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AA HULS CAUSING PROBLEMS

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Jim101, Feb 17, 2009.

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  1. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    I've heard rumors to that effect, But I've loaded over 300,000 of them with out a problem.

    I'm sure you will lots of variable input.



    Jim
     
  2. welderman

    welderman TS Member

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    In my experience, failure to resize the brass is the most common cause of reloaded shells sticking and failing to extract or eject. You have 3 choices; 1) use only new brass 2)Use a resizing station on your re-loader 3) Have your gun chamber enlarged to feed the expanded brass. Tom S. (welderman)
     
  3. abiezer

    abiezer Guest

    I've read that early runs of em loaded on a ponsness (that holds the hull
    while inserting primer,rather than mecs way of pushing on the basewad to seat the primer) could cause the basewad to get popped up in the realoading process
    (not from firing in and of itself), i believe the last few years, winchester has rectified the issue, and it may again not be a problem on a ponsness, it's never been a problem on a mec.I load em by the bucketfull on my 9000,
    i've never had a problem, i load paper b/w hulls as well.
     
  4. ou.3200

    ou.3200 Well-Known Member

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    I haven't had the basewad leave the hull and lodge in the barrel but having said that, I have stopped using the Winchester hulls with separate base wad because of the base wads being loose inside the hull. I was loading once fired two piece Winchester hulls and noted that the shot was up to the top of the crimp before applying starting crimp. I removed the shell to see if I could find a problem. The shot weight was correct as was the weight of the powder and the wad was the one specified. I found that the base wad had moved up in the hull about 1/4". I continued loading and found three or four more that did the same thing which I took as a warning sign. No more of the new Winchester hulls.
     
  5. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    If you have any doubts about the AAs you have, take a few apart and see if the base wad is loose. HMB
     
  6. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    I have been reloading AA's since 1975. 100's of thousands. I have never had a base wad come loose.
     
  7. BrotherwolfCA

    BrotherwolfCA TS Member

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    Which wads are you gentlemen using in the new AA hull? I perfer red dot powder when reloading these hulls. Which wad have you had the most success in using when reloading these new AA hulls?
     
  8. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    It is indeed the newer AA model, the AAHS hull that has had problems. The first to arise was that when reloading, wads would often catch on the shoulder of the base wad which is an actual separate part. Any wad so caught could then crush, twist, or even cause deformation of the loaded shell. Winchester actually altered their appropriate wads to improve things and MEC posted instructions on how to ease that problem with their machines.

    The subject here of the base wad coming loose and ending up in the barrel of a shotgun has been discussed at agonizing length several times with near every possible explanation on how it could or could not happen. We've even seen alleged pictures of such a result. Whether true, possible, or any other possibility remains unanswered to me. The fix was simple in my loading area - use Remington hulls.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  9. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    I've use old style and new style. I've shot and reloaded every type of AA made in the last 34 years. And I repeat "no base wad problem, ever."
     
  10. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    I've never seen an actual case of a migrating or loose basewad in a new AA hull. I have not seen a case with a missing base wad. I have inspected and loaded many thousands since they came out. All that was required was a suitable wad, a few adjustments to the press, and loading them in a press like the Mecs that apply pressure to the basewad in order to seat the primers. I've never seen a problem with the AA hulls and a PW press either, but I'm not into tempting fate. I inspect EVERY hull I load before and after the loading process, each time I load them. I use a strong light and double check the inside of the hull. I also resize them every time I load them. If something is even a little off, they get tossed. I also don't load them until they start losing pieces and falling apart. Five or Six loadings at the most and I toss them. Sooner if they show signs of deterioration.

    I also load other hulls, especially Remingtons. I don't like the wide variations in hull lengths that I sometimes encounter. I will not consider loading anything made by UEE, Rio, Kemen, Diana, White Gold, etc. I have many examples of some that have had a significant basewad migration with the first firing of the factory loaded shell. The manufacturer showed very little concern about it when I addressed the issue with them and sent some examples. I don't use new factory shells of that manufacture either. I have had other issues in cold weather and even some in nice warmer weather. I was happy when I had finished the last box of a bunch I bought. I won't buy them again and certainly won't load them. There are also many people that will swear by these shells. I'm one that prefers to shoot something else.
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I have not had a problem loading AA hulls. Like HMB, I have taken a few apart and tried to get the base wad lose. That is not at all easy. When the change was first made, I did have a couple of posters on this site send me a couple of hulls with a lose base wad. The hulls had been loaded many, very many, times. These hulls were shown to Winchester at the SHOT Show about 5 years ago.

    Winchester would not acknowledge a problem, but they did make a change in the way the base wad was attached to the rest of the hull. The problem, but not the shooter comments, has been rectified.

    I have about 50,000 once fired AA hulls, 80 bags of shot, 15,000 primers, a good PW Hydraulic press and so many wads, they are in my way. I wish I had the time to combine these things into loaded shells. Someday, maybe tomorrow, I will get started.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. dezcon

    dezcon Member

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    I had a Model 12 almost blow up because of a Winchester AA base wad coming loose and sticking in the barrel. The chamber was rebuilt by Stu Wright and was .022 out of round. It was a cold winter night in NE Ohio at the Lowellville gun club. I was shooting reloaded AA grey hulls. The load was 24.5 grains of 7625, AA wad and 1 1/8 oz. of 7 1/2s loaded on a P/W 900 hydrulic press. Half way through the night, KABOOM!!! The stock cracked in half and the receiver would not open. Pretty shook up, my night was over and I gave the gun to Mark Hoffman (a machinist and very familiar with Model 12's)to take home to open. The immediate prognosis is that I double charged the powder which I felt was impossible but I was really shook up. When I got home Mark called me and said he got the receiver open and was wondering if I still had my empties bag. Since I reload, I did. He said to pull out all of the empties and put a pencil inside each one to check to see if they all had base wads inside. After checking one shell was missing a base wad and must have been the shot before the KABOOM. There is NO DOUBT IN MY MIND that the gun damage was caused by the base wad from the previous shot got stuck in the forcing cone and the next shot caused the shot column to stutter going down the barrel until there was enough back pressure to push the stuck wad and shot column down and out of the barrel, just before the chamber blew. Thank God it was a Winchester Model 12 and God Damn it was a Winchester "new" AA two piece hull with a base wad. There is NO WAY you can load 49 grains of 7625 with a AA wad and 1 1/8 oz of 7 1/2 s in an AA hull and close the crimp. It is my further determination that the P/W press maybe part of the problem because it pushes the primer up into the base of the brass and base wad with NO top force downward on the base wad to hold it in place. Wheareas, a MEC PUSHES the hull downward on the base wad to set the primer by top of the base wad. The MEC actually sets the base wad whereas the P/W lifts the base wad off of the bottom of the hull. The hydraulic takes any chance of "feeling" this base wad separation out of the equation. I now only load STS. David Zofko
     
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