1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

A friend gave me a free lathe....

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, Aug 14, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    View attachment 230722

    A friend of mine, going back to junior high, got disgusted with the responses for his craigslist ad, and asked me if I wanted his lathe, free. He's moving and has no more room for it. Same friend who gave my son Sean a milling machine a while back (he offered it to me but I already had an identical one, so it went to my son).

    Picked it up today. It's a Myford ML-7. Serial number dates to 1971. It has a screw cutting gear box. Came with various cutting bits, reamers, adjustable reamers, layout and measuring equipment, several books including some 'model engineer' (what Brits call serious amateur machinists) books, plus other accessories. For some reason there doesn't appear to be any collets with it.

    It's in good shape, and the bedways are not worn. It needs some cleanup. Some of the accessory parts were stored, not used, and have freckling and light oxidation. The lathe itself operates fine.

    Came on a huge table that was not in the best of condition. It went to the dump. Will probably make a new table for my bench mill, and put the lathe on the bench mill's table, which is perfect for the lathe but over twice as wide as it needs to be for the mill. Need to make or buy a splash pan.

    Been pouring over the machining books. Would like to dive in, but have to mount it on a bench first. It weighs around 220 lbs.

    Specs for the ML-7. 3.5"x20". It ain't gunna do rifle barrels. Maybe a 16" 10-22 barrel, but it would be pretty tight. There is a bed gap that will allow larger diameter, but shorter length, work to be turned. Perhaps up to 5", but I have not found a spec on that yet. The screw cutting gearbox is English threads, but there are metric kits available. I don't know how much. ML-7 parts aren't cheap. These lathes were made with very few changes from 194 to 1979. There is a long bed model, but this ain't it.

    It ain't winning the lottery, but I still came out a winner. I'm very grateful to my friend for this.

    Detailed photos of a restored ML-7 are here:
    <A HREF="http://www.lathes.co.uk/myfordml7photoessay/" TARGET="_blank">http://www.lathes.co.uk/myfordml7photoessay/</A>

    General ML-7 info here:
    <A HREF="http://www.lathes.co.uk/myford-ml7/index.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www.lathes.co.uk/myford-ml7/index.html</A>
     
  2. cunninmp

    cunninmp Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    639
    Hey Brian,

    For free you made out well.
    Your Myford is a hobby lathe. But with some knowledge and
    patience it will be a good tool.
    Congrats on a good find.
    Should be a lot of fun to play with.
    I have a BSME and had a Tool and Die Shop for many years.
    Email me for any help.

    Mike C.

    Groveland, CA
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    It was a good tool for my friend's late father. He used it in his tool and die business for many years. I remember watching him use it to make polished slider posts or whatever you call them for the punch dies.
     
  4. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    17,178
    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    The price was sure right. I'd say you scored. I would love to have a small lathe in my shop. With the way you like to tinker and rebuild things, it will come in real handy.
     
  5. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,939
    The most expensive things in life are free. I was taught this as a young lad and have never forgotten it.

    ss
     
  6. 320090T

    320090T Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,348
    Location:
    Indiana
    I don't see a drawbar for the collets. Without that, you don't need collets. Nice little lathe, you will be surprised what all can be done on it.
     
  7. larrystrollo

    larrystrollo Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    306
    Brian;

    That's a beauty. Mosey on over to this site for lots of good info:

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net


    Larry
     
  8. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,859
    Beautiful,clean,hi percision lathe..especially with collets..Use it in good health..Plenty of power to make many small gun parts.. Don't overlook your milling attachment..You'll be surprised at how many things you can actually make on it.. Yes parts are expensive.. and yes.. there is an American threading changeover kit that includes 27 tpi.. which you'll need for making STAR reloading dies.. Use it in good health.. Mike
     
  9. SBray

    SBray Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    797
    Brian,

    You have been given a fine piece of machinery. Even though I have never used a lathe myself, a friend is a gunsmith and machinist that has an older lathe. I have watched him many times work with metal on the lathe. I have explored the Internet seeking more knowledge about lathes and came across one of many sources to increase my knowledge of the subject. Here is a good example of a machinist that has spent a great deal of time teaching others:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTQ46NMMc88&feature=related

    Hope you enjoy your lathe!

    Steve
     
  10. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Thanks for the links, guys.

    I need to first get this lathe on a proper bench. My milling machine is on a heavy steel table that's three times wider than it needs to be. I'll find or make a new narrower bench for it, and put the lathe in its place. Then clean the lathe up. Next it needs an oil cup to replace one that's partially missing. The bearings are babbitt and a constant flow of oil is a must.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.