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a little marriage humor

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Bruce Specht, Jan 23, 2008.

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  1. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    Excellent !!!!
     
  2. hairy

    hairy TS Member

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  3. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    My dad used to have a car like that. It was a 1949 Studebaker with an inline 6 (a flathead I think) and a 3 speed on the column. He was a salesman who had clients all over the state of Kentucky and he put well over 200,000 miles on the car with no major problems. We loved that car and it took our family everywhere.

    He bought a new Studebaker in 1953 that had an automatic transmission and a V-8 that just about bankrupted the family. He traded it in with less than 50,000 miles on it. When he traded it in, all it would was idle.


    The body of the 1953 Studebaker was very aerodynamic. In the late 1960’s, there was an article in Motor Trend about a 1953 Studebaker powered by a Chrysler Corp Hemi that held the land speed record for an automobile. As memory serves, it was capable of over 250 miles per hour on the Bonneville Salt Flats.
     
  4. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    The Studebakers that ran fast at Bonneville were usually the Lowey bodied coupe fom approximately 52-54 or thereabouts. Not the goofy looking one, but the pretty one. In 66 or 68, as a kid, I saw one of those powered by a Hemi on fuel, supercharged, go 278 mph and some change. Remember, this was late 60's. It was quite a sound and sight.
     
  5. Bocephas

    Bocephas Well-Known Member

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    An 86-year-old man went to his doctor for his quarterly check-up.
    The doctor asked him how he was feeling,and the 86-yeard-old said,'Things are great and I've never felt better.'

    I now have a 20 year-old bride who is pregnant with my child.

    "So what do you think about that Doc?"

    The doctor considered his question for a minute and then began to tell a story.

    "I have an old friend,much like you,who is an avid hunter and never misses a season."

    One day he was setting off to go hunting.

    In a bit of a hurry,he accidentally picked up his walking cane instead of his gun.

    As he neared a lake,he came across a very large beaver sitting at the water's edge.

    He realized he'd left his gun at home and so he couldn't shoot the magnificent creature.

    Out of habit he raised his cane'aimed it at the animal as if it were his favorite hunting rifle and went'bang,bang'."

    Miraculously,two shots rang out and the beaver fell over dead.

    Now,what do you thinks of that?asked the doctor.

    The 86-year-old said,Logic would strongly suggest that somebody else pumped a couple of rounds into that beaver,

    The doctor replied,My point exactly.
    '
     
  6. pendennis

    pendennis Well-Known Member

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    School_Teacher - One of the rod racers in Louisville had a '53 Stude' with a really hot Hemi. He would lightly tape a $50 bill to the dash. If you could get the bill before he got to 4th gear, the $50 was yours. I don't think he ever had to pay off.

    Best,
    Dennis
     
  7. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Pendennis:


    I was hitchhiking once in the 1960's, before Viet Nam, and I had a similar experience with a person who had an early 60's two-door full size Chevy. It had a four speed and either a 396 or a 409. As soon as I sat down in front, he burned rubber. I could not get my back off of the seat until he was in 4th and was really booking. He slowed down and we laughed and I got out at the next intersection. I can still hear that Chevy wind up in my ears.


    When I was in engineering school (U of L Speed School), two twin brothers (the Franklins) had a 1961 Chevy Biscayne set up for 1/8th mile drags. It had a 327 with a 283 crank to yield a very short stroke 301. The rear end was about a 6.77. It went from zero to 100 or so in 3 or 4 seconds. The rings were shot and it laid down a veritable smoke screen when they pulled into the parking lot.
     
  8. alfermann66

    alfermann66 Member

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    school_teacher, I'll bet pendennis would take a zero off that bill taped to the dash if you'd add about 10 seconds to that Biscayne's 0 to 100 time. LOL!

    Buz
     
  9. pendennis

    pendennis Well-Known Member

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    I attended UofL. Started in '65. Went back in '71, graduated in '76. When did you attend Speed? Spent too much time in '66 playing bridge at the SUB, instead of concentrating on Chem 201-202.

    There was another guy in Louisville in the mid-60's, Lyde Wagers (sp?). Owned a '56 Nomad wagon named "The Wompin" Wagon". It had the hottest 283 in it I ever saw. He used to race at Ohio Valley Raceway on Saturday nites.

    I used to run a '50 Merc there. Flathead V8. Got my clock cleaned regularly by a guy who had a '48 Olds wagon with a straight 8. M Stock. Great fun.

    Best,
    Dennis
     
  10. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Pendennis:

    I started at Speed in the fall of 1963 and left in March of 1966. Like you, I guess that I spent too much time in the Student Union playing cards. I "hit the wall" in a Thermodynamics class. At about 10:30 AM, I wrote "don't know" in the test booklet, left class, drove a 1962 Rambler down to 14th and Broadway and enlisted in the Infantry. Three months later, while at Ft Benning, I got my grades from Speed. I made a “C” in Thermodynamics. I left the ARMY in the fall of 1969, met my future wife of 37 years and counting, and enrolled in Arts and Sciences with an undeclared major.


    After Speed, A&S was a cakewalk. I made some "A”‘s and got off of academic probation. I then enrolled in the School of Business and graduated with a BSC in Accounting. I became a CPA and worked for a big out of town CPA firm for a few years. The CPA firm trained me in computers and I became a programmer, systems analyst, project leader, etc.


    My wife and I wanted to get back to Louisville for personal reasons so I took a pay cut and began working for the City of Louisville. I also went back to U of L and obtained an MBA. I quickly became their director of data processing and, as it came with the job, became deeply involved in Democratic Party politics.


    Many posters I suspect do not have a good understanding of how a political party works especially at the precinct level. There are organizational meetings, phone banks, union halls, fund raising, mailing lists, knocking on doors and the constant wars between factions within the same party. It's "my friends versus your friends" and it's dirty. I learned the first law of politics. "Anything is fair in an election."


    The democrats in those days were more like republicans. I helped one candidate run for the US House and the NRA supported us as he was pro gun and the republican was somewhat anti-gun. We lost but I enjoyed the experience. When I left the City, my involvement in politics, except as a voter, ended.


    I left the City and got a good job at a bank and that lasted until a larger bank bought us and I was asked to relocate. I quit and again took a pay cut but was contacted by a large manufacturing firm. I got a great job and was able to work for enough years to get a decent retirement.


    I went back to school again and obtained a Masters of Arts in Teaching degree and certifications to teach math and science. I taught full time for a while and now, due to family responsibilities, I just teach as a long term or daily substitute.


    I teach one day and I can buy a flat of good shells and pay an entry fee. I can live with that.


    In closing, I enjoy the interaction with the kids and feel like a young person while I am teaching. Many of the kids of today are great and have high hopes for a great life.


    I often shoot ATA at Indian Creek on the 2nd saturday of the month.
     
  11. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    pendennis & school teacher...

    I too went to the U of L...twice.....fall of '64 on a football scholarship, left in '65 and joined the paratroopers.....after 'Nam I transferred to the U of Delaware and then went to work for the Delaware State Police and went back to Louisville to attend the Southern Police Institute.

    My brother (retired FBI) is a U of L graduate and currently lives in Louisville.....

    Small world....huh?

    Curt - Delaware
     
  12. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    Curt:

    I knew that you were a fine person.

    Good luck,

    Ed
     
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