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A question about Perazzi shotguns

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by ysr_racer, Feb 9, 2009.

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  1. ysr_racer

    ysr_racer Active Member

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    Why do I keep seeing posts for Perazzi parts? There are probably 5 or 6 on here right now. Do they break parts that often?

    When I see a Perazzi "for sale", the ad always says "just serviced by xxxxxx". Do they need that much service?

    I've shot the hell out of my Browning 525, and never had to replace or service anything. Anybody have any ideas why Perazzi's need so much work?
     
  2. Gregg535

    Gregg535 Member

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    About the only part that actually breaks somewhat regularly would be the "V" flat style hammer springs- They will break somewhere between 10,000 and 50,000 shots ---it is impossible to tell. They can be replaced in about 2 minutes if you practiced a time or two first.

    Other shotguns that use similar flat springs break them in about the same time frame ---say for example the SKB85TSS guns. Coil powered hammer springs like in your 525 will not tend to ever break but will get weak over time and need to be replaced as they will start to have the occasional misfire.
     
  3. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    There are so many Perazzis out there and many shooters, like me replace all the springs at least once a year. This is not unusual in the tournament trapshooting world. K80's have their annuals, the new G-guns too. Ljutic springs get weak and so do all of the guns using coil springs to power thier hammers or straightline firing mechanisms.

    Maintaining performance is what it's all about.

    I read once in an old interview with Daniel Perazzi that he developed his guns to mirror what Ferarri did with their racing engines. Make the car/gun easy to repair at the track/field to get back in the race without a bunch of fitting and maintaining performance. He knew full well that the flat springs would not last and that the firing pins would, eventually wear out or break. He didn't do it for built-in obsolecence or just to sell parts. He had to make a compromise. To maintain new performance he had to have a part that was a weak link. But he designed it easily replaced without a trip to the gunsmith. I think this has actually saved a lot of labor cost for the avid shooter and not an indication that there is anything wrong with the P-gun.
     
  4. ysr_racer

    ysr_racer Active Member

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    >> I read once in an old interview with Daniel Perazzi that he developed his guns to mirror what Ferarri

    After I posted I was thinking the same thing. I have a '95 Ducati 916 (motorcycle) and it needs way more work than a Honda, but it's worth it.

    Sportshot, not a troll on this one, just asking a question. Sometimes it happens.

    Thanks for all the replies. I get the feeling that Perazzi owners shoot many more rounds a year than the average gun owner.
     
  5. Gregg535

    Gregg535 Member

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    ysr racer,

    You probably have it right with your last sentence. Take your 525 for example---what is the oldest 525 that is out there??? Probably introduced in about 2003 or so. As of now, a lot of the Perazzi singles in the TM series and many of the MX8 guns are pretty old in comparison, some are well over 30 years and being trap guns, many have been shot a lot and have been bought & sold several times over that period.
     
  6. JH

    JH Well-Known Member

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    Brad, you really want two "tuned" matching 391s for a lot less money and besides, you are no trap shooter......
     
  7. sean justice

    sean justice TS Member

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    if u own a ducati then you understand the diff., also perazzi trigger is top, and i have a k-80 too, both great, go ahead and buy one great deals out there on used ones, youll never wear it out, it was designed to be serviced in the field, [like on the olympic line].
     
  8. hiboost745

    hiboost745 TS Member

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    I am more of a sporting clays guy than a trap shooter. However I do shoot several Brownings. I have a 1992 GTI that has more than 500,000 rounds pushed through it. I have replaced the hammer springs once. Very little other work done to the gun. Good thing however that it has been reliable. I sent my Browning Euro 325 back to Browning last July for non user serviceable work. At this point it is scheduled to returned to me in March.

    Shotguns that can be field serviced by the owner have great value. Soonner or later they do break. I also wish I could afford a Perazzi. Just the name alone conjers up images of sleek, fast and beautiful. An for sure they are beautiful guns.

    Jon
     
  9. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    hiboost745, You claim to have 1/2 a million rounds through your Browning GTI. Do some math tonight, at a very very modest 20 cents a round for the 1/2 million targets (target, shell) that comes out to $100,000 big ones. You could have bought a new ZR1 Corvette and a Perazzi combo of your choice.

    )
     
  10. hiboost745

    hiboost745 TS Member

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    Over the course of 17 years I am sure I could have. However I preferred to go out to the range instead. Using your analigy I guess if I would have stopped driving my car in 1992 I could have also bought the Perazzi Combo or the cars. Maybe all of them with the money I saved on not buying gas!

