finally a suction device. The cutter then proceeds to cut up the vitreous then it is sucked out. Contrary to popular belief the surgery is not that problematic. With the advent of smaller gauge intruments and precision cutting tools the procedure can be completed with almost no complications. The main side-effect of the surgery is the quick onset of cataracts. Which most scientific studies are now showing was the result of the larger gauge instruments, but there are still patients that get them even when the surgery is performed with the smaller instruments. Most vitrectomies are performed because the eye surgeon needs to perform some type of surgery on the retina. That is why most people associate the surgery as having bad consequencies even though there are other underlying serious conditions that were present before the surgery was completed.

    Most doctors in the United States will not perform a Floater only Vitrectomy (FOV). Because they believe it is not in the best intersest of the patient to operate on a healthy eye. They see the condition of floaters as benign and tell almost all of their patients that they should get use to them or that they will eventually go away. Some people do get use to them but usually if the patient has brought this to the attention of their doctor then they are more than a nuisance.

    Doctors outside of this country are having great success doing FOV's. With the use of Vitrase and other drugs that help to liquify the vitreous the procedure is becoming even more routine. But don't look for the doctors in this country to jump on the band wagon soon. There has been much debate about FOV's and most doctors in this country still agree that it is not in the best interest of the patient. If you do tell you doctor that they are so distracting that you are having problems driving and performing normal day to day tasks then they might cosider doing a FOV, but don't count on it.

    If you have anymore questions just ask and I'll try to answer them.
     
  18. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

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    Stop listening to all the BS that says nothing can be done. I had vitreous floaters appear about one month after cataract surgery. My Doc said nothing should be done. Too dangerous a procedure. Should be done as a last resort to blindness only. Many others on this forum have echoed the same advice.

    AGAIN, I SAY ***BS***

    My floaters were constant for about a year and then started to interfer with my sight line down the barrel. I talked to a shooter that had the same condition (posterior vitreous detachment) completely eliminated, one eye for two years, the other for four years. No problems of any kind. I contacted the same firm, different office different Dr, interviewed him with specific questions and was given references. He had been doing this type surgery for twelve years and currently does about eight per week. The danger is in about 1% of patients there is a possibility of retina detachment, but not to worry because they have the ability to repair if necessary. He has performed this procedure on NFL and NBA players, an un-named champion trap shooter, and thousands of others.

    I hade the vitrious floaters removed from the right eye in June, 2011 and in the left in Sept. Vision is bright an clear, seeing better than 20/20. No pain or discomfort during surgery or afterwards. If needed I would do it again without a second thought. Last weekend I was able to shoot again for the first time in four months. I could not believe how well I was seeing targets. Lots of body rust but I was right in the middle and smoked 48X50. On the other two I moved the gun before reading the bird, LOST!!.

    Suffer if you must, BUT YOU DON'T HAVE TO. Following is a link to the facility I used. It is a large site and should answer all your questions. Marc

    http://www.floridaretinainstitute.com/
     
  19. MKillian

    MKillian TS Member

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    They are your eyes; take whatever chances you want to with them. Trap is not important enough to me to risk my eye sight for it.

    The ability to repair a torn retina does not automatically guarantee restoring normal sight; it may only keep the tear from spreading further leaving the vision permanently limited.

    Mike K
     
  20. kgun_shooter

    kgun_shooter Member

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    luvtrapguns,

    Did they insert a gas bubble after the procedure, or laser the retina to prevent a detachment. Just curious, you said there was no discomfort after the surgery. I know of several retinal surgeons that always insert the gas bubble which requires the patient to remain face down for several days, can be weeks in some instances.
     
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