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A couple of Tru Oil questions

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by darincraft, Mar 21, 2011.

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  1. darincraft

    darincraft Member

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    I have been using Tru Oil for a while now and it occurred to me there has got to be another way to apply and finish Tru Oil than the way I have been doing it.

    I use a rubber glove to apply the oil until it gets tacky, and then 0000 steel wool to knock down all the little pin point "bubbles." Then I polish it with rubbing compound and apply wax.

    Is there a better way that someone else has found? What do you do after the steel wool to get the gloss back?

    Darin
     
  2. esetter

    esetter Active Member

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    Don't use steel wool. Use wet or dry sand paper. Steel wood will leave fine particles of steel in the finish that will eventually rust. Also steel wool cuts the finish out of the pores of the wood you are trying to fill. Use a sanding block with the wet or dry paper and you cut the finish off the top leaving the finish in the pores filling them much more quickly. Use about 400 your first few coats and then go finer up to 1000 or even 2000 if you are really doing a nice gun. I always do a final rub with pumice and then Rhottenstone with a little oil on a rag. Give that soft sheen that I like. Just the way I do things.
     
  3. trapen

    trapen Member

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    I use my hand and fingers apply a little at the time rub it till it dries use hair dryer to help dry then repeat again till you get finish you want use 2000# wet paper then polish with stock sheen hope this helps PS little bit goes a long way hand rub dry . Jim
     
  4. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    For a really smooth finish, a paint gun works best.
     
  5. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Even if you spray you still have to use wet sandpaper to get the dust out. This is Tru-oil, sprayed. Wet sanded, polished with headlight lens cleaner, and waxed, a week after the final coat.
    stlflyn_2010_070490.jpg
     
  6. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Stl Flyn, Do you mean dust that lands on the stock after it is sprayed? What really hurts is when a bug does the watusi on the final coat.
     
  7. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    THis is automotive clearcoat that was sprayed yesterday. No rubbing, polishing, or buffing. Jim
    jim101_2008_03035.jpg
     
  8. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Jim101,

    Is that the two part acrylic urethane? Jon
     
  9. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    Yes it's a two part paint.

    Jim
     
  10. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Jim, looks very nice.
     
  11. citadel

    citadel Active Member

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    Stl Flyn How many coats of Tru Oil was used on that stock. It is great
    Doug
     
  12. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    I've used Japanese Dryer to help speed up it drying process.
     
  13. darincraft

    darincraft Member

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    Thanks guys. Well all of you told me what my problem was. I was using 600 to polish and need to step it up to 2000. The other idea I was entertaining was using clear coat. I'll def-def-definitely be doing that on the stock I am working on. I'm on my 6th coat of oil and still have two other stocks that need to be cut, bushed, hardwared and finished.

    Thanks again
    Darin
     
  14. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    Yes it's a Wenig new american trap on a 20ga frame with 410 barrels. Comb cut to make it shoot about 60/40. It works real good on the skeet field. Should be like a death ray in the dove patch this fall.


    Jim
     
  15. teddy34

    teddy34 TS Member

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    This is for both Stl and Jim. Very nice looking stocks. Did either
    of you use a stain or was your walnut naturally that dark?

    Thanks, Gary Owen
     
  16. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Jim101, Clear coat is fast to apply and very tough stuff. Have you ever tried to do a spot repair on clear coat? I think you would have to recoat the entire stock.
     
  17. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    I used a walnut stain and filler from Brownell's. You could just use a stain and sand it in to fill the pores. Jon
     
  18. Ed Pawlus

    Ed Pawlus TS Member

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    I have a question about using clear coat. If you want to use a stain, do you need to use a water base stain or can you use and oil base? Ed
     
  19. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    I didn't use any stain on my stock.

    Jerry, It can be spot repaired same as a spot on a car fender. A little sanding paint and buff to blend the repair.




    Jim
     
  20. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

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    I like the hand rubbed Tru-Oil finish better than the paint. The paint is beautiful, but the oil finish is more flexible. It's less likely to chip when bumped. Of course it's much, much more difficult to apply properly.
     
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