    Math 500000 / 17 (years) = 29500 (appox) rounds per year. Thats less than 600 rounds per week.

    I will admit the gun has had the hell beat out of it. Head spacing is begining to become an issue. Browning wont fix that one.


    Jon
     
  11. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    The point is, over the long haul your shotgun is one of your least costly investments in clay target shooting. shotgun shells, target, and transportation are your largest expense. So if you bought that new Perazzi MX-8 special combo in 1992 for $7000 divide that into 17 years of shooting it would come to around $400 a year expense. Today that gun would still bring around $3,500-4,000 used.
     
  12. freddy01

    freddy01 Member

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    I have owned 3 Brownings, 2, 99 Maxes and 1 Citori. 1 Remington 1100 trap. 2 Ljutic Mono Guns, Winchester Model 12 and now a MX 2000 Perazzi Combo.

    I have had routine maintenance work done on all of them the over the years.

    None of them ever let me down "on the line".

    Perazzi hammer springs are fast and easy to change. Had Giaccmo tune up the receiver and trigger 3 years ago $325.00. Shoot about 50,000 +/- rounds a year.


    Fred Dague, West Virginia
     
  13. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    All guns, if shot enough, eventually need some service. A leaf spring offers some advantages over a coil spring, but they do break sooner.

    Pat Ireland
     
  14. Aintlost

    Aintlost Member

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    Perazzi, Rolex,Rolls Royce, and fine wine
    Browning, Timex, Ford, Ripple.
    You decide what are the finer things in life.
     
  15. ysr_racer

    ysr_racer Active Member

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    In 1995 I bought a Ducati 916 (motorcycle) for about $15,000. That was a lot more than the top line Honda was going for. I think a Honda CBR900 RR was going for about $8,000 at the time.

    My friends thought I was crazy. My Duc was finicky, expensive to repair, and not great in town.

    But it was a work of art. Sleek lines, a single sided swing arm, and it was painted "arrest me" red.

    On the open road it was the Super Bike.

    I still have my Duc, but my friends that bought Hondas have had three or four bikes since then. My 14 year old Duc is still far and above the average street rider's ability to use all of.

    My point is, while I spent A LOT of money up front, I saved a ton of money in the long run.I think the same thing holds true for fine shotguns.
     
  16. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    To repeat what has been said umpteen times here on TS.COM regarding the springs:

    I would rather have the Perazzi leaf spring BREAK, than have a coil as is used in the Brownings and some Perazzis and many others get weaker and weaker and weaker.

    When the fast leaf breaks, you know what the problem is then and there. You change it out in a couple of minutes and you are on your way as new. The coil is another story, and ONLY *IF* you recognize that it is losing its tension. Change one of those out in two minutes - not.

    It you owned a Ferrari, I think you would still have to change plugs, filter, oil, etc. Regardless of the equipment YOU STILL should do periodic maintenance.

    I guess that if a $26 spring is keeping one from buying a $10,000-$20,000 Perazzi, then maybe one ought to consider a lesser gun.

    The reason there are many recent threads regarding parts for them is because I have been lucky enough to convince a manufacturer in Italy to produce equivalent if not better parts for these guns at about half the price. I ordered some springs from Perazzi USA the other day and the bill was approaching $300. My manufacturer in Italy about fell over seeing the invoice. He said he would get right at supplying us in the US with the same stuff at a much lesser price.

    Furthermore, Perazzi Italy is facing some difficult financial times and the latest word is that Beretta is buying them out. According to my Italian connection, this is good, because Beretta is a rather liberal company.

    A last reminder: 11 Olympic Gold metals in the last Olympics were won with Perazzis. Even if we aren't smart enough to know better, some folks are.

    IMHO.

    Whiz
     
  17. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    Perazzi's are sold around the world. American trap shooters buy the heavy ones..because that's what they want.. The Sporting Clay shooters wanted a faster.. quicker dynamic shotgun that made the Perazzi line famous..and they got it.. I will not mention Bunker shooting.. but it put Perazzi on the map with a 1.45 to 1.55 KG barreled O/U 28 5/8" long.. now 29.5"long.. Once you shoot the "real" Perazzi.. you'll quickly understand..why.. BTW. Beretta also makes lighter.. better dynamic shotguns for the European market..
     
